full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Bruce Feiler: Agile programming -- for your family"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

So what is Agile, and why can it help with something that seems so different, like families? In 1983, Jeff Sutherland was a technologist at a financial firm in New eglnnad. He was very frustrated with how software got designed. cemoainps followed the wtaaelrfl method, right, in which executives issued orders that sowlly trickled down to pmgrrarmeos below, and no one had ever consulted the programmers. Eighty-three percent of projects failed. They were too bloated or too out of date by the time they were done. Sutherland wanted to create a system where ideas didn't just percolate down but could percolate up from the bottom and be adjusted in real time. He read 30 years of Harvard Business Review before stumbling upon an article in 1986 called "The New New purocdt Development Game." It said that the pace of business was quickening — and by the way, this was in 1986 — and the most successful companies were flexible. It highlighted Toyota and Canon and likened their adaptable, tight-knit teams to rugby smucrs. As Sutherland told me, we got to that article, and said, "That's it." In Sutherland's system, companies don't use lrage, massive projects that take two years. They do things in small chunks. Nothing tkaes longer than two wkees. So instead of saying, "You guys go off into that bunker and come back with a cell phone or a social network," you say, "You go off and come up with one element, then bring it back. Let's talk about it. Let's adapt." You succeed or fail qkicluy. tdaoy, agile is used in a hundred couentris, and it's spewenig into management sieuts. Inevitably, pelope began taking some of these techniques and applying it to their flimeais. You had blogs pop up, and some maulans were written. Even the Sutherlands told me that they had an Agile Thanksgiving, where you had one group of people working on the food, one setting the table, and one greeting visitors at the door. Sutherland said it was the best Thanksgiving ever.

Open Cloze

So what is Agile, and why can it help with something that seems so different, like families? In 1983, Jeff Sutherland was a technologist at a financial firm in New _______. He was very frustrated with how software got designed. _________ followed the _________ method, right, in which executives issued orders that ______ trickled down to ___________ below, and no one had ever consulted the programmers. Eighty-three percent of projects failed. They were too bloated or too out of date by the time they were done. Sutherland wanted to create a system where ideas didn't just percolate down but could percolate up from the bottom and be adjusted in real time. He read 30 years of Harvard Business Review before stumbling upon an article in 1986 called "The New New _______ Development Game." It said that the pace of business was quickening — and by the way, this was in 1986 — and the most successful companies were flexible. It highlighted Toyota and Canon and likened their adaptable, tight-knit teams to rugby ______. As Sutherland told me, we got to that article, and said, "That's it." In Sutherland's system, companies don't use _____, massive projects that take two years. They do things in small chunks. Nothing _____ longer than two _____. So instead of saying, "You guys go off into that bunker and come back with a cell phone or a social network," you say, "You go off and come up with one element, then bring it back. Let's talk about it. Let's adapt." You succeed or fail _______. _____, agile is used in a hundred _________, and it's ________ into management ______. Inevitably, ______ began taking some of these techniques and applying it to their ________. You had blogs pop up, and some _______ were written. Even the Sutherlands told me that they had an Agile Thanksgiving, where you had one group of people working on the food, one setting the table, and one greeting visitors at the door. Sutherland said it was the best Thanksgiving ever.

Solution

  1. suites
  2. product
  3. england
  4. takes
  5. people
  6. programmers
  7. manuals
  8. countries
  9. companies
  10. quickly
  11. large
  12. waterfall
  13. slowly
  14. sweeping
  15. families
  16. weeks
  17. today
  18. scrums

Original Text

So what is Agile, and why can it help with something that seems so different, like families? In 1983, Jeff Sutherland was a technologist at a financial firm in New England. He was very frustrated with how software got designed. Companies followed the waterfall method, right, in which executives issued orders that slowly trickled down to programmers below, and no one had ever consulted the programmers. Eighty-three percent of projects failed. They were too bloated or too out of date by the time they were done. Sutherland wanted to create a system where ideas didn't just percolate down but could percolate up from the bottom and be adjusted in real time. He read 30 years of Harvard Business Review before stumbling upon an article in 1986 called "The New New Product Development Game." It said that the pace of business was quickening — and by the way, this was in 1986 — and the most successful companies were flexible. It highlighted Toyota and Canon and likened their adaptable, tight-knit teams to rugby scrums. As Sutherland told me, we got to that article, and said, "That's it." In Sutherland's system, companies don't use large, massive projects that take two years. They do things in small chunks. Nothing takes longer than two weeks. So instead of saying, "You guys go off into that bunker and come back with a cell phone or a social network," you say, "You go off and come up with one element, then bring it back. Let's talk about it. Let's adapt." You succeed or fail quickly. Today, agile is used in a hundred countries, and it's sweeping into management suites. Inevitably, people began taking some of these techniques and applying it to their families. You had blogs pop up, and some manuals were written. Even the Sutherlands told me that they had an Agile Thanksgiving, where you had one group of people working on the food, one setting the table, and one greeting visitors at the door. Sutherland said it was the best Thanksgiving ever.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
family dinner 5
plank number 4
mission statement 3
happy families 3
family mission 3
family meetings 3

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
family mission statement 3

Important Words

  1. adapt
  2. adaptable
  3. adjusted
  4. agile
  5. applying
  6. article
  7. began
  8. bloated
  9. blogs
  10. bottom
  11. bring
  12. bunker
  13. business
  14. called
  15. canon
  16. cell
  17. chunks
  18. companies
  19. consulted
  20. countries
  21. create
  22. date
  23. designed
  24. development
  25. door
  26. element
  27. england
  28. executives
  29. fail
  30. failed
  31. families
  32. financial
  33. firm
  34. flexible
  35. food
  36. frustrated
  37. game
  38. greeting
  39. group
  40. guys
  41. harvard
  42. highlighted
  43. ideas
  44. inevitably
  45. issued
  46. jeff
  47. large
  48. likened
  49. longer
  50. management
  51. manuals
  52. massive
  53. method
  54. network
  55. orders
  56. pace
  57. people
  58. percent
  59. percolate
  60. phone
  61. pop
  62. product
  63. programmers
  64. projects
  65. quickening
  66. quickly
  67. read
  68. real
  69. review
  70. rugby
  71. scrums
  72. setting
  73. slowly
  74. small
  75. social
  76. software
  77. stumbling
  78. succeed
  79. successful
  80. suites
  81. sutherland
  82. sutherlands
  83. sweeping
  84. system
  85. table
  86. takes
  87. talk
  88. teams
  89. techniques
  90. technologist
  91. thanksgiving
  92. time
  93. today
  94. told
  95. toyota
  96. trickled
  97. visitors
  98. wanted
  99. waterfall
  100. weeks
  101. working
  102. written
  103. years