full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Andrew Fitzgerald: Adventures in Twitter fiction

Unscramble the Blue Letters

This is a sroht story by the author Jennifer Egan called "Black Box." It was ognilrilay witrten specifically with Twitter in mind. Egan convinced The New Yorker to start a New Yorker fiction account from which they could tweet all of these lines that she created. Now Twitter, of course, has a 140-character limit. Egan mceokd that up just writing manually in this sytorobrad sketchbook, used the physical sapce constraints of those storyboard squares to write each individual tweet, and those tweets eendd up becoming over 600 of them that were szeliaired by The New ykroer. Every night, at 8 p.m., you could tune in to a short story from The New Yorker's fiction account. I think that's pretty exciting: tune-in literary fiction. The experience of Egan's story, of course, like anything on Twitter, there were multiple ways to experience it. You could scroll back through it, but interestingly, if you were watching it live, there was this suspense that bilut because the actual tweets, you had no control over when you would read them. They were coming at a pretty reulagr clip, but as the srtoy was building, normally, as a rdeaer, you control how fast you move through a text, but in this case, The New Yorker did, and they were sending you bit by bit by bit, and you had this suspense of waiting for the next line.

Open Cloze

This is a _____ story by the author Jennifer Egan called "Black Box." It was __________ _______ specifically with Twitter in mind. Egan convinced The New Yorker to start a New Yorker fiction account from which they could tweet all of these lines that she created. Now Twitter, of course, has a 140-character limit. Egan ______ that up just writing manually in this __________ sketchbook, used the physical _____ constraints of those storyboard squares to write each individual tweet, and those tweets _____ up becoming over 600 of them that were __________ by The New ______. Every night, at 8 p.m., you could tune in to a short story from The New Yorker's fiction account. I think that's pretty exciting: tune-in literary fiction. The experience of Egan's story, of course, like anything on Twitter, there were multiple ways to experience it. You could scroll back through it, but interestingly, if you were watching it live, there was this suspense that _____ because the actual tweets, you had no control over when you would read them. They were coming at a pretty _______ clip, but as the _____ was building, normally, as a ______, you control how fast you move through a text, but in this case, The New Yorker did, and they were sending you bit by bit by bit, and you had this suspense of waiting for the next line.

Solution

  1. mocked
  2. written
  3. regular
  4. reader
  5. ended
  6. yorker
  7. space
  8. serialized
  9. originally
  10. storyboard
  11. story
  12. built
  13. short

Original Text

This is a short story by the author Jennifer Egan called "Black Box." It was originally written specifically with Twitter in mind. Egan convinced The New Yorker to start a New Yorker fiction account from which they could tweet all of these lines that she created. Now Twitter, of course, has a 140-character limit. Egan mocked that up just writing manually in this storyboard sketchbook, used the physical space constraints of those storyboard squares to write each individual tweet, and those tweets ended up becoming over 600 of them that were serialized by The New Yorker. Every night, at 8 p.m., you could tune in to a short story from The New Yorker's fiction account. I think that's pretty exciting: tune-in literary fiction. The experience of Egan's story, of course, like anything on Twitter, there were multiple ways to experience it. You could scroll back through it, but interestingly, if you were watching it live, there was this suspense that built because the actual tweets, you had no control over when you would read them. They were coming at a pretty regular clip, but as the story was building, normally, as a reader, you control how fast you move through a text, but in this case, The New Yorker did, and they were sending you bit by bit by bit, and you had this suspense of waiting for the next line.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
short story 5
real world 4
crimer show 4
multiple perspectives 3
telling stories 2
flexible identity 2
single points 2
wide open 2
open frontier 2
story called 2
fiction account 2
parody account 2
twitter parody 2
show crimer 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
wide open frontier 2

Important Words

  1. account
  2. actual
  3. author
  4. bit
  5. box
  6. building
  7. built
  8. called
  9. case
  10. clip
  11. coming
  12. constraints
  13. control
  14. convinced
  15. created
  16. egan
  17. ended
  18. experience
  19. fast
  20. fiction
  21. individual
  22. interestingly
  23. jennifer
  24. limit
  25. line
  26. lines
  27. literary
  28. live
  29. manually
  30. mind
  31. mocked
  32. move
  33. multiple
  34. night
  35. originally
  36. physical
  37. pretty
  38. read
  39. reader
  40. regular
  41. scroll
  42. sending
  43. serialized
  44. short
  45. sketchbook
  46. space
  47. specifically
  48. squares
  49. start
  50. story
  51. storyboard
  52. suspense
  53. text
  54. tune
  55. tweet
  56. tweets
  57. twitter
  58. waiting
  59. watching
  60. ways
  61. write
  62. writing
  63. written
  64. yorker