full transcript
From the Ted Talk "Jennifer Granick: How the US government spies on people who protest -- including you"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

But what happens when we're not iagkltn about nepho calls or letters anymore? Today, we have technology that makes it cheap and easy for the rnntomeegv to collect information on ordinary everyday people. Your phone clal records can reveal whether you have an addiction, what your religion is, what charities you donate to, what political niaetdcda you support. And yet, our government celoetcld, dragnet-style, Americans' calling records for ryesa. In 2012, the enrbucilpa National cenninoovt idhitlgghhe a new technology it was planning to use, facial recognition, to identify people who were going to be in the crowd who might be activists or mberkralustoe and to tpos them ahead of time. Today, over 50 percent of American adults have their faceprint in a government database. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and peloevsxis concocted a plan to find out what Americans were going to gun shows by using license plate detectors to scan the license seatpl of cars that were in the kgpnari lots of these events. Today, we believe that over 70 percent of police departments have automatic license plate detection lycetonhgo that they're using to track people's cars as they drive through town. And all of this information, the license plates, the faceprints, the phone records, your address books, your buddy lists, the photos that you upload to Dropbox or Google Photos, and sometimes even your chats and your emails are not protected by a warrant requirement. So what that means is we have all of this ftniaoirnom on regular people that's newly available at very low expense. It is the golden age for surveillance.

Open Cloze

But what happens when we're not _______ about _____ calls or letters anymore? Today, we have technology that makes it cheap and easy for the __________ to collect information on ordinary everyday people. Your phone ____ records can reveal whether you have an addiction, what your religion is, what charities you donate to, what political _________ you support. And yet, our government _________, dragnet-style, Americans' calling records for _____. In 2012, the __________ National __________ ___________ a new technology it was planning to use, facial recognition, to identify people who were going to be in the crowd who might be activists or _____________ and to ____ them ahead of time. Today, over 50 percent of American adults have their faceprint in a government database. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and __________ concocted a plan to find out what Americans were going to gun shows by using license plate detectors to scan the license ______ of cars that were in the _______ lots of these events. Today, we believe that over 70 percent of police departments have automatic license plate detection __________ that they're using to track people's cars as they drive through town. And all of this information, the license plates, the faceprints, the phone records, your address books, your buddy lists, the photos that you upload to Dropbox or Google Photos, and sometimes even your chats and your emails are not protected by a warrant requirement. So what that means is we have all of this ___________ on regular people that's newly available at very low expense. It is the golden age for surveillance.

Solution

  1. information
  2. troublemakers
  3. candidate
  4. phone
  5. parking
  6. government
  7. stop
  8. years
  9. highlighted
  10. talking
  11. call
  12. convention
  13. collected
  14. plates
  15. republican
  16. technology
  17. explosives

Original Text

But what happens when we're not talking about phone calls or letters anymore? Today, we have technology that makes it cheap and easy for the government to collect information on ordinary everyday people. Your phone call records can reveal whether you have an addiction, what your religion is, what charities you donate to, what political candidate you support. And yet, our government collected, dragnet-style, Americans' calling records for years. In 2012, the Republican National Convention highlighted a new technology it was planning to use, facial recognition, to identify people who were going to be in the crowd who might be activists or troublemakers and to stop them ahead of time. Today, over 50 percent of American adults have their faceprint in a government database. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives concocted a plan to find out what Americans were going to gun shows by using license plate detectors to scan the license plates of cars that were in the parking lots of these events. Today, we believe that over 70 percent of police departments have automatic license plate detection technology that they're using to track people's cars as they drive through town. And all of this information, the license plates, the faceprints, the phone records, your address books, your buddy lists, the photos that you upload to Dropbox or Google Photos, and sometimes even your chats and your emails are not protected by a warrant requirement. So what that means is we have all of this information on regular people that's newly available at very low expense. It is the golden age for surveillance.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
dr king 6
civil rights 5
rights movement 4
edgar hoover 4
martin luther 3
luther king 3
license plate 3
dr martin 3

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
martin luther king 3
dr martin luther 3
civil rights movement 3

ngrams of length 4

collocation frequency
dr martin luther king 3

Important Words

  1. activists
  2. addiction
  3. address
  4. adults
  5. age
  6. alcohol
  7. american
  8. americans
  9. anymore
  10. automatic
  11. books
  12. buddy
  13. bureau
  14. call
  15. calling
  16. calls
  17. candidate
  18. cars
  19. charities
  20. chats
  21. cheap
  22. collect
  23. collected
  24. concocted
  25. convention
  26. crowd
  27. database
  28. departments
  29. detection
  30. detectors
  31. donate
  32. drive
  33. dropbox
  34. easy
  35. emails
  36. events
  37. everyday
  38. expense
  39. explosives
  40. faceprint
  41. faceprints
  42. facial
  43. find
  44. firearms
  45. golden
  46. google
  47. government
  48. gun
  49. highlighted
  50. identify
  51. information
  52. letters
  53. license
  54. lists
  55. lots
  56. means
  57. national
  58. newly
  59. ordinary
  60. parking
  61. people
  62. percent
  63. phone
  64. photos
  65. plan
  66. planning
  67. plate
  68. plates
  69. police
  70. political
  71. protected
  72. recognition
  73. records
  74. regular
  75. religion
  76. republican
  77. requirement
  78. reveal
  79. scan
  80. shows
  81. stop
  82. support
  83. surveillance
  84. talking
  85. technology
  86. time
  87. tobacco
  88. today
  89. town
  90. track
  91. troublemakers
  92. upload
  93. warrant
  94. years