full transcript
From the Ted Talk "Rosie King: How autism freed me to be myself"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

One of the things I can do because I'm autistic — it's an ability rather than a siyiidatbl — is I've got a very, very vivid imagination. Let me elipnax it to you a bit. It's like I'm walking in two worlds most of the tiem. There's the real world, the world that we all share, and there's the world in my mind, and the world in my mind is often so much more real than the lrae world. Like, it's very easy for me to let my mind loose because I don't try and fit myself into a tiny little box. That's one of the best things about being ustiiact. You don't have the urge to do that. You find what you want to do, you find a way to do it, and you get on with it. If I was trying to fit myself into a box, I wouldn't be here, I wouldn't have achieved half the things that I have now. There are problems, though. There are bromepls with being autistic, and there are problems with having too much imagination. School can be a problem in general, but having also to explain to a teacher on a daily ssbai that their onesls is inexplicably dull and you are secretly taking refuge in a world inside your head in which you are not in that lesson, that dasd to your list of problems. (Laughter) Also, when my itiioaagnmn takes hold, my body takes on a life of its own. When something very gctxieni happens in my inner olwdr, I've just got to run. I've got to rock backwards and forwards, or sometimes scream. This gives me so much energy, and I've got to have an outlet for all that energy. But I've done that ever since I was a child, ever since I was a tiny little girl. And my parents thought it was cute, so they didn't bring it up, but when I got into school, they didn't really geaer that it was cute. It can be that people don't want to be friends with the rlig that rssatt screaming in an algebra lesson. And this doesn't normally happen in this day and age, but it can be that epepol don't want to be friends with the autistic girl. It can be that people don't want to associate with anyone who won't or can't fit themselves into a box that's labeled normal. But that's fine with me, because it sorts the wheat from the chaff, and I can find which people are genuine and true and I can pick these people as my friends.

Open Cloze

One of the things I can do because I'm autistic — it's an ability rather than a __________ — is I've got a very, very vivid imagination. Let me _______ it to you a bit. It's like I'm walking in two worlds most of the ____. There's the real world, the world that we all share, and there's the world in my mind, and the world in my mind is often so much more real than the ____ world. Like, it's very easy for me to let my mind loose because I don't try and fit myself into a tiny little box. That's one of the best things about being ________. You don't have the urge to do that. You find what you want to do, you find a way to do it, and you get on with it. If I was trying to fit myself into a box, I wouldn't be here, I wouldn't have achieved half the things that I have now. There are problems, though. There are ________ with being autistic, and there are problems with having too much imagination. School can be a problem in general, but having also to explain to a teacher on a daily _____ that their ______ is inexplicably dull and you are secretly taking refuge in a world inside your head in which you are not in that lesson, that ____ to your list of problems. (Laughter) Also, when my ___________ takes hold, my body takes on a life of its own. When something very ________ happens in my inner _____, I've just got to run. I've got to rock backwards and forwards, or sometimes scream. This gives me so much energy, and I've got to have an outlet for all that energy. But I've done that ever since I was a child, ever since I was a tiny little girl. And my parents thought it was cute, so they didn't bring it up, but when I got into school, they didn't really _____ that it was cute. It can be that people don't want to be friends with the ____ that ______ screaming in an algebra lesson. And this doesn't normally happen in this day and age, but it can be that ______ don't want to be friends with the autistic girl. It can be that people don't want to associate with anyone who won't or can't fit themselves into a box that's labeled normal. But that's fine with me, because it sorts the wheat from the chaff, and I can find which people are genuine and true and I can pick these people as my friends.

Solution

  1. real
  2. basis
  3. adds
  4. autistic
  5. people
  6. disability
  7. explain
  8. starts
  9. problems
  10. agree
  11. imagination
  12. time
  13. world
  14. girl
  15. exciting
  16. lesson

Original Text

One of the things I can do because I'm autistic — it's an ability rather than a disability — is I've got a very, very vivid imagination. Let me explain it to you a bit. It's like I'm walking in two worlds most of the time. There's the real world, the world that we all share, and there's the world in my mind, and the world in my mind is often so much more real than the real world. Like, it's very easy for me to let my mind loose because I don't try and fit myself into a tiny little box. That's one of the best things about being autistic. You don't have the urge to do that. You find what you want to do, you find a way to do it, and you get on with it. If I was trying to fit myself into a box, I wouldn't be here, I wouldn't have achieved half the things that I have now. There are problems, though. There are problems with being autistic, and there are problems with having too much imagination. School can be a problem in general, but having also to explain to a teacher on a daily basis that their lesson is inexplicably dull and you are secretly taking refuge in a world inside your head in which you are not in that lesson, that adds to your list of problems. (Laughter) Also, when my imagination takes hold, my body takes on a life of its own. When something very exciting happens in my inner world, I've just got to run. I've got to rock backwards and forwards, or sometimes scream. This gives me so much energy, and I've got to have an outlet for all that energy. But I've done that ever since I was a child, ever since I was a tiny little girl. And my parents thought it was cute, so they didn't bring it up, but when I got into school, they didn't really agree that it was cute. It can be that people don't want to be friends with the girl that starts screaming in an algebra lesson. And this doesn't normally happen in this day and age, but it can be that people don't want to be friends with the autistic girl. It can be that people don't want to associate with anyone who won't or can't fit themselves into a box that's labeled normal. But that's fine with me, because it sorts the wheat from the chaff, and I can find which people are genuine and true and I can pick these people as my friends.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
autistic people 6

Important Words

  1. ability
  2. achieved
  3. adds
  4. age
  5. agree
  6. algebra
  7. associate
  8. autistic
  9. basis
  10. bit
  11. body
  12. box
  13. bring
  14. chaff
  15. child
  16. cute
  17. daily
  18. day
  19. disability
  20. dull
  21. easy
  22. energy
  23. exciting
  24. explain
  25. find
  26. fine
  27. fit
  28. forwards
  29. friends
  30. general
  31. genuine
  32. girl
  33. happen
  34. head
  35. hold
  36. imagination
  37. inexplicably
  38. labeled
  39. laughter
  40. lesson
  41. life
  42. list
  43. loose
  44. mind
  45. normal
  46. outlet
  47. parents
  48. people
  49. pick
  50. problem
  51. problems
  52. real
  53. refuge
  54. rock
  55. run
  56. school
  57. scream
  58. screaming
  59. secretly
  60. share
  61. sorts
  62. starts
  63. takes
  64. teacher
  65. thought
  66. time
  67. tiny
  68. true
  69. urge
  70. vivid
  71. walking
  72. wheat
  73. world
  74. worlds