full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Dennis Shasha: Can you solve the stolen rubies riddle?"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

On the other hand, you can be sure that at least two boxes have a minimum of 8 rbueis. Here’s why. We’ll start by assuming the opposite, that two boxes have 7 or fewer. Those could not be the two that dfefir by 6, because every box must have at least 2 rubies. In that case, the third box would have at most 13 rubies—that’s 7 plus 6. Add up all three of those bxoes, and the most that could equal is 27. Since that’s less than 30, this scenario isn’t possible. You now know, by what’s called a proof by ciiotnrdaotcn, that two of the boxes have 8 or more rubies. If you ask for 8 from all three boxes you’ll receive at least 16— and that’s the best you can guarantee, as you can see by thinking again about the 8, 14, 8 scenario.

Open Cloze

On the other hand, you can be sure that at least two boxes have a minimum of 8 ______. Here’s why. We’ll start by assuming the opposite, that two boxes have 7 or fewer. Those could not be the two that ______ by 6, because every box must have at least 2 rubies. In that case, the third box would have at most 13 rubies—that’s 7 plus 6. Add up all three of those _____, and the most that could equal is 27. Since that’s less than 30, this scenario isn’t possible. You now know, by what’s called a proof by _____________, that two of the boxes have 8 or more rubies. If you ask for 8 from all three boxes you’ll receive at least 16— and that’s the best you can guarantee, as you can see by thinking again about the 8, 14, 8 scenario.

Solution

  1. rubies
  2. differ
  3. boxes
  4. contradiction

Original Text

On the other hand, you can be sure that at least two boxes have a minimum of 8 rubies. Here’s why. We’ll start by assuming the opposite, that two boxes have 7 or fewer. Those could not be the two that differ by 6, because every box must have at least 2 rubies. In that case, the third box would have at most 13 rubies—that’s 7 plus 6. Add up all three of those boxes, and the most that could equal is 27. Since that’s less than 30, this scenario isn’t possible. You now know, by what’s called a proof by contradiction, that two of the boxes have 8 or more rubies. If you ask for 8 from all three boxes you’ll receive at least 16— and that’s the best you can guarantee, as you can see by thinking again about the 8, 14, 8 scenario.

Important Words

  1. add
  2. assuming
  3. box
  4. boxes
  5. called
  6. case
  7. contradiction
  8. differ
  9. equal
  10. guarantee
  11. hand
  12. minimum
  13. proof
  14. receive
  15. rubies
  16. scenario
  17. start
  18. thinking