full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Anne-Marie Slaughter: Can we all "have it all"?

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Now most of you, when you hear me talk about breadwinning and caregiving, itlvsneiticny translate those cogeterias into men's work and women's work. And we don't typically challenge why men's work is advantaged. But consider a same-sex couple like my fednirs sraah and Emily. They're psychiatrists. They got married five years ago, and now they have two-year-old tnwis. They love being mothers, but they also love their work, and they're really good at what they do. So how are they going to divide up breadwinning and caregiving responsibilities? Should one of them stop working or reduce hours to be home? Or should they both change their practices so they can have much more flexible sedeluhcs? And what criteria should they use to make that decision? Is it who makes the most money or who is most committed to her caeerr? Or who has the most flexible boss?

Open Cloze

Now most of you, when you hear me talk about breadwinning and caregiving, _____________ translate those __________ into men's work and women's work. And we don't typically challenge why men's work is advantaged. But consider a same-sex couple like my _______ _____ and Emily. They're psychiatrists. They got married five years ago, and now they have two-year-old _____. They love being mothers, but they also love their work, and they're really good at what they do. So how are they going to divide up breadwinning and caregiving responsibilities? Should one of them stop working or reduce hours to be home? Or should they both change their practices so they can have much more flexible _________? And what criteria should they use to make that decision? Is it who makes the most money or who is most committed to her ______? Or who has the most flexible boss?

Solution

  1. friends
  2. categories
  3. schedules
  4. instinctively
  5. career
  6. sarah
  7. twins

Original Text

Now most of you, when you hear me talk about breadwinning and caregiving, instinctively translate those categories into men's work and women's work. And we don't typically challenge why men's work is advantaged. But consider a same-sex couple like my friends Sarah and Emily. They're psychiatrists. They got married five years ago, and now they have two-year-old twins. They love being mothers, but they also love their work, and they're really good at what they do. So how are they going to divide up breadwinning and caregiving responsibilities? Should one of them stop working or reduce hours to be home? Or should they both change their practices so they can have much more flexible schedules? And what criteria should they use to make that decision? Is it who makes the most money or who is most committed to her career? Or who has the most flexible boss?

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
wider range 2
real equality 2
equality means 2
feminist revolution 2
work force 2
human nature 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
real equality means 2

Important Words

  1. advantaged
  2. boss
  3. breadwinning
  4. career
  5. caregiving
  6. categories
  7. challenge
  8. change
  9. committed
  10. couple
  11. criteria
  12. decision
  13. divide
  14. emily
  15. flexible
  16. friends
  17. good
  18. hear
  19. home
  20. hours
  21. instinctively
  22. love
  23. married
  24. money
  25. mothers
  26. practices
  27. psychiatrists
  28. reduce
  29. responsibilities
  30. sarah
  31. schedules
  32. stop
  33. talk
  34. translate
  35. twins
  36. typically
  37. work
  38. working
  39. years