full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Toni Griffin: A new vision for rebuilding Detroit"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

So that qoituesn is really powerful, and it was certainly powerful to us in the moment, when you connect it to the stories that some Detroiters had, and actually a lot of African-Americans' families have had that are living in Midwestern cities like Detroit. Many of them told us the sitores about how they came to own their home through their grandparents or great-grandparents, who were one of 1.6 million people who migrated from the rraul South to the industrial North, as depicted in this painting by Jacob Lawrence, "The geart Migration." They came to Detroit for a better way of life. Many found work in the automobile industry, the Ford Motor Company, as depicted in this mural by dgieo Rivera in the Detroit ittuniste of Art. The fruits of their labors would affrod them a home, for many the first piece of ptrepory that they would ever know, and a community with other first-time African-American home beyrus. The first couple of decades of their life in the North is quite well, up until about 1950, which coincides with the city's peak population at 1.8 million people. Now it's at this time that Detroit begins to see a second kind of migration, a migration to the suburbs. Between 1950 and 2000, the region grows by 30 percent. But this time, the migration leaves African-Americans in place, as families and businesses flee the city, lvinaeg the city pretty dlsteoae of ppeloe as well as jobs. During that same period, between 1950 and 2000, 2010, the city loses 60 percent of its pouilptaon, and today it horves at above 700,000.

Open Cloze

So that ________ is really powerful, and it was certainly powerful to us in the moment, when you connect it to the stories that some Detroiters had, and actually a lot of African-Americans' families have had that are living in Midwestern cities like Detroit. Many of them told us the _______ about how they came to own their home through their grandparents or great-grandparents, who were one of 1.6 million people who migrated from the _____ South to the industrial North, as depicted in this painting by Jacob Lawrence, "The _____ Migration." They came to Detroit for a better way of life. Many found work in the automobile industry, the Ford Motor Company, as depicted in this mural by _____ Rivera in the Detroit _________ of Art. The fruits of their labors would ______ them a home, for many the first piece of ________ that they would ever know, and a community with other first-time African-American home ______. The first couple of decades of their life in the North is quite well, up until about 1950, which coincides with the city's peak population at 1.8 million people. Now it's at this time that Detroit begins to see a second kind of migration, a migration to the suburbs. Between 1950 and 2000, the region grows by 30 percent. But this time, the migration leaves African-Americans in place, as families and businesses flee the city, _______ the city pretty ________ of ______ as well as jobs. During that same period, between 1950 and 2000, 2010, the city loses 60 percent of its __________, and today it ______ at above 700,000.

Solution

  1. hovers
  2. institute
  3. population
  4. question
  5. people
  6. leaving
  7. stories
  8. desolate
  9. great
  10. rural
  11. diego
  12. buyers
  13. property
  14. afford

Original Text

So that question is really powerful, and it was certainly powerful to us in the moment, when you connect it to the stories that some Detroiters had, and actually a lot of African-Americans' families have had that are living in Midwestern cities like Detroit. Many of them told us the stories about how they came to own their home through their grandparents or great-grandparents, who were one of 1.6 million people who migrated from the rural South to the industrial North, as depicted in this painting by Jacob Lawrence, "The Great Migration." They came to Detroit for a better way of life. Many found work in the automobile industry, the Ford Motor Company, as depicted in this mural by Diego Rivera in the Detroit Institute of Art. The fruits of their labors would afford them a home, for many the first piece of property that they would ever know, and a community with other first-time African-American home buyers. The first couple of decades of their life in the North is quite well, up until about 1950, which coincides with the city's peak population at 1.8 million people. Now it's at this time that Detroit begins to see a second kind of migration, a migration to the suburbs. Between 1950 and 2000, the region grows by 30 percent. But this time, the migration leaves African-Americans in place, as families and businesses flee the city, leaving the city pretty desolate of people as well as jobs. During that same period, between 1950 and 2000, 2010, the city loses 60 percent of its population, and today it hovers at above 700,000.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
african american 3
vacant land 3
great migration 3
square miles 3
planning process 3

Important Words

  1. afford
  2. art
  3. automobile
  4. begins
  5. businesses
  6. buyers
  7. cities
  8. city
  9. coincides
  10. community
  11. company
  12. connect
  13. couple
  14. decades
  15. depicted
  16. desolate
  17. detroit
  18. detroiters
  19. diego
  20. families
  21. flee
  22. ford
  23. fruits
  24. grandparents
  25. great
  26. grows
  27. home
  28. hovers
  29. industrial
  30. industry
  31. institute
  32. jacob
  33. jobs
  34. kind
  35. labors
  36. lawrence
  37. leaves
  38. leaving
  39. life
  40. living
  41. loses
  42. lot
  43. midwestern
  44. migrated
  45. migration
  46. million
  47. moment
  48. motor
  49. mural
  50. north
  51. painting
  52. peak
  53. people
  54. percent
  55. period
  56. piece
  57. place
  58. population
  59. powerful
  60. pretty
  61. property
  62. question
  63. region
  64. rivera
  65. rural
  66. south
  67. stories
  68. suburbs
  69. time
  70. today
  71. told
  72. work