full transcript

From the Ted Talk by John Lloyd: An animated tour of the invisible

Unscramble the Blue Letters

(Circus muisc) [Ted N' Ed's Carnival] [John Lloyd's Inventory of the iilvnisbe] [Adapted from a TEDTalk given by John Lloyd in 2009] June Cohen: Our next skpaeer has spent his whole ceraer eliciting that ssene of wonder. Please welcome John Lloyd. (Applause) [Hall of Mirrors] The qsiutoen is, "What is invisible?" There's more of it than you think, actually. Everything, I would say — everything that matters — Except every thing, and except matter. We can see matter but we can't see what's the matter. We can see the stars and the planets but we can't see what hldos them apart, or what draws them together. With matter as with people, we see only the skin of things, we can't see into the engine room, we can't see what makes people tick, at least not without diitufflcy, and the closer we look at anything, the more it disappears. In fact, if you look really coslley at stuff, if you look at the basic substructure of matter, there isn't anything there. Electrons disappear in a kind of fuzz, and there is only energy. One of the interesting things about invisibility is, the things that we can's see, we also can't udsarntned. gavtiry is one thing that we can't see, and which we don't understand. It's the least understood of all the four fundamental forces, and the weseakt, and nobody really knows what it is or why it's there. For what it's worth, Sir Isaac Newton, the greatest scientist who ever lived, he thought Jesus came to Earth specifically to operate the levers of gravity. That's what he thgohut he was there for. So, brhigt guy, could be wrong on that one, I don't know. (Laughter) counsencsosis. I see all your faces; I've no idea what any of you are thinking. Isn't that amazing? Isn't it incredible that we can't read each other's midns, when we can tcouh each other, taste each other, perhaps, if we get close enough, but we can't read each other's minds. I find that quite astonishing. In the Sufi faith, this great Middle Eastern religion which some claim is the root of all religions, Sufi masters are all telepaths, so they say, but their main exercise of tahlpetey is to send out powerful signals to the rest of us that it doesn't eixst. So that's why we don't think it exists; the Sufi masters working on us. In the question of consciousness and artificial intelligence, artificial intelligence has really, like the study of consciousness, gotten nowhere, we have no idea how consciousness works. Not only have they not created artificial intelligence, they haven't yet created aariifctil stupidity. (Laughter) The laws of physics: invisible, eternal, omnipresent, all powerful. Remind you of anyone? Interesting. I'm, as you can gsues, not a materialist, I'm an immaterialist. And I've found a very useful new word — insotgic. Okay? I'm an ignostic. [God?] I rusefe to be drawn on the question on whether God etisxs until somebody properly defines the terms. Another thing we can't see is the human genome. And this is increasingly peculiar, because about 20 years ago when they searttd delving into the genome, they thought it would probably contain around 100 tshoanud geens. Every year since, it's been revised downwards. We now think there are likely to be just over 20 thousand genes in the human gmneoe. This is extraordinary, because rice — get this — rice is known to have 38 thousand genes. paotteos have 48 chromosomes, two more than people, and the same as a gorilla. (Laughter) You can't see these things, but they are very strange. The stars by day, I always think that's fascinating. The universe disappears. The more light there is, the less you can see. Time. Nobody can see time. I don't know if you know this. There's a big movement in modern physics to decide that time doesn't really exist, because it's too inconvenient for the figures. It's much easier if it's not really there. You can't see the future, obviously, and you can't see the past, except in your memory. One of the interesting things about the past is you particularly can't see — my son asked me this the other day, "Dad, can you remember what I was like when I was two? And I said, "Yes." He said, "Why can't I?" Isn't that extraordinary? You cannot remember what haeenppd to you earlier than the age of two or three. Which is great news for psychoanalysts, because otherwise they'd be out of a job. Because that's where all the stuff happens (lhgtaeur) that makes you who you are. Another thing you can't see is the grid on which we hang. This is fascinating. You probably know, some of you, that cells are continually renewed. Skin flakes off, hairs grow, nails, that kind of stuff — but every cell in your body is rapleecd at some point. ttsae buds, every ten days or so. Livers and internal organs take a bit longer. Spine tkaes several years. But at the end of seven yeras, not one cell in your body raenims from what was there seven years ago. The question is: who then are we? What are we? What is this thing that we hang on? That is actually us? Atoms, can't see them. Nobody ever will. They're smaller than the wavelength of light. Gas, can't see that. Interesting, somebody mentioned 1600 recently. Gas was ivnetned in 1600 by a ducth chemist celald van Helmont. It's said to be the most successful ever invention of a word by a known individual. Quite good. He also invented a word called "blas," meaning astral radiation. Didn't catch on, unfortunately. (Laughter) But well done, him. Light — you can't see light. When it's dark, in a vacuum, if a person sihens a beam of lihgt straight across your eyes, you won't see it. Slightly technical, some physicists will disagree with this. But it's odd that you can't see the beam of light, you can only see what it hits. Electricity, can't see that. Don't let anyone tell you they understand electricity, they don't. Nobody knows what it is. (Laughter) You probably think the electrons in an eteilcrc wire move instantaneously down a wire, don't you, at the speed of light, when you turn the light on, they don't. ecenlrtos bumble down the wire, about the speed of srenidapg honey, they say. gilxaaes — hundred billion of them, estimated in the universe. Hundred billion. How many can we see? Five. Five, out of a hundred billion galaxies, with the naked eye. And one of them is quite difficult to see, unless you've got very good egheyist. Radio waves. There's another thing. Heinrich Hertz, when he discovered riado wvaes, in 1887, he called them radio waves because they radiated. Somebody said to him, "What's the point of these, Heinrich? What's the point of these radio waves that you've found?" And he said, "Well, I've no idea, but I guess somebody will find a use for them someday. The biggest thing that's invisible to us is what we don't know. It is ildnriebce how little we know. Thomas Edison once said, "We don't know one percent of one millionth about anything." And I've come to the conclusion — because you ask this other question: "What's another thing we can't see?" The point, most of us. What's the point? The point — what I've got it down to is there are only two qentousis really worth asking. "Why are we here?", and "What should we do about it while we are?" To help you, I've got two things to leave you with, from two great philosophers, perhaps two of the greatest philosopher thinkers of the 20th century. One a mamhcieaiattn and engineer, and the other a poet. The first is Ludwig Wittgenstein, who said, "I don't know why we are here, but I am pertty sure it's not in order to enjoy ourselves." (Laughter) He was a cheerful bastard, wasn't he? (Laughter) And secondly, and lastly, W.H. Auden, one of my favorite poets, who said, "We are here on Earth to help others. What the others are here for, I've no idea." (Laughter) (Applause) (Circus music) [Get your souvenir potho here!] [Continue your journey into the unknown!] (Circus music)

Open Cloze

(Circus _____) [Ted N' Ed's Carnival] [John Lloyd's Inventory of the _________] [Adapted from a TEDTalk given by John Lloyd in 2009] June Cohen: Our next _______ has spent his whole ______ eliciting that _____ of wonder. Please welcome John Lloyd. (Applause) [Hall of Mirrors] The ________ is, "What is invisible?" There's more of it than you think, actually. Everything, I would say — everything that matters — Except every thing, and except matter. We can see matter but we can't see what's the matter. We can see the stars and the planets but we can't see what _____ them apart, or what draws them together. With matter as with people, we see only the skin of things, we can't see into the engine room, we can't see what makes people tick, at least not without __________, and the closer we look at anything, the more it disappears. In fact, if you look really _______ at stuff, if you look at the basic substructure of matter, there isn't anything there. Electrons disappear in a kind of fuzz, and there is only energy. One of the interesting things about invisibility is, the things that we can's see, we also can't __________. _______ is one thing that we can't see, and which we don't understand. It's the least understood of all the four fundamental forces, and the _______, and nobody really knows what it is or why it's there. For what it's worth, Sir Isaac Newton, the greatest scientist who ever lived, he thought Jesus came to Earth specifically to operate the levers of gravity. That's what he _______ he was there for. So, ______ guy, could be wrong on that one, I don't know. (Laughter) _____________. I see all your faces; I've no idea what any of you are thinking. Isn't that amazing? Isn't it incredible that we can't read each other's _____, when we can _____ each other, taste each other, perhaps, if we get close enough, but we can't read each other's minds. I find that quite astonishing. In the Sufi faith, this great Middle Eastern religion which some claim is the root of all religions, Sufi masters are all telepaths, so they say, but their main exercise of _________ is to send out powerful signals to the rest of us that it doesn't _____. So that's why we don't think it exists; the Sufi masters working on us. In the question of consciousness and artificial intelligence, artificial intelligence has really, like the study of consciousness, gotten nowhere, we have no idea how consciousness works. Not only have they not created artificial intelligence, they haven't yet created __________ stupidity. (Laughter) The laws of physics: invisible, eternal, omnipresent, all powerful. Remind you of anyone? Interesting. I'm, as you can _____, not a materialist, I'm an immaterialist. And I've found a very useful new word — ________. Okay? I'm an ignostic. [God?] I ______ to be drawn on the question on whether God ______ until somebody properly defines the terms. Another thing we can't see is the human genome. And this is increasingly peculiar, because about 20 years ago when they _______ delving into the genome, they thought it would probably contain around 100 ________ _____. Every year since, it's been revised downwards. We now think there are likely to be just over 20 thousand genes in the human ______. This is extraordinary, because rice — get this — rice is known to have 38 thousand genes. ________ have 48 chromosomes, two more than people, and the same as a gorilla. (Laughter) You can't see these things, but they are very strange. The stars by day, I always think that's fascinating. The universe disappears. The more light there is, the less you can see. Time. Nobody can see time. I don't know if you know this. There's a big movement in modern physics to decide that time doesn't really exist, because it's too inconvenient for the figures. It's much easier if it's not really there. You can't see the future, obviously, and you can't see the past, except in your memory. One of the interesting things about the past is you particularly can't see — my son asked me this the other day, "Dad, can you remember what I was like when I was two? And I said, "Yes." He said, "Why can't I?" Isn't that extraordinary? You cannot remember what ________ to you earlier than the age of two or three. Which is great news for psychoanalysts, because otherwise they'd be out of a job. Because that's where all the stuff happens (________) that makes you who you are. Another thing you can't see is the grid on which we hang. This is fascinating. You probably know, some of you, that cells are continually renewed. Skin flakes off, hairs grow, nails, that kind of stuff — but every cell in your body is ________ at some point. _____ buds, every ten days or so. Livers and internal organs take a bit longer. Spine _____ several years. But at the end of seven _____, not one cell in your body _______ from what was there seven years ago. The question is: who then are we? What are we? What is this thing that we hang on? That is actually us? Atoms, can't see them. Nobody ever will. They're smaller than the wavelength of light. Gas, can't see that. Interesting, somebody mentioned 1600 recently. Gas was ________ in 1600 by a _____ chemist ______ van Helmont. It's said to be the most successful ever invention of a word by a known individual. Quite good. He also invented a word called "blas," meaning astral radiation. Didn't catch on, unfortunately. (Laughter) But well done, him. Light — you can't see light. When it's dark, in a vacuum, if a person ______ a beam of _____ straight across your eyes, you won't see it. Slightly technical, some physicists will disagree with this. But it's odd that you can't see the beam of light, you can only see what it hits. Electricity, can't see that. Don't let anyone tell you they understand electricity, they don't. Nobody knows what it is. (Laughter) You probably think the electrons in an ________ wire move instantaneously down a wire, don't you, at the speed of light, when you turn the light on, they don't. _________ bumble down the wire, about the speed of _________ honey, they say. ________ — hundred billion of them, estimated in the universe. Hundred billion. How many can we see? Five. Five, out of a hundred billion galaxies, with the naked eye. And one of them is quite difficult to see, unless you've got very good ________. Radio waves. There's another thing. Heinrich Hertz, when he discovered _____ _____, in 1887, he called them radio waves because they radiated. Somebody said to him, "What's the point of these, Heinrich? What's the point of these radio waves that you've found?" And he said, "Well, I've no idea, but I guess somebody will find a use for them someday. The biggest thing that's invisible to us is what we don't know. It is __________ how little we know. Thomas Edison once said, "We don't know one percent of one millionth about anything." And I've come to the conclusion — because you ask this other question: "What's another thing we can't see?" The point, most of us. What's the point? The point — what I've got it down to is there are only two _________ really worth asking. "Why are we here?", and "What should we do about it while we are?" To help you, I've got two things to leave you with, from two great philosophers, perhaps two of the greatest philosopher thinkers of the 20th century. One a _____________ and engineer, and the other a poet. The first is Ludwig Wittgenstein, who said, "I don't know why we are here, but I am ______ sure it's not in order to enjoy ourselves." (Laughter) He was a cheerful bastard, wasn't he? (Laughter) And secondly, and lastly, W.H. Auden, one of my favorite poets, who said, "We are here on Earth to help others. What the others are here for, I've no idea." (Laughter) (Applause) (Circus music) [Get your souvenir _____ here!] [Continue your journey into the unknown!] (Circus music)

Solution

  1. telepathy
  2. bright
  3. incredible
  4. spreading
  5. guess
  6. career
  7. closely
  8. taste
  9. galaxies
  10. started
  11. difficulty
  12. light
  13. happened
  14. thought
  15. invisible
  16. years
  17. radio
  18. genome
  19. eyesight
  20. exists
  21. consciousness
  22. waves
  23. sense
  24. ignostic
  25. electric
  26. dutch
  27. gravity
  28. thousand
  29. touch
  30. potatoes
  31. music
  32. shines
  33. question
  34. remains
  35. photo
  36. understand
  37. holds
  38. questions
  39. genes
  40. weakest
  41. electrons
  42. exist
  43. artificial
  44. laughter
  45. refuse
  46. pretty
  47. speaker
  48. called
  49. minds
  50. takes
  51. invented
  52. mathematician
  53. replaced

Original Text

(Circus music) [Ted N' Ed's Carnival] [John Lloyd's Inventory of the Invisible] [Adapted from a TEDTalk given by John Lloyd in 2009] June Cohen: Our next speaker has spent his whole career eliciting that sense of wonder. Please welcome John Lloyd. (Applause) [Hall of Mirrors] The question is, "What is invisible?" There's more of it than you think, actually. Everything, I would say — everything that matters — Except every thing, and except matter. We can see matter but we can't see what's the matter. We can see the stars and the planets but we can't see what holds them apart, or what draws them together. With matter as with people, we see only the skin of things, we can't see into the engine room, we can't see what makes people tick, at least not without difficulty, and the closer we look at anything, the more it disappears. In fact, if you look really closely at stuff, if you look at the basic substructure of matter, there isn't anything there. Electrons disappear in a kind of fuzz, and there is only energy. One of the interesting things about invisibility is, the things that we can's see, we also can't understand. Gravity is one thing that we can't see, and which we don't understand. It's the least understood of all the four fundamental forces, and the weakest, and nobody really knows what it is or why it's there. For what it's worth, Sir Isaac Newton, the greatest scientist who ever lived, he thought Jesus came to Earth specifically to operate the levers of gravity. That's what he thought he was there for. So, bright guy, could be wrong on that one, I don't know. (Laughter) Consciousness. I see all your faces; I've no idea what any of you are thinking. Isn't that amazing? Isn't it incredible that we can't read each other's minds, when we can touch each other, taste each other, perhaps, if we get close enough, but we can't read each other's minds. I find that quite astonishing. In the Sufi faith, this great Middle Eastern religion which some claim is the root of all religions, Sufi masters are all telepaths, so they say, but their main exercise of telepathy is to send out powerful signals to the rest of us that it doesn't exist. So that's why we don't think it exists; the Sufi masters working on us. In the question of consciousness and artificial intelligence, artificial intelligence has really, like the study of consciousness, gotten nowhere, we have no idea how consciousness works. Not only have they not created artificial intelligence, they haven't yet created artificial stupidity. (Laughter) The laws of physics: invisible, eternal, omnipresent, all powerful. Remind you of anyone? Interesting. I'm, as you can guess, not a materialist, I'm an immaterialist. And I've found a very useful new word — ignostic. Okay? I'm an ignostic. [God?] I refuse to be drawn on the question on whether God exists until somebody properly defines the terms. Another thing we can't see is the human genome. And this is increasingly peculiar, because about 20 years ago when they started delving into the genome, they thought it would probably contain around 100 thousand genes. Every year since, it's been revised downwards. We now think there are likely to be just over 20 thousand genes in the human genome. This is extraordinary, because rice — get this — rice is known to have 38 thousand genes. Potatoes have 48 chromosomes, two more than people, and the same as a gorilla. (Laughter) You can't see these things, but they are very strange. The stars by day, I always think that's fascinating. The universe disappears. The more light there is, the less you can see. Time. Nobody can see time. I don't know if you know this. There's a big movement in modern physics to decide that time doesn't really exist, because it's too inconvenient for the figures. It's much easier if it's not really there. You can't see the future, obviously, and you can't see the past, except in your memory. One of the interesting things about the past is you particularly can't see — my son asked me this the other day, "Dad, can you remember what I was like when I was two? And I said, "Yes." He said, "Why can't I?" Isn't that extraordinary? You cannot remember what happened to you earlier than the age of two or three. Which is great news for psychoanalysts, because otherwise they'd be out of a job. Because that's where all the stuff happens (Laughter) that makes you who you are. Another thing you can't see is the grid on which we hang. This is fascinating. You probably know, some of you, that cells are continually renewed. Skin flakes off, hairs grow, nails, that kind of stuff — but every cell in your body is replaced at some point. Taste buds, every ten days or so. Livers and internal organs take a bit longer. Spine takes several years. But at the end of seven years, not one cell in your body remains from what was there seven years ago. The question is: who then are we? What are we? What is this thing that we hang on? That is actually us? Atoms, can't see them. Nobody ever will. They're smaller than the wavelength of light. Gas, can't see that. Interesting, somebody mentioned 1600 recently. Gas was invented in 1600 by a Dutch chemist called van Helmont. It's said to be the most successful ever invention of a word by a known individual. Quite good. He also invented a word called "blas," meaning astral radiation. Didn't catch on, unfortunately. (Laughter) But well done, him. Light — you can't see light. When it's dark, in a vacuum, if a person shines a beam of light straight across your eyes, you won't see it. Slightly technical, some physicists will disagree with this. But it's odd that you can't see the beam of light, you can only see what it hits. Electricity, can't see that. Don't let anyone tell you they understand electricity, they don't. Nobody knows what it is. (Laughter) You probably think the electrons in an electric wire move instantaneously down a wire, don't you, at the speed of light, when you turn the light on, they don't. Electrons bumble down the wire, about the speed of spreading honey, they say. Galaxies — hundred billion of them, estimated in the universe. Hundred billion. How many can we see? Five. Five, out of a hundred billion galaxies, with the naked eye. And one of them is quite difficult to see, unless you've got very good eyesight. Radio waves. There's another thing. Heinrich Hertz, when he discovered radio waves, in 1887, he called them radio waves because they radiated. Somebody said to him, "What's the point of these, Heinrich? What's the point of these radio waves that you've found?" And he said, "Well, I've no idea, but I guess somebody will find a use for them someday. The biggest thing that's invisible to us is what we don't know. It is incredible how little we know. Thomas Edison once said, "We don't know one percent of one millionth about anything." And I've come to the conclusion — because you ask this other question: "What's another thing we can't see?" The point, most of us. What's the point? The point — what I've got it down to is there are only two questions really worth asking. "Why are we here?", and "What should we do about it while we are?" To help you, I've got two things to leave you with, from two great philosophers, perhaps two of the greatest philosopher thinkers of the 20th century. One a mathematician and engineer, and the other a poet. The first is Ludwig Wittgenstein, who said, "I don't know why we are here, but I am pretty sure it's not in order to enjoy ourselves." (Laughter) He was a cheerful bastard, wasn't he? (Laughter) And secondly, and lastly, W.H. Auden, one of my favorite poets, who said, "We are here on Earth to help others. What the others are here for, I've no idea." (Laughter) (Applause) (Circus music) [Get your souvenir photo here!] [Continue your journey into the unknown!] (Circus music)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
thousand genes 3
radio waves 3
john lloyd 2
sufi masters 2
created artificial 2
human genome 2

Important Words

  1. adapted
  2. age
  3. amazing
  4. applause
  5. artificial
  6. asked
  7. astonishing
  8. astral
  9. atoms
  10. auden
  11. basic
  12. bastard
  13. beam
  14. big
  15. biggest
  16. billion
  17. bit
  18. body
  19. bright
  20. buds
  21. bumble
  22. called
  23. career
  24. carnival
  25. catch
  26. cell
  27. cells
  28. century
  29. cheerful
  30. chemist
  31. chromosomes
  32. circus
  33. claim
  34. close
  35. closely
  36. closer
  37. conclusion
  38. consciousness
  39. continually
  40. continue
  41. created
  42. dark
  43. day
  44. days
  45. decide
  46. defines
  47. delving
  48. difficult
  49. difficulty
  50. disagree
  51. disappear
  52. disappears
  53. discovered
  54. drawn
  55. draws
  56. dutch
  57. earlier
  58. earth
  59. easier
  60. eastern
  61. edison
  62. electric
  63. electricity
  64. electrons
  65. eliciting
  66. energy
  67. engine
  68. engineer
  69. enjoy
  70. estimated
  71. eternal
  72. exercise
  73. exist
  74. exists
  75. extraordinary
  76. eye
  77. eyes
  78. eyesight
  79. fact
  80. faith
  81. fascinating
  82. favorite
  83. figures
  84. find
  85. flakes
  86. forces
  87. fundamental
  88. future
  89. fuzz
  90. galaxies
  91. gas
  92. genes
  93. genome
  94. god
  95. good
  96. gorilla
  97. gravity
  98. great
  99. greatest
  100. grid
  101. grow
  102. guess
  103. guy
  104. hairs
  105. hall
  106. hang
  107. happened
  108. heinrich
  109. helmont
  110. hertz
  111. hits
  112. holds
  113. honey
  114. human
  115. idea
  116. ignostic
  117. immaterialist
  118. inconvenient
  119. increasingly
  120. incredible
  121. individual
  122. instantaneously
  123. intelligence
  124. interesting
  125. internal
  126. invented
  127. invention
  128. inventory
  129. invisibility
  130. invisible
  131. isaac
  132. jesus
  133. job
  134. john
  135. journey
  136. june
  137. kind
  138. lastly
  139. laughter
  140. laws
  141. leave
  142. levers
  143. light
  144. lived
  145. livers
  146. lloyd
  147. longer
  148. ludwig
  149. main
  150. masters
  151. materialist
  152. mathematician
  153. matter
  154. matters
  155. meaning
  156. memory
  157. mentioned
  158. middle
  159. millionth
  160. minds
  161. mirrors
  162. modern
  163. move
  164. movement
  165. music
  166. nails
  167. naked
  168. news
  169. newton
  170. odd
  171. omnipresent
  172. operate
  173. order
  174. organs
  175. peculiar
  176. people
  177. percent
  178. person
  179. philosopher
  180. philosophers
  181. photo
  182. physicists
  183. physics
  184. planets
  185. poet
  186. poets
  187. point
  188. potatoes
  189. powerful
  190. pretty
  191. properly
  192. psychoanalysts
  193. question
  194. questions
  195. radiated
  196. radiation
  197. radio
  198. read
  199. refuse
  200. religion
  201. religions
  202. remains
  203. remember
  204. remind
  205. renewed
  206. replaced
  207. rest
  208. revised
  209. rice
  210. room
  211. root
  212. scientist
  213. send
  214. sense
  215. shines
  216. signals
  217. sir
  218. skin
  219. slightly
  220. smaller
  221. son
  222. souvenir
  223. speaker
  224. specifically
  225. speed
  226. spent
  227. spine
  228. spreading
  229. stars
  230. started
  231. straight
  232. strange
  233. study
  234. stuff
  235. stupidity
  236. substructure
  237. successful
  238. sufi
  239. takes
  240. taste
  241. technical
  242. ted
  243. tedtalk
  244. telepaths
  245. telepathy
  246. ten
  247. terms
  248. thinkers
  249. thinking
  250. thomas
  251. thought
  252. thousand
  253. tick
  254. time
  255. touch
  256. turn
  257. understand
  258. understood
  259. universe
  260. vacuum
  261. van
  262. wavelength
  263. waves
  264. weakest
  265. wire
  266. wittgenstein
  267. word
  268. working
  269. works
  270. worth
  271. wrong
  272. year
  273. years