full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Gavin Pretor-Pinney: Cloudy with a chance of joy

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Clouds. Have you ever noticed how much people moan about them? They get a bad rap. If you think about it, the English lagungae has written into it negative associations towards the clouds. Someone who's down or depressed, they're under a cloud. And when there's bad news in srtoe, there's a cloud on the horizon. I saw an article the other day. It was about problems with computer posencsrig over the Internet. "A cloud over the cloud," was the headline. It seems like they're everyone's default doom-and-gloom metaphor. But I think they're beautiful, don't you? It's just that their buaety is missed because they're so omnipresent, so, I don't know, commonplace, that people don't notice them. They don't notice the beauty, but they don't even notice the clouds unless they get in the way of the sun. And so ppoele think of clouds as things that get in the way. They think of them as the annoying, frustrating obstructions, and then they rush off and do some blue-sky thinking. (Laughter) But most people, when you stop to ask them, will admit to horaibnrg a strange sort of fondness for clouds. It's like a ntoisaglc fondness, and they make them think of their yutoh. Who here can't remember thinking, well, looking and finding shapes in the clouds when they were kids? You know, when you were masters of daydreaming? arnphtsoeias, the ancient gerek playwright, he described the clouds as the patron godesses of idle fellows two and a half thousand years ago, and you can see what he means. It's just that these days, us adults seem reluctant to allow ourselves the indulgence of just allowing our imaginations to dirft along in the beerze, and I think that's a pity. I think we should perhaps do a bit more of it. I think we should be a bit more willing, perhaps, to look at the beautiful sight of the sunlight bursting out from behind the clouds and go, "Wait a minute, that's two cats dancing the salsa!" (Laughter) (Applause) Or seeing the big, wthie, puffy one up there over the shopping center looks like the Abominable Snowman going to rob a bank. (Laughter) They're like nature's version of those inkblot images, you know, that srhnkis used to show their patients in the '60s, and I think if you consider the shapes you see in the cuolds, you'll save money on psychoanalysis bills. Let's say you're in love. All right? And you look up and what do you see? Right? Or maybe the opposite. You've just been dumped by your partner, and everywhere you look, it's kissing couples. (Laughter) Perhaps you're having a memont of existential angst. You know, you're thinking about your own mtlirotay. And there, on the horizon, it's the Grim Reaper. (Laughter) Or maybe you see a topless steubnhar. (lethgaur) What would that mean? What would that mean? I have no idea. But one thing I do know is this: The bad pesrs that clouds get is taotlly unfair. I think we should stand up for them, which is why, a few years ago, I started the Cloud Appreciation Society. Tens of tonaushds of members now in almost 100 countries around the wlrod. And all these pgpohtaorhs that I'm showing, they were sent in by members. And the sotciey exists to remind people of this: Clouds are not something to moan about. Far from it. They are, in fact, the most diverse, evocative, poietc aspect of nature. I think, if you live with your head in the clouds every now and then, it helps you keep your feet on the ground. And I want to show you why, with the help of some of my favorite types of clouds. Let's start with this one. It's the cirrus cloud, named after the Latin for a lock of hair. It's composed entirely of ice crystals ccaansidg from the upper reeahcs of the trohpropese, and as these ice crystals fall, they pass through different lyares with different winds and they speed up and slow down, giving the cloud these brush-stroked appearances, these brush-stroke forms known as fall streaks. And these winds up there can be very, very fcriee. They can be 200 miles an hour, 300 miles an hour. These clouds are bombing along, but from all the way down here, they appear to be moving gracefully, slowly, like most clouds. And so to tune into the clouds is to slow down, to calm down. It's like a bit of everyday meditation. Those are common clouds. What about rarer ones, like the lenticularis, the UFO-shaped lenticularis cloud? These clouds form in the region of mountains. When the wind passes, rises to pass over the mountain, it can take on a wave-like path in the lee of the peak, with these clouds hovering at the crest of these iilibnvse standing waves of air, these flniyg saucer-like forms, and some of the elray black-and-white UFO pthoos are in fact lenticularis clouds. It's true. A little rarer are the fallstreak holes. All right? This is when a layer is made up of very, very cold water droplets, and in one region they strat to freeze, and this freezing sets off a chain reaction which spreads outwards with the ice crystals cascading and falling down below, giving the aapearnpce of jellyfish tendrils down below. Rarer still, the Kelvin–Helmholtz cloud. Not a very snappy name. Needs a rebrand. This looks like a series of bikraeng waves, and it's caused by siarnehg winds — the wind above the cloud lyaer and below the cuold layer differ significantly, and in the middle, in between, you get this undulating of the air, and if the difference in those speeds is just right, the tops of the undulations curl over in these beautiful breaking wave-like vortices. All right. Those are rarer clouds than the cirrus, but they're not that rare. If you look up, and you pay attention to the sky, you'll see them sooner or later, maybe not quite as dramatic as these, but you'll see them. And you'll see them around where you live. Clouds are the most egalitarian of nature's displays, because we all have a good, fantastic view of the sky. And these clouds, these rarer clouds, remind us that the exotic can be found in the everyday. Nothing is more niroiunshg, more siaitlutnmg to an active, inquiring mind than being surprised, being amazed. It's why we're all here at TED, right? But you don't need to rush off away from the familiar, across the world to be surprised. You just need to step outside, pay attention to what's so cmpcomanloe, so everyday, so mundane that everybody else misses it. One cloud that people rarely miss is this one: the cumulonimbus storm cloud. It's what's poecruds thunder and lightning and hail. These clouds spread out at the top in this enormous anvil fashion stretching 10 melis up into the amesrphtoe. They are an expression of the majestic ahictcrrutee of our atmosphere. But from down below, they are the embodiment of the powerful, elemental force and power that drives our atmosphere. To be there is to be connected in the driving rain and the hail, to feel connected to our atmosphere. It's to be reminded that we are creatures that inhabit this ocean of air. We don't live beneath the sky. We live within it. And that connection, that visceral connection to our atmosphere feels to me like an aotdntie. It's an antidote to the growing tendency we have to feel that we can really ever experience life by witnhacg it on a cepotumr srceen, you know, when we're in a wi-fi zone. But the one cloud that best expresses why ctdsoolptniug is more valuable today than ever is this one, the cmluuus cloud. Right? It forms on a sunny day. If you close your eyes and think of a cloud, it's probably one of these that comes to mind. All those cloud shapes at the beginning, those were cumulus clouds. The sharp, crisp outlines of this formation make it the best one for finding spaehs in. And it reminds us of the aimless nurtae of cloudspotting, what an aimless activity it is. You're not going to change the world by lying on your back and gazing up at the sky, are you? It's pointless. It's a pointless activity, which is plreeiscy why it's so important. The digital world conspires to make us feel eternally busy, ppaulteerly busy. You know, when you're not dealing with the tiritdaoanl persruess of earning a living and putting food on the table, raising a family, writing thank you letters, you have to now contend with answering a mountain of unanswered elaims, updating a Facebook page, feeding your Twitter feed. And cloudspotting legitimizes doing nothing. (Laughter) And sometimes we need — (apsalupe) Sometimes we need excuses to do nothing. We need to be rmnedied by these patron goddesses of idle fellows that slowing down and being in the present, not tnihikng about what you've got to do and what you should have done, but just being here, letitng your imagination lift from the eavdyery concerns down here and just being in the present, it's good for you, and it's good for the way you feel. It's good for your ideas. It's good for your catirteviy. It's good for your soul. So keep looking up, marvel at the ephemeral beauty, and always remember to live life with your head in the clouds. Thank you very much. (Applause)

Open Cloze

Clouds. Have you ever noticed how much people moan about them? They get a bad rap. If you think about it, the English ________ has written into it negative associations towards the clouds. Someone who's down or depressed, they're under a cloud. And when there's bad news in _____, there's a cloud on the horizon. I saw an article the other day. It was about problems with computer __________ over the Internet. "A cloud over the cloud," was the headline. It seems like they're everyone's default doom-and-gloom metaphor. But I think they're beautiful, don't you? It's just that their ______ is missed because they're so omnipresent, so, I don't know, commonplace, that people don't notice them. They don't notice the beauty, but they don't even notice the clouds unless they get in the way of the sun. And so ______ think of clouds as things that get in the way. They think of them as the annoying, frustrating obstructions, and then they rush off and do some blue-sky thinking. (Laughter) But most people, when you stop to ask them, will admit to _________ a strange sort of fondness for clouds. It's like a _________ fondness, and they make them think of their _____. Who here can't remember thinking, well, looking and finding shapes in the clouds when they were kids? You know, when you were masters of daydreaming? ____________, the ancient _____ playwright, he described the clouds as the patron godesses of idle fellows two and a half thousand years ago, and you can see what he means. It's just that these days, us adults seem reluctant to allow ourselves the indulgence of just allowing our imaginations to _____ along in the ______, and I think that's a pity. I think we should perhaps do a bit more of it. I think we should be a bit more willing, perhaps, to look at the beautiful sight of the sunlight bursting out from behind the clouds and go, "Wait a minute, that's two cats dancing the salsa!" (Laughter) (Applause) Or seeing the big, _____, puffy one up there over the shopping center looks like the Abominable Snowman going to rob a bank. (Laughter) They're like nature's version of those inkblot images, you know, that _______ used to show their patients in the '60s, and I think if you consider the shapes you see in the ______, you'll save money on psychoanalysis bills. Let's say you're in love. All right? And you look up and what do you see? Right? Or maybe the opposite. You've just been dumped by your partner, and everywhere you look, it's kissing couples. (Laughter) Perhaps you're having a ______ of existential angst. You know, you're thinking about your own _________. And there, on the horizon, it's the Grim Reaper. (Laughter) Or maybe you see a topless _________. (________) What would that mean? What would that mean? I have no idea. But one thing I do know is this: The bad _____ that clouds get is _______ unfair. I think we should stand up for them, which is why, a few years ago, I started the Cloud Appreciation Society. Tens of _________ of members now in almost 100 countries around the _____. And all these ___________ that I'm showing, they were sent in by members. And the _______ exists to remind people of this: Clouds are not something to moan about. Far from it. They are, in fact, the most diverse, evocative, ______ aspect of nature. I think, if you live with your head in the clouds every now and then, it helps you keep your feet on the ground. And I want to show you why, with the help of some of my favorite types of clouds. Let's start with this one. It's the cirrus cloud, named after the Latin for a lock of hair. It's composed entirely of ice crystals _________ from the upper _______ of the ___________, and as these ice crystals fall, they pass through different ______ with different winds and they speed up and slow down, giving the cloud these brush-stroked appearances, these brush-stroke forms known as fall streaks. And these winds up there can be very, very ______. They can be 200 miles an hour, 300 miles an hour. These clouds are bombing along, but from all the way down here, they appear to be moving gracefully, slowly, like most clouds. And so to tune into the clouds is to slow down, to calm down. It's like a bit of everyday meditation. Those are common clouds. What about rarer ones, like the lenticularis, the UFO-shaped lenticularis cloud? These clouds form in the region of mountains. When the wind passes, rises to pass over the mountain, it can take on a wave-like path in the lee of the peak, with these clouds hovering at the crest of these _________ standing waves of air, these ______ saucer-like forms, and some of the _____ black-and-white UFO ______ are in fact lenticularis clouds. It's true. A little rarer are the fallstreak holes. All right? This is when a layer is made up of very, very cold water droplets, and in one region they _____ to freeze, and this freezing sets off a chain reaction which spreads outwards with the ice crystals cascading and falling down below, giving the __________ of jellyfish tendrils down below. Rarer still, the Kelvin–Helmholtz cloud. Not a very snappy name. Needs a rebrand. This looks like a series of ________ waves, and it's caused by ________ winds — the wind above the cloud _____ and below the _____ layer differ significantly, and in the middle, in between, you get this undulating of the air, and if the difference in those speeds is just right, the tops of the undulations curl over in these beautiful breaking wave-like vortices. All right. Those are rarer clouds than the cirrus, but they're not that rare. If you look up, and you pay attention to the sky, you'll see them sooner or later, maybe not quite as dramatic as these, but you'll see them. And you'll see them around where you live. Clouds are the most egalitarian of nature's displays, because we all have a good, fantastic view of the sky. And these clouds, these rarer clouds, remind us that the exotic can be found in the everyday. Nothing is more __________, more ___________ to an active, inquiring mind than being surprised, being amazed. It's why we're all here at TED, right? But you don't need to rush off away from the familiar, across the world to be surprised. You just need to step outside, pay attention to what's so ___________, so everyday, so mundane that everybody else misses it. One cloud that people rarely miss is this one: the cumulonimbus storm cloud. It's what's ________ thunder and lightning and hail. These clouds spread out at the top in this enormous anvil fashion stretching 10 _____ up into the __________. They are an expression of the majestic ____________ of our atmosphere. But from down below, they are the embodiment of the powerful, elemental force and power that drives our atmosphere. To be there is to be connected in the driving rain and the hail, to feel connected to our atmosphere. It's to be reminded that we are creatures that inhabit this ocean of air. We don't live beneath the sky. We live within it. And that connection, that visceral connection to our atmosphere feels to me like an ________. It's an antidote to the growing tendency we have to feel that we can really ever experience life by ________ it on a ________ ______, you know, when we're in a wi-fi zone. But the one cloud that best expresses why _____________ is more valuable today than ever is this one, the _______ cloud. Right? It forms on a sunny day. If you close your eyes and think of a cloud, it's probably one of these that comes to mind. All those cloud shapes at the beginning, those were cumulus clouds. The sharp, crisp outlines of this formation make it the best one for finding ______ in. And it reminds us of the aimless ______ of cloudspotting, what an aimless activity it is. You're not going to change the world by lying on your back and gazing up at the sky, are you? It's pointless. It's a pointless activity, which is _________ why it's so important. The digital world conspires to make us feel eternally busy, ___________ busy. You know, when you're not dealing with the ___________ _________ of earning a living and putting food on the table, raising a family, writing thank you letters, you have to now contend with answering a mountain of unanswered ______, updating a Facebook page, feeding your Twitter feed. And cloudspotting legitimizes doing nothing. (Laughter) And sometimes we need — (________) Sometimes we need excuses to do nothing. We need to be ________ by these patron goddesses of idle fellows that slowing down and being in the present, not ________ about what you've got to do and what you should have done, but just being here, _______ your imagination lift from the ________ concerns down here and just being in the present, it's good for you, and it's good for the way you feel. It's good for your ideas. It's good for your __________. It's good for your soul. So keep looking up, marvel at the ephemeral beauty, and always remember to live life with your head in the clouds. Thank you very much. (Applause)

Solution

  1. atmosphere
  2. processing
  3. store
  4. totally
  5. early
  6. perpetually
  7. nature
  8. troposphere
  9. computer
  10. applause
  11. people
  12. emails
  13. thousands
  14. laughter
  15. flying
  16. watching
  17. language
  18. miles
  19. fierce
  20. thinking
  21. antidote
  22. creativity
  23. moment
  24. harboring
  25. youth
  26. cloud
  27. appearance
  28. cloudspotting
  29. architecture
  30. stimulating
  31. screen
  32. aristophanes
  33. everyday
  34. pressures
  35. nostalgic
  36. drift
  37. commonplace
  38. produces
  39. layers
  40. society
  41. precisely
  42. shapes
  43. photographs
  44. traditional
  45. press
  46. sunbather
  47. poetic
  48. greek
  49. cascading
  50. nourishing
  51. breaking
  52. clouds
  53. reminded
  54. reaches
  55. photos
  56. cumulus
  57. world
  58. letting
  59. mortality
  60. white
  61. breeze
  62. beauty
  63. layer
  64. shrinks
  65. shearing
  66. invisible
  67. start

Original Text

Clouds. Have you ever noticed how much people moan about them? They get a bad rap. If you think about it, the English language has written into it negative associations towards the clouds. Someone who's down or depressed, they're under a cloud. And when there's bad news in store, there's a cloud on the horizon. I saw an article the other day. It was about problems with computer processing over the Internet. "A cloud over the cloud," was the headline. It seems like they're everyone's default doom-and-gloom metaphor. But I think they're beautiful, don't you? It's just that their beauty is missed because they're so omnipresent, so, I don't know, commonplace, that people don't notice them. They don't notice the beauty, but they don't even notice the clouds unless they get in the way of the sun. And so people think of clouds as things that get in the way. They think of them as the annoying, frustrating obstructions, and then they rush off and do some blue-sky thinking. (Laughter) But most people, when you stop to ask them, will admit to harboring a strange sort of fondness for clouds. It's like a nostalgic fondness, and they make them think of their youth. Who here can't remember thinking, well, looking and finding shapes in the clouds when they were kids? You know, when you were masters of daydreaming? Aristophanes, the ancient Greek playwright, he described the clouds as the patron godesses of idle fellows two and a half thousand years ago, and you can see what he means. It's just that these days, us adults seem reluctant to allow ourselves the indulgence of just allowing our imaginations to drift along in the breeze, and I think that's a pity. I think we should perhaps do a bit more of it. I think we should be a bit more willing, perhaps, to look at the beautiful sight of the sunlight bursting out from behind the clouds and go, "Wait a minute, that's two cats dancing the salsa!" (Laughter) (Applause) Or seeing the big, white, puffy one up there over the shopping center looks like the Abominable Snowman going to rob a bank. (Laughter) They're like nature's version of those inkblot images, you know, that shrinks used to show their patients in the '60s, and I think if you consider the shapes you see in the clouds, you'll save money on psychoanalysis bills. Let's say you're in love. All right? And you look up and what do you see? Right? Or maybe the opposite. You've just been dumped by your partner, and everywhere you look, it's kissing couples. (Laughter) Perhaps you're having a moment of existential angst. You know, you're thinking about your own mortality. And there, on the horizon, it's the Grim Reaper. (Laughter) Or maybe you see a topless sunbather. (Laughter) What would that mean? What would that mean? I have no idea. But one thing I do know is this: The bad press that clouds get is totally unfair. I think we should stand up for them, which is why, a few years ago, I started the Cloud Appreciation Society. Tens of thousands of members now in almost 100 countries around the world. And all these photographs that I'm showing, they were sent in by members. And the society exists to remind people of this: Clouds are not something to moan about. Far from it. They are, in fact, the most diverse, evocative, poetic aspect of nature. I think, if you live with your head in the clouds every now and then, it helps you keep your feet on the ground. And I want to show you why, with the help of some of my favorite types of clouds. Let's start with this one. It's the cirrus cloud, named after the Latin for a lock of hair. It's composed entirely of ice crystals cascading from the upper reaches of the troposphere, and as these ice crystals fall, they pass through different layers with different winds and they speed up and slow down, giving the cloud these brush-stroked appearances, these brush-stroke forms known as fall streaks. And these winds up there can be very, very fierce. They can be 200 miles an hour, 300 miles an hour. These clouds are bombing along, but from all the way down here, they appear to be moving gracefully, slowly, like most clouds. And so to tune into the clouds is to slow down, to calm down. It's like a bit of everyday meditation. Those are common clouds. What about rarer ones, like the lenticularis, the UFO-shaped lenticularis cloud? These clouds form in the region of mountains. When the wind passes, rises to pass over the mountain, it can take on a wave-like path in the lee of the peak, with these clouds hovering at the crest of these invisible standing waves of air, these flying saucer-like forms, and some of the early black-and-white UFO photos are in fact lenticularis clouds. It's true. A little rarer are the fallstreak holes. All right? This is when a layer is made up of very, very cold water droplets, and in one region they start to freeze, and this freezing sets off a chain reaction which spreads outwards with the ice crystals cascading and falling down below, giving the appearance of jellyfish tendrils down below. Rarer still, the Kelvin–Helmholtz cloud. Not a very snappy name. Needs a rebrand. This looks like a series of breaking waves, and it's caused by shearing winds — the wind above the cloud layer and below the cloud layer differ significantly, and in the middle, in between, you get this undulating of the air, and if the difference in those speeds is just right, the tops of the undulations curl over in these beautiful breaking wave-like vortices. All right. Those are rarer clouds than the cirrus, but they're not that rare. If you look up, and you pay attention to the sky, you'll see them sooner or later, maybe not quite as dramatic as these, but you'll see them. And you'll see them around where you live. Clouds are the most egalitarian of nature's displays, because we all have a good, fantastic view of the sky. And these clouds, these rarer clouds, remind us that the exotic can be found in the everyday. Nothing is more nourishing, more stimulating to an active, inquiring mind than being surprised, being amazed. It's why we're all here at TED, right? But you don't need to rush off away from the familiar, across the world to be surprised. You just need to step outside, pay attention to what's so commonplace, so everyday, so mundane that everybody else misses it. One cloud that people rarely miss is this one: the cumulonimbus storm cloud. It's what's produces thunder and lightning and hail. These clouds spread out at the top in this enormous anvil fashion stretching 10 miles up into the atmosphere. They are an expression of the majestic architecture of our atmosphere. But from down below, they are the embodiment of the powerful, elemental force and power that drives our atmosphere. To be there is to be connected in the driving rain and the hail, to feel connected to our atmosphere. It's to be reminded that we are creatures that inhabit this ocean of air. We don't live beneath the sky. We live within it. And that connection, that visceral connection to our atmosphere feels to me like an antidote. It's an antidote to the growing tendency we have to feel that we can really ever experience life by watching it on a computer screen, you know, when we're in a wi-fi zone. But the one cloud that best expresses why cloudspotting is more valuable today than ever is this one, the cumulus cloud. Right? It forms on a sunny day. If you close your eyes and think of a cloud, it's probably one of these that comes to mind. All those cloud shapes at the beginning, those were cumulus clouds. The sharp, crisp outlines of this formation make it the best one for finding shapes in. And it reminds us of the aimless nature of cloudspotting, what an aimless activity it is. You're not going to change the world by lying on your back and gazing up at the sky, are you? It's pointless. It's a pointless activity, which is precisely why it's so important. The digital world conspires to make us feel eternally busy, perpetually busy. You know, when you're not dealing with the traditional pressures of earning a living and putting food on the table, raising a family, writing thank you letters, you have to now contend with answering a mountain of unanswered emails, updating a Facebook page, feeding your Twitter feed. And cloudspotting legitimizes doing nothing. (Laughter) And sometimes we need — (Applause) Sometimes we need excuses to do nothing. We need to be reminded by these patron goddesses of idle fellows that slowing down and being in the present, not thinking about what you've got to do and what you should have done, but just being here, letting your imagination lift from the everyday concerns down here and just being in the present, it's good for you, and it's good for the way you feel. It's good for your ideas. It's good for your creativity. It's good for your soul. So keep looking up, marvel at the ephemeral beauty, and always remember to live life with your head in the clouds. Thank you very much. (Applause)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
ice crystals 3
finding shapes 2
idle fellows 2
crystals cascading 2
cloud layer 2
pay attention 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
ice crystals cascading 2

Important Words

  1. abominable
  2. active
  3. activity
  4. admit
  5. adults
  6. aimless
  7. air
  8. allowing
  9. amazed
  10. ancient
  11. angst
  12. annoying
  13. answering
  14. antidote
  15. anvil
  16. appearance
  17. appearances
  18. applause
  19. appreciation
  20. architecture
  21. aristophanes
  22. article
  23. aspect
  24. associations
  25. atmosphere
  26. attention
  27. bad
  28. bank
  29. beautiful
  30. beauty
  31. beginning
  32. beneath
  33. big
  34. bills
  35. bit
  36. bombing
  37. breaking
  38. breeze
  39. bursting
  40. busy
  41. calm
  42. cascading
  43. cats
  44. caused
  45. center
  46. chain
  47. change
  48. cirrus
  49. close
  50. cloud
  51. clouds
  52. cloudspotting
  53. cold
  54. common
  55. commonplace
  56. composed
  57. computer
  58. concerns
  59. connected
  60. connection
  61. conspires
  62. contend
  63. countries
  64. couples
  65. creativity
  66. creatures
  67. crest
  68. crisp
  69. crystals
  70. cumulonimbus
  71. cumulus
  72. curl
  73. dancing
  74. day
  75. daydreaming
  76. days
  77. dealing
  78. default
  79. depressed
  80. differ
  81. difference
  82. digital
  83. displays
  84. diverse
  85. dramatic
  86. drift
  87. drives
  88. driving
  89. droplets
  90. dumped
  91. early
  92. earning
  93. egalitarian
  94. elemental
  95. emails
  96. embodiment
  97. english
  98. enormous
  99. ephemeral
  100. eternally
  101. everyday
  102. evocative
  103. excuses
  104. existential
  105. exists
  106. exotic
  107. experience
  108. expresses
  109. expression
  110. eyes
  111. facebook
  112. fact
  113. fall
  114. falling
  115. fallstreak
  116. familiar
  117. family
  118. fantastic
  119. fashion
  120. favorite
  121. feed
  122. feeding
  123. feel
  124. feels
  125. feet
  126. fellows
  127. fierce
  128. finding
  129. flying
  130. fondness
  131. food
  132. force
  133. form
  134. formation
  135. forms
  136. freeze
  137. freezing
  138. frustrating
  139. gazing
  140. giving
  141. goddesses
  142. godesses
  143. good
  144. gracefully
  145. greek
  146. grim
  147. ground
  148. growing
  149. hail
  150. hair
  151. harboring
  152. head
  153. headline
  154. helps
  155. holes
  156. horizon
  157. hour
  158. hovering
  159. ice
  160. idea
  161. ideas
  162. idle
  163. images
  164. imagination
  165. imaginations
  166. important
  167. indulgence
  168. inhabit
  169. inkblot
  170. inquiring
  171. internet
  172. invisible
  173. jellyfish
  174. kids
  175. kissing
  176. language
  177. latin
  178. laughter
  179. layer
  180. layers
  181. lee
  182. legitimizes
  183. lenticularis
  184. letters
  185. letting
  186. life
  187. lift
  188. lightning
  189. live
  190. living
  191. lock
  192. love
  193. lying
  194. majestic
  195. marvel
  196. masters
  197. means
  198. meditation
  199. members
  200. metaphor
  201. middle
  202. miles
  203. mind
  204. minute
  205. missed
  206. misses
  207. moan
  208. moment
  209. money
  210. mortality
  211. mountain
  212. mountains
  213. moving
  214. mundane
  215. named
  216. nature
  217. negative
  218. news
  219. nostalgic
  220. notice
  221. noticed
  222. nourishing
  223. obstructions
  224. ocean
  225. omnipresent
  226. outlines
  227. outwards
  228. page
  229. partner
  230. pass
  231. passes
  232. path
  233. patients
  234. patron
  235. pay
  236. peak
  237. people
  238. perpetually
  239. photographs
  240. photos
  241. pity
  242. playwright
  243. poetic
  244. pointless
  245. power
  246. powerful
  247. precisely
  248. present
  249. press
  250. pressures
  251. problems
  252. processing
  253. produces
  254. psychoanalysis
  255. puffy
  256. putting
  257. rain
  258. raising
  259. rap
  260. rare
  261. rarely
  262. rarer
  263. reaches
  264. reaction
  265. reaper
  266. rebrand
  267. region
  268. reluctant
  269. remember
  270. remind
  271. reminded
  272. reminds
  273. rises
  274. rob
  275. rush
  276. save
  277. screen
  278. series
  279. sets
  280. shapes
  281. sharp
  282. shearing
  283. shopping
  284. show
  285. showing
  286. shrinks
  287. sight
  288. significantly
  289. sky
  290. slow
  291. slowing
  292. slowly
  293. snappy
  294. snowman
  295. society
  296. sooner
  297. sort
  298. soul
  299. speed
  300. speeds
  301. spread
  302. spreads
  303. stand
  304. standing
  305. start
  306. started
  307. step
  308. stimulating
  309. stop
  310. store
  311. storm
  312. strange
  313. streaks
  314. stretching
  315. sun
  316. sunbather
  317. sunlight
  318. sunny
  319. surprised
  320. table
  321. ted
  322. tendency
  323. tendrils
  324. tens
  325. thinking
  326. thousand
  327. thousands
  328. thunder
  329. today
  330. top
  331. topless
  332. tops
  333. totally
  334. traditional
  335. troposphere
  336. true
  337. tune
  338. twitter
  339. types
  340. ufo
  341. unanswered
  342. undulating
  343. undulations
  344. unfair
  345. updating
  346. upper
  347. valuable
  348. version
  349. view
  350. visceral
  351. vortices
  352. watching
  353. water
  354. waves
  355. white
  356. wind
  357. winds
  358. world
  359. writing
  360. written
  361. years
  362. youth
  363. zone