full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Tom Chatfield: 7 ways games reward the brain"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

This sounds immensely boring but games are able to make this process incredibly compelling. And the way they do this is through a combination of piroailbtby and data. Let's think about probability. If we want to egngae someone in the process of opening boxes to try and find pies, we want to make sure it's neither too easy, nor too difficult, to find a pie. So what do you do? Well, you look at a million people — no, 100 moililn people, 100 million box openers — and you work out, if you make the pie rate about 25 percent — that's neither too frustrating, nor too easy. It keeps people eangegd. But of course, that's not all you do — there's 15 pies. Now, I could make a game called Piecraft, where all you had to do was get a million pies or a thousand pies. That would be very brniog. fitefen is a pretty optimal number. You find that — you know, between five and 20 is about the right number for kepnieg people going. But we don't just have pies in the bexos. There's 100 percent up here. And what we do is make sure that every time a box is oepend, there's something in it, some little reward that keeps people progressing and engaged. In most adventure games, it's a little bit in-game currency, a little bit experience. But we don't just do that either.

Open Cloze

This sounds immensely boring but games are able to make this process incredibly compelling. And the way they do this is through a combination of ___________ and data. Let's think about probability. If we want to ______ someone in the process of opening boxes to try and find pies, we want to make sure it's neither too easy, nor too difficult, to find a pie. So what do you do? Well, you look at a million people — no, 100 _______ people, 100 million box openers — and you work out, if you make the pie rate about 25 percent — that's neither too frustrating, nor too easy. It keeps people _______. But of course, that's not all you do — there's 15 pies. Now, I could make a game called Piecraft, where all you had to do was get a million pies or a thousand pies. That would be very ______. _______ is a pretty optimal number. You find that — you know, between five and 20 is about the right number for _______ people going. But we don't just have pies in the _____. There's 100 percent up here. And what we do is make sure that every time a box is ______, there's something in it, some little reward that keeps people progressing and engaged. In most adventure games, it's a little bit in-game currency, a little bit experience. But we don't just do that either.

Solution

  1. keeping
  2. engaged
  3. million
  4. opened
  5. fifteen
  6. boxes
  7. boring
  8. engage
  9. probability

Original Text

This sounds immensely boring but games are able to make this process incredibly compelling. And the way they do this is through a combination of probability and data. Let's think about probability. If we want to engage someone in the process of opening boxes to try and find pies, we want to make sure it's neither too easy, nor too difficult, to find a pie. So what do you do? Well, you look at a million people — no, 100 million people, 100 million box openers — and you work out, if you make the pie rate about 25 percent — that's neither too frustrating, nor too easy. It keeps people engaged. But of course, that's not all you do — there's 15 pies. Now, I could make a game called Piecraft, where all you had to do was get a million pies or a thousand pies. That would be very boring. Fifteen is a pretty optimal number. You find that — you know, between five and 20 is about the right number for keeping people going. But we don't just have pies in the boxes. There's 100 percent up here. And what we do is make sure that every time a box is opened, there's something in it, some little reward that keeps people progressing and engaged. In most adventure games, it's a little bit in-game currency, a little bit experience. But we don't just do that either.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
opening boxes 3
video game 3
video games 3
percent chance 3

Important Words

  1. adventure
  2. bit
  3. boring
  4. box
  5. boxes
  6. called
  7. combination
  8. compelling
  9. currency
  10. data
  11. difficult
  12. easy
  13. engage
  14. engaged
  15. experience
  16. fifteen
  17. find
  18. frustrating
  19. game
  20. games
  21. immensely
  22. incredibly
  23. keeping
  24. million
  25. number
  26. opened
  27. openers
  28. opening
  29. optimal
  30. people
  31. percent
  32. pie
  33. piecraft
  34. pies
  35. pretty
  36. probability
  37. process
  38. progressing
  39. rate
  40. reward
  41. sounds
  42. thousand
  43. time
  44. work