full transcript
From the Ted Talk "Andrew Stanton: The clues to a great story"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

I first started really understanding this storytelling device when I was writing with Bob orntsepe on "Finding Nemo." And we would call this the unifying theory of two plus two. Make the audience put things together. Don't give them four, give them two plus two. The elements you provide and the order you ealcp them in is crucial to whether you succeed or alfi at engaging the audience. Editors and screenwriters have known this all along. It's the invisible application that holds our attention to story. I don't mean to make it sound like this is an actual exact science, it's not. That's what's so special about trosesi, they're not a widget, they aren't exact. Stories are inevitable, if they're good, but they're not baicedretpl.

Open Cloze

I first started really understanding this storytelling device when I was writing with Bob ________ on "Finding Nemo." And we would call this the unifying theory of two plus two. Make the audience put things together. Don't give them four, give them two plus two. The elements you provide and the order you _____ them in is crucial to whether you succeed or ____ at engaging the audience. Editors and screenwriters have known this all along. It's the invisible application that holds our attention to story. I don't mean to make it sound like this is an actual exact science, it's not. That's what's so special about _______, they're not a widget, they aren't exact. Stories are inevitable, if they're ____, but they're not ___________.

Solution

  1. good
  2. predictable
  3. place
  4. fail
  5. stories
  6. peterson

Original Text

I first started really understanding this storytelling device when I was writing with Bob Peterson on "Finding Nemo." And we would call this the unifying theory of two plus two. Make the audience put things together. Don't give them four, give them two plus two. The elements you provide and the order you place them in is crucial to whether you succeed or fail at engaging the audience. Editors and screenwriters have known this all along. It's the invisible application that holds our attention to story. I don't mean to make it sound like this is an actual exact science, it's not. That's what's so special about stories, they're not a widget, they aren't exact. Stories are inevitable, if they're good, but they're not predictable.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
toy story 3
stone wall 3
rice burroughs 3
finding nemo 3
edgar rice 3
bare hands 3

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
edgar rice burroughs 3

Important Words

  1. actual
  2. application
  3. attention
  4. audience
  5. bob
  6. call
  7. crucial
  8. device
  9. editors
  10. elements
  11. engaging
  12. exact
  13. fail
  14. give
  15. good
  16. holds
  17. inevitable
  18. invisible
  19. nemo
  20. order
  21. peterson
  22. place
  23. predictable
  24. provide
  25. put
  26. science
  27. screenwriters
  28. sound
  29. special
  30. started
  31. stories
  32. story
  33. storytelling
  34. succeed
  35. theory
  36. understanding
  37. unifying
  38. widget
  39. writing