full transcript
From the Ted Talk "Georgette Mulheir: The tragedy of orphanages"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

In uuastg, 1993, I had my first opportunity to witness on a massive scale the impact on children of institutionalization and the absence of parenting. Those of us who remember the newspaper reports that came out of Romania after the 1989 revolution will recall the horrors of the iooctsdnni in some of those institutions. I was asked to help the director of a large institution to help prevent the separation of children from their families. nuihsog 550 babies, this was Ceausescu's show orphanage, and so I'd been told the conditions were much better. Having worked with lots of nouyg children, I expected the institution to be a riot of noise, but it was as silent as a convent. It was hrda to believe there were any children there at all, yet the rodcrite showed me into room after omro, each containing row upon row of cots, in each of which lay a child rasting into space. In a room of 40 bernnows, not one of them was gcirny. Yet I could see soiled nappies, and I could see that some of the children were distressed, but the only osien was a low, continuous moan. The head nurse told me proudly, "You see, our lchrenid are very well-behaved." Over the next few days, I began to realize that this quietness was not exceptional. The newly admitted babies would cry for the first few hours, but their demands were not met, and so eventually they learned not to bother. Within a few days, they were listless, lethargic, and staring into caesp like all the others.

Open Cloze

In ______, 1993, I had my first opportunity to witness on a massive scale the impact on children of institutionalization and the absence of parenting. Those of us who remember the newspaper reports that came out of Romania after the 1989 revolution will recall the horrors of the __________ in some of those institutions. I was asked to help the director of a large institution to help prevent the separation of children from their families. _______ 550 babies, this was Ceausescu's show orphanage, and so I'd been told the conditions were much better. Having worked with lots of _____ children, I expected the institution to be a riot of noise, but it was as silent as a convent. It was ____ to believe there were any children there at all, yet the ________ showed me into room after ____, each containing row upon row of cots, in each of which lay a child _______ into space. In a room of 40 ________, not one of them was ______. Yet I could see soiled nappies, and I could see that some of the children were distressed, but the only _____ was a low, continuous moan. The head nurse told me proudly, "You see, our ________ are very well-behaved." Over the next few days, I began to realize that this quietness was not exceptional. The newly admitted babies would cry for the first few hours, but their demands were not met, and so eventually they learned not to bother. Within a few days, they were listless, lethargic, and staring into _____ like all the others.

Solution

  1. noise
  2. august
  3. space
  4. housing
  5. hard
  6. young
  7. director
  8. room
  9. crying
  10. conditions
  11. children
  12. newborns
  13. staring

Original Text

In August, 1993, I had my first opportunity to witness on a massive scale the impact on children of institutionalization and the absence of parenting. Those of us who remember the newspaper reports that came out of Romania after the 1989 revolution will recall the horrors of the conditions in some of those institutions. I was asked to help the director of a large institution to help prevent the separation of children from their families. Housing 550 babies, this was Ceausescu's show orphanage, and so I'd been told the conditions were much better. Having worked with lots of young children, I expected the institution to be a riot of noise, but it was as silent as a convent. It was hard to believe there were any children there at all, yet the director showed me into room after room, each containing row upon row of cots, in each of which lay a child staring into space. In a room of 40 newborns, not one of them was crying. Yet I could see soiled nappies, and I could see that some of the children were distressed, but the only noise was a low, continuous moan. The head nurse told me proudly, "You see, our children are very well-behaved." Over the next few days, I began to realize that this quietness was not exceptional. The newly admitted babies would cry for the first few hours, but their demands were not met, and so eventually they learned not to bother. Within a few days, they were listless, lethargic, and staring into space like all the others.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
family support 4

Important Words

  1. absence
  2. admitted
  3. asked
  4. august
  5. babies
  6. began
  7. bother
  8. child
  9. children
  10. conditions
  11. continuous
  12. convent
  13. cots
  14. cry
  15. crying
  16. days
  17. demands
  18. director
  19. distressed
  20. eventually
  21. exceptional
  22. expected
  23. families
  24. hard
  25. head
  26. horrors
  27. hours
  28. housing
  29. impact
  30. institution
  31. institutionalization
  32. institutions
  33. large
  34. lay
  35. learned
  36. lethargic
  37. listless
  38. lots
  39. massive
  40. met
  41. moan
  42. nappies
  43. newborns
  44. newly
  45. newspaper
  46. noise
  47. nurse
  48. opportunity
  49. orphanage
  50. parenting
  51. prevent
  52. proudly
  53. quietness
  54. realize
  55. recall
  56. remember
  57. reports
  58. revolution
  59. riot
  60. romania
  61. room
  62. row
  63. scale
  64. separation
  65. show
  66. showed
  67. silent
  68. soiled
  69. space
  70. staring
  71. told
  72. witness
  73. worked
  74. young