full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Ajit Narayanan: A word game to communicate in any language"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

And so after I developed Avaz, I worried for a very long time about how I could give grammar to children with autism. The solution came to me from a very interesting perspective. I heepnapd to chance upon a child with autism conversing with her mom, and this is what happened. Completely out of the blue, very spontaneously, the child got up and said, "Eat." Now what was interesting was the way in which the mom was trying to tease out the meaning of what the child wanted to say by talking to her in questions. So she asked, "Eat what? Do you want to eat ice cream? You want to eat? Somebody else wants to eat? You want to eat ceram now? You want to eat ice cream in the evening?" And then it struck me that what the mother had done was something incredible. She had been able to get that clhid to communicate an idea to her without gaarmmr. And it struck me that maybe this is what I was looking for. Instead of arranging words in an order, in sequence, as a sentence, you arrange them in this map, where they're all linked together not by placing them one after the other but in questions, in question-answer pairs. And so if you do this, then what you're conveying is not a sentence in eilgnsh, but what you're conveying is really a maennig, the meaning of a sentence in English. Now, meaning is really the uebnreldly, in some sense, of language. It's what comes after tohhugt but before language. And the idea was that this particular reireostpteann might cnovey meaning in its raw form.

Open Cloze

And so after I developed Avaz, I worried for a very long time about how I could give grammar to children with autism. The solution came to me from a very interesting perspective. I ________ to chance upon a child with autism conversing with her mom, and this is what happened. Completely out of the blue, very spontaneously, the child got up and said, "Eat." Now what was interesting was the way in which the mom was trying to tease out the meaning of what the child wanted to say by talking to her in questions. So she asked, "Eat what? Do you want to eat ice cream? You want to eat? Somebody else wants to eat? You want to eat _____ now? You want to eat ice cream in the evening?" And then it struck me that what the mother had done was something incredible. She had been able to get that _____ to communicate an idea to her without _______. And it struck me that maybe this is what I was looking for. Instead of arranging words in an order, in sequence, as a sentence, you arrange them in this map, where they're all linked together not by placing them one after the other but in questions, in question-answer pairs. And so if you do this, then what you're conveying is not a sentence in _______, but what you're conveying is really a _______, the meaning of a sentence in English. Now, meaning is really the __________, in some sense, of language. It's what comes after _______ but before language. And the idea was that this particular ______________ might ______ meaning in its raw form.

Solution

  1. underbelly
  2. meaning
  3. convey
  4. cream
  5. happened
  6. representation
  7. english
  8. thought
  9. grammar
  10. child

Original Text

And so after I developed Avaz, I worried for a very long time about how I could give grammar to children with autism. The solution came to me from a very interesting perspective. I happened to chance upon a child with autism conversing with her mom, and this is what happened. Completely out of the blue, very spontaneously, the child got up and said, "Eat." Now what was interesting was the way in which the mom was trying to tease out the meaning of what the child wanted to say by talking to her in questions. So she asked, "Eat what? Do you want to eat ice cream? You want to eat? Somebody else wants to eat? You want to eat cream now? You want to eat ice cream in the evening?" And then it struck me that what the mother had done was something incredible. She had been able to get that child to communicate an idea to her without grammar. And it struck me that maybe this is what I was looking for. Instead of arranging words in an order, in sequence, as a sentence, you arrange them in this map, where they're all linked together not by placing them one after the other but in questions, in question-answer pairs. And so if you do this, then what you're conveying is not a sentence in English, but what you're conveying is really a meaning, the meaning of a sentence in English. Now, meaning is really the underbelly, in some sense, of language. It's what comes after thought but before language. And the idea was that this particular representation might convey meaning in its raw form.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
data structure 3

Important Words

  1. arrange
  2. arranging
  3. asked
  4. autism
  5. avaz
  6. blue
  7. chance
  8. child
  9. children
  10. communicate
  11. completely
  12. conversing
  13. convey
  14. conveying
  15. cream
  16. developed
  17. eat
  18. english
  19. evening
  20. form
  21. give
  22. grammar
  23. happened
  24. ice
  25. idea
  26. incredible
  27. interesting
  28. language
  29. linked
  30. long
  31. map
  32. meaning
  33. mom
  34. mother
  35. order
  36. pairs
  37. perspective
  38. placing
  39. questions
  40. raw
  41. representation
  42. sense
  43. sentence
  44. sequence
  45. solution
  46. spontaneously
  47. struck
  48. talking
  49. tease
  50. thought
  51. time
  52. underbelly
  53. wanted
  54. words
  55. worried