full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Nick Hanauer: Beware, fellow plutocrats, the pitchforks are coming

Unscramble the Blue Letters

We plutocrats need to get this trickle-down economics thing behind us, this idea that the better we do, the better everyone else will do. It's not true. How could it be? I earn 1,000 times the maiden wage, but I do not buy 1,000 times as much stuff, do I? I actually bhuogt two pairs of these pants, what my partner Mike calls my manager pants. I could have bought 2,000 pairs, but what would I do with them? (Laughter) How many haciruts can I get? How often can I go out to dinner? No matter how wealthy a few plutocrats get, we can never drive a great national economy. Only a thriving middle class can do that. There's nothing to be done, my pratoclut friends might say. Henry Ford was in a different time. Maybe we can't do some things. Maybe we can do some things. June 19, 2013, Bloomberg published an article I wrote caleld "The Capitalist’s Case for a $15 Minimum Wage." The good ppolee at fobres magazine, among my biggest admirers, called it "Nick Hanauer's near-insane proposal." And yet, just 350 days after that atlrice was published, Seattle's Mayor Ed Murray signed into law an ordinance raising the minimum wage in sattlee to 15 dollars an hour, more than dluobe what the piniaervlg federal $7.25 rate is. How did this happen, ranabeosle people might ask. It henppead because a group of us reminded the middle class that they are the source of growth and prosperity in capitalist eeooncims. We reminded them that when workers have more money, businesses have more customers, and need more employees. We reminded them that when businesses pay workers a lniivg wage, taxpayers are relieved of the burden of funding the pevroty prgrmoas like food stamps and medical assistance and rent assistance that those workers need. We reminded them that low-wage workers make tirlebre taxpayers, and that when you raise the minimum wage for all businesses, all businesses benefit yet all can compete.

Open Cloze

We plutocrats need to get this trickle-down economics thing behind us, this idea that the better we do, the better everyone else will do. It's not true. How could it be? I earn 1,000 times the ______ wage, but I do not buy 1,000 times as much stuff, do I? I actually ______ two pairs of these pants, what my partner Mike calls my manager pants. I could have bought 2,000 pairs, but what would I do with them? (Laughter) How many ________ can I get? How often can I go out to dinner? No matter how wealthy a few plutocrats get, we can never drive a great national economy. Only a thriving middle class can do that. There's nothing to be done, my _________ friends might say. Henry Ford was in a different time. Maybe we can't do some things. Maybe we can do some things. June 19, 2013, Bloomberg published an article I wrote ______ "The Capitalist’s Case for a $15 Minimum Wage." The good ______ at ______ magazine, among my biggest admirers, called it "Nick Hanauer's near-insane proposal." And yet, just 350 days after that _______ was published, Seattle's Mayor Ed Murray signed into law an ordinance raising the minimum wage in _______ to 15 dollars an hour, more than ______ what the __________ federal $7.25 rate is. How did this happen, __________ people might ask. It ________ because a group of us reminded the middle class that they are the source of growth and prosperity in capitalist _________. We reminded them that when workers have more money, businesses have more customers, and need more employees. We reminded them that when businesses pay workers a ______ wage, taxpayers are relieved of the burden of funding the _______ ________ like food stamps and medical assistance and rent assistance that those workers need. We reminded them that low-wage workers make ________ taxpayers, and that when you raise the minimum wage for all businesses, all businesses benefit yet all can compete.

Solution

  1. people
  2. happened
  3. plutocrat
  4. called
  5. reasonable
  6. seattle
  7. economies
  8. programs
  9. prevailing
  10. haircuts
  11. double
  12. living
  13. median
  14. poverty
  15. terrible
  16. bought
  17. forbes
  18. article

Original Text

We plutocrats need to get this trickle-down economics thing behind us, this idea that the better we do, the better everyone else will do. It's not true. How could it be? I earn 1,000 times the median wage, but I do not buy 1,000 times as much stuff, do I? I actually bought two pairs of these pants, what my partner Mike calls my manager pants. I could have bought 2,000 pairs, but what would I do with them? (Laughter) How many haircuts can I get? How often can I go out to dinner? No matter how wealthy a few plutocrats get, we can never drive a great national economy. Only a thriving middle class can do that. There's nothing to be done, my plutocrat friends might say. Henry Ford was in a different time. Maybe we can't do some things. Maybe we can do some things. June 19, 2013, Bloomberg published an article I wrote called "The Capitalist’s Case for a $15 Minimum Wage." The good people at Forbes magazine, among my biggest admirers, called it "Nick Hanauer's near-insane proposal." And yet, just 350 days after that article was published, Seattle's Mayor Ed Murray signed into law an ordinance raising the minimum wage in Seattle to 15 dollars an hour, more than double what the prevailing federal $7.25 rate is. How did this happen, reasonable people might ask. It happened because a group of us reminded the middle class that they are the source of growth and prosperity in capitalist economies. We reminded them that when workers have more money, businesses have more customers, and need more employees. We reminded them that when businesses pay workers a living wage, taxpayers are relieved of the burden of funding the poverty programs like food stamps and medical assistance and rent assistance that those workers need. We reminded them that low-wage workers make terrible taxpayers, and that when you raise the minimum wage for all businesses, all businesses benefit yet all can compete.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
middle class 7
minimum wage 7
economic inequality 3
thriving middle 3
washington state 3
fellow citizens 2
americans shared 2
capitalist democracy 2
rising economic 2
rich guys 2
henry ford 2
human problems 2
problem solvers 2
plutocrat friends 2
median wage 2
restaurant business 2
dirt road 2
road selling 2
selling fruit 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
thriving middle class 3
rising economic inequality 2
dirt road selling 2
road selling fruit 2

ngrams of length 4

collocation frequency
dirt road selling fruit 2

Important Words

  1. admirers
  2. article
  3. assistance
  4. benefit
  5. biggest
  6. bloomberg
  7. bought
  8. burden
  9. businesses
  10. buy
  11. called
  12. calls
  13. capitalist
  14. case
  15. class
  16. compete
  17. customers
  18. days
  19. dinner
  20. dollars
  21. double
  22. drive
  23. earn
  24. economics
  25. economies
  26. economy
  27. ed
  28. employees
  29. federal
  30. food
  31. forbes
  32. ford
  33. friends
  34. funding
  35. good
  36. great
  37. group
  38. growth
  39. haircuts
  40. happen
  41. happened
  42. henry
  43. hour
  44. idea
  45. june
  46. laughter
  47. law
  48. living
  49. magazine
  50. manager
  51. matter
  52. mayor
  53. median
  54. medical
  55. middle
  56. mike
  57. minimum
  58. money
  59. murray
  60. national
  61. ordinance
  62. pairs
  63. pants
  64. partner
  65. pay
  66. people
  67. plutocrat
  68. plutocrats
  69. poverty
  70. prevailing
  71. programs
  72. proposal
  73. prosperity
  74. published
  75. raise
  76. raising
  77. rate
  78. reasonable
  79. relieved
  80. reminded
  81. rent
  82. seattle
  83. signed
  84. source
  85. stamps
  86. stuff
  87. taxpayers
  88. terrible
  89. thriving
  90. time
  91. times
  92. true
  93. wage
  94. wealthy
  95. workers
  96. wrote