full transcript
From the Ted Talk "Ajit Narayanan: A word game to communicate in any language"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

So I tried this out with kids with autism, and I found that there was an incredible auontm of identification. They were able to create sentences in FreeSpeech which were much more complicated but much more effective than equivalent sentences in English, and I started khgtnini about why that might be the cesa. And I had an idea, and I want to talk to you about this idea next. In about 1997, about 15 years back, there were a group of scientists that were trying to understand how the brain processes language, and they found something very interesting. They found that when you learn a language as a child, as a two-year-old, you nelar it with a certain part of your nirba, and when you learn a language as an adult — for example, if I enwtad to learn Japanese right now — a completely different part of my brain is used. Now I don't know why that's the case, but my guess is that that's because when you learn a language as an adult, you almost invariably learn it through your native language, or through your first language. So what's interesting about FreeSpeech is that when you traeec a sentence or when you create language, a child with tiuams cerstea language with FreeSpeech, they're not using this support language, they're not using this bridge language. They're directly constructing the sentence.

Open Cloze

So I tried this out with kids with autism, and I found that there was an incredible ______ of identification. They were able to create sentences in FreeSpeech which were much more complicated but much more effective than equivalent sentences in English, and I started ________ about why that might be the ____. And I had an idea, and I want to talk to you about this idea next. In about 1997, about 15 years back, there were a group of scientists that were trying to understand how the brain processes language, and they found something very interesting. They found that when you learn a language as a child, as a two-year-old, you _____ it with a certain part of your _____, and when you learn a language as an adult — for example, if I ______ to learn Japanese right now — a completely different part of my brain is used. Now I don't know why that's the case, but my guess is that that's because when you learn a language as an adult, you almost invariably learn it through your native language, or through your first language. So what's interesting about FreeSpeech is that when you ______ a sentence or when you create language, a child with ______ _______ language with FreeSpeech, they're not using this support language, they're not using this bridge language. They're directly constructing the sentence.

Solution

  1. case
  2. thinking
  3. create
  4. creates
  5. brain
  6. amount
  7. learn
  8. wanted
  9. autism

Original Text

So I tried this out with kids with autism, and I found that there was an incredible amount of identification. They were able to create sentences in FreeSpeech which were much more complicated but much more effective than equivalent sentences in English, and I started thinking about why that might be the case. And I had an idea, and I want to talk to you about this idea next. In about 1997, about 15 years back, there were a group of scientists that were trying to understand how the brain processes language, and they found something very interesting. They found that when you learn a language as a child, as a two-year-old, you learn it with a certain part of your brain, and when you learn a language as an adult — for example, if I wanted to learn Japanese right now — a completely different part of my brain is used. Now I don't know why that's the case, but my guess is that that's because when you learn a language as an adult, you almost invariably learn it through your native language, or through your first language. So what's interesting about FreeSpeech is that when you create a sentence or when you create language, a child with autism creates language with FreeSpeech, they're not using this support language, they're not using this bridge language. They're directly constructing the sentence.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
data structure 3

Important Words

  1. adult
  2. amount
  3. autism
  4. brain
  5. bridge
  6. case
  7. child
  8. completely
  9. complicated
  10. constructing
  11. create
  12. creates
  13. effective
  14. english
  15. equivalent
  16. freespeech
  17. group
  18. guess
  19. idea
  20. identification
  21. incredible
  22. interesting
  23. invariably
  24. japanese
  25. kids
  26. language
  27. learn
  28. native
  29. part
  30. processes
  31. scientists
  32. sentence
  33. sentences
  34. started
  35. support
  36. talk
  37. thinking
  38. understand
  39. wanted
  40. years