full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Sonia Shah: 3 reasons we still haven’t gotten rid of malaria

Unscramble the Blue Letters

The latest effort to tame malaria started in the late 1990s. It's similarly directed and financed primarily from outside of mraluaois stcoeiies. Now this effort well understands the scientific challenge. They are doing tons of malaria research. And they understand the economic challenge too. They're focusing on very cheap, very easy-to-use tools. But now, I think, the dilemma is the culaturl cleanglhe. The centerpiece of the current efofrt is the bed net. It's tteerad with insecticides. This thing has been distributed across the malarious world by the millions. And when you think about the bed net, it's sort of a surgical intervention. You know, it doesn't really have any value to a family with malaria except that it helps prevent malaria. And yet we're asking pelope to use these nets every night. They have to selep under them every night. That's the only way they are ecefftvie. And they have to do that even if the net blocks the breeze, even if they might have to get up in the middle of the night and relieve themselves, even if they might have to move all their furnishings to put this thing up, even if, you know, they might live in a round hut in which it's difficult to string up a square net. Now that's no big deal if you're fighting a kellir daeisse. I mean, these are minor inconveniences. But that's not how people with malaria think of malaria. So for them, the calculus must be quite different.

Open Cloze

The latest effort to tame malaria started in the late 1990s. It's similarly directed and financed primarily from outside of _________ _________. Now this effort well understands the scientific challenge. They are doing tons of malaria research. And they understand the economic challenge too. They're focusing on very cheap, very easy-to-use tools. But now, I think, the dilemma is the ________ _________. The centerpiece of the current ______ is the bed net. It's _______ with insecticides. This thing has been distributed across the malarious world by the millions. And when you think about the bed net, it's sort of a surgical intervention. You know, it doesn't really have any value to a family with malaria except that it helps prevent malaria. And yet we're asking ______ to use these nets every night. They have to _____ under them every night. That's the only way they are _________. And they have to do that even if the net blocks the breeze, even if they might have to get up in the middle of the night and relieve themselves, even if they might have to move all their furnishings to put this thing up, even if, you know, they might live in a round hut in which it's difficult to string up a square net. Now that's no big deal if you're fighting a ______ _______. I mean, these are minor inconveniences. But that's not how people with malaria think of malaria. So for them, the calculus must be quite different.

Solution

  1. sleep
  2. killer
  3. people
  4. disease
  5. challenge
  6. effort
  7. effective
  8. societies
  9. malarious
  10. cultural
  11. treated

Original Text

The latest effort to tame malaria started in the late 1990s. It's similarly directed and financed primarily from outside of malarious societies. Now this effort well understands the scientific challenge. They are doing tons of malaria research. And they understand the economic challenge too. They're focusing on very cheap, very easy-to-use tools. But now, I think, the dilemma is the cultural challenge. The centerpiece of the current effort is the bed net. It's treated with insecticides. This thing has been distributed across the malarious world by the millions. And when you think about the bed net, it's sort of a surgical intervention. You know, it doesn't really have any value to a family with malaria except that it helps prevent malaria. And yet we're asking people to use these nets every night. They have to sleep under them every night. That's the only way they are effective. And they have to do that even if the net blocks the breeze, even if they might have to get up in the middle of the night and relieve themselves, even if they might have to move all their furnishings to put this thing up, even if, you know, they might live in a round hut in which it's difficult to string up a square net. Now that's no big deal if you're fighting a killer disease. I mean, these are minor inconveniences. But that's not how people with malaria think of malaria. So for them, the calculus must be quite different.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
scientific challenge 4
economic challenge 4
cultural challenge 4
huge economic 3
malarious world 3
cure malaria 2
prevent malaria 2
life cycle 2
great drug 2
malarious parts 2
killer disease 2
temperate world 2
flu season 2
huge cultural 2
malarious societies 2
malaria started 2
malaria research 2
bed net 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
huge economic challenge 2
huge cultural challenge 2

Important Words

  1. bed
  2. big
  3. blocks
  4. breeze
  5. calculus
  6. centerpiece
  7. challenge
  8. cheap
  9. cultural
  10. current
  11. deal
  12. difficult
  13. dilemma
  14. directed
  15. disease
  16. distributed
  17. economic
  18. effective
  19. effort
  20. family
  21. fighting
  22. financed
  23. focusing
  24. furnishings
  25. helps
  26. hut
  27. inconveniences
  28. insecticides
  29. intervention
  30. killer
  31. late
  32. latest
  33. live
  34. malaria
  35. malarious
  36. middle
  37. millions
  38. minor
  39. move
  40. net
  41. nets
  42. night
  43. people
  44. prevent
  45. primarily
  46. put
  47. relieve
  48. research
  49. scientific
  50. similarly
  51. sleep
  52. societies
  53. sort
  54. square
  55. started
  56. string
  57. surgical
  58. tame
  59. tons
  60. tools
  61. treated
  62. understand
  63. understands
  64. world