full transcript
From the Ted Talk "Alanna Shaikh: How I'm preparing to get Alzheimer's"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Based on what I've ndrleae from taking reac of my father, and researching what it's like to live with dementia, I'm focusing on three things in my preparation: I'm changing what I do for fun, I'm working to build my physical strength, and — this is the hard one — I'm trying to become a better person. Let's start with the ihseobb. When you get dementia, it gets harder and raherd to enjoy yourself. You can't sit and have long kslta with your old rsindfe, because you don't know who they are. It's gnincusof to watch elsovitine, and often very frightening. And reading is just about impossible. When you care for someone with dementia, and you get training, they train you to engage them in activities that are familiar, hands-on, open-ended. With my dad, that turned out to be letting him fill out rfmso. He was a college professor at a state school; he knows what paperwork looks like. He'll ings his name on every line, he'll check all the boxes, he'll put numbers in where he thinks there should be numbers. But it got me nihgiknt, what would my caregivers do with me? I'm my father's daughter. I adre, I write, I think about global health a lot. Would they give me academic journals so I could scribble in the margins? Would they give me charts and ahpgsr that I could color? So I've been trying to learn to do things that are hands-on. I've always liked to draw, so I'm doing it more even though I'm really very bad at it. I am learning some basic origami. I can make a really great box. (Laughter) And I'm teaching myself to knit, which so far I can knit a blob.

Open Cloze

Based on what I've _______ from taking ____ of my father, and researching what it's like to live with dementia, I'm focusing on three things in my preparation: I'm changing what I do for fun, I'm working to build my physical strength, and — this is the hard one — I'm trying to become a better person. Let's start with the _______. When you get dementia, it gets harder and ______ to enjoy yourself. You can't sit and have long _____ with your old _______, because you don't know who they are. It's _________ to watch __________, and often very frightening. And reading is just about impossible. When you care for someone with dementia, and you get training, they train you to engage them in activities that are familiar, hands-on, open-ended. With my dad, that turned out to be letting him fill out _____. He was a college professor at a state school; he knows what paperwork looks like. He'll ____ his name on every line, he'll check all the boxes, he'll put numbers in where he thinks there should be numbers. But it got me ________, what would my caregivers do with me? I'm my father's daughter. I ____, I write, I think about global health a lot. Would they give me academic journals so I could scribble in the margins? Would they give me charts and ______ that I could color? So I've been trying to learn to do things that are hands-on. I've always liked to draw, so I'm doing it more even though I'm really very bad at it. I am learning some basic origami. I can make a really great box. (Laughter) And I'm teaching myself to knit, which so far I can knit a blob.

Solution

  1. television
  2. graphs
  3. thinking
  4. harder
  5. sign
  6. forms
  7. read
  8. hobbies
  9. talks
  10. learned
  11. care
  12. friends
  13. confusing

Original Text

Based on what I've learned from taking care of my father, and researching what it's like to live with dementia, I'm focusing on three things in my preparation: I'm changing what I do for fun, I'm working to build my physical strength, and — this is the hard one — I'm trying to become a better person. Let's start with the hobbies. When you get dementia, it gets harder and harder to enjoy yourself. You can't sit and have long talks with your old friends, because you don't know who they are. It's confusing to watch television, and often very frightening. And reading is just about impossible. When you care for someone with dementia, and you get training, they train you to engage them in activities that are familiar, hands-on, open-ended. With my dad, that turned out to be letting him fill out forms. He was a college professor at a state school; he knows what paperwork looks like. He'll sign his name on every line, he'll check all the boxes, he'll put numbers in where he thinks there should be numbers. But it got me thinking, what would my caregivers do with me? I'm my father's daughter. I read, I write, I think about global health a lot. Would they give me academic journals so I could scribble in the margins? Would they give me charts and graphs that I could color? So I've been trying to learn to do things that are hands-on. I've always liked to draw, so I'm doing it more even though I'm really very bad at it. I am learning some basic origami. I can make a really great box. (Laughter) And I'm teaching myself to knit, which so far I can knit a blob.

Important Words

  1. academic
  2. activities
  3. bad
  4. based
  5. basic
  6. blob
  7. box
  8. boxes
  9. build
  10. care
  11. caregivers
  12. changing
  13. charts
  14. check
  15. college
  16. color
  17. confusing
  18. dad
  19. daughter
  20. dementia
  21. draw
  22. engage
  23. enjoy
  24. familiar
  25. father
  26. fill
  27. focusing
  28. forms
  29. friends
  30. frightening
  31. fun
  32. give
  33. global
  34. graphs
  35. great
  36. hard
  37. harder
  38. health
  39. hobbies
  40. impossible
  41. journals
  42. knit
  43. laughter
  44. learn
  45. learned
  46. learning
  47. letting
  48. line
  49. live
  50. long
  51. lot
  52. margins
  53. numbers
  54. origami
  55. paperwork
  56. person
  57. physical
  58. professor
  59. put
  60. read
  61. reading
  62. researching
  63. scribble
  64. sign
  65. sit
  66. start
  67. state
  68. strength
  69. talks
  70. teaching
  71. television
  72. thinking
  73. thinks
  74. train
  75. training
  76. turned
  77. watch
  78. working
  79. write