full transcript

From the Ted Talk by John Bohannon: Dance vs. powerpoint, a modest proposal

Unscramble the Blue Letters

The most surprising thing that I've learned while running this contest is that some scientists are now working directly with dancers on their research. For example, at the University of Minnesota, there's a biomedical engineer nemad David Odde, and he wkros with dancers to study how clles move. They do it by changing their shape. When a chemical signal washes up on one side, it triggers the cell to expand its shape on that side, because the cell is constantly touching and tugging at the environment. So that allows cells to ooze along in the right directions. But what seems so slow and gcrefual from the outside is really more like chaos inside, because cells control their shape with a skeleton of rigid poreitn fibers, and those fibers are cstnatolny falling apart. But just as quickly as they explode, more pritnoes attach to the ends and grow them leongr, so it's constantly cahnnigg just to remain exactly the same. Now, David builds mathematical models of this and then he tests those in the lab, but before he does that, he works with dencars to figure out what kinds of models to bluid in the first place. It's basically efficient brainstorming, and when I vitised David to learn about his research, he used dancers to explain it to me rather than the uuasl method: PowerPoint.

Open Cloze

The most surprising thing that I've learned while running this contest is that some scientists are now working directly with dancers on their research. For example, at the University of Minnesota, there's a biomedical engineer _____ David Odde, and he _____ with dancers to study how _____ move. They do it by changing their shape. When a chemical signal washes up on one side, it triggers the cell to expand its shape on that side, because the cell is constantly touching and tugging at the environment. So that allows cells to ooze along in the right directions. But what seems so slow and ________ from the outside is really more like chaos inside, because cells control their shape with a skeleton of rigid _______ fibers, and those fibers are __________ falling apart. But just as quickly as they explode, more ________ attach to the ends and grow them ______, so it's constantly ________ just to remain exactly the same. Now, David builds mathematical models of this and then he tests those in the lab, but before he does that, he works with _______ to figure out what kinds of models to _____ in the first place. It's basically efficient brainstorming, and when I _______ David to learn about his research, he used dancers to explain it to me rather than the _____ method: PowerPoint.

Solution

  1. cells
  2. named
  3. proteins
  4. visited
  5. graceful
  6. longer
  7. dancers
  8. protein
  9. build
  10. changing
  11. works
  12. constantly
  13. usual

Original Text

The most surprising thing that I've learned while running this contest is that some scientists are now working directly with dancers on their research. For example, at the University of Minnesota, there's a biomedical engineer named David Odde, and he works with dancers to study how cells move. They do it by changing their shape. When a chemical signal washes up on one side, it triggers the cell to expand its shape on that side, because the cell is constantly touching and tugging at the environment. So that allows cells to ooze along in the right directions. But what seems so slow and graceful from the outside is really more like chaos inside, because cells control their shape with a skeleton of rigid protein fibers, and those fibers are constantly falling apart. But just as quickly as they explode, more proteins attach to the ends and grow them longer, so it's constantly changing just to remain exactly the same. Now, David builds mathematical models of this and then he tests those in the lab, but before he does that, he works with dancers to figure out what kinds of models to build in the first place. It's basically efficient brainstorming, and when I visited David to learn about his research, he used dancers to explain it to me rather than the usual method: PowerPoint.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
modest proposal 2
beautiful experiment 2
powerpoint presentations 2
eliminate public 2
public funding 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
eliminate public funding 2

Important Words

  1. attach
  2. basically
  3. biomedical
  4. brainstorming
  5. build
  6. builds
  7. cell
  8. cells
  9. changing
  10. chaos
  11. chemical
  12. constantly
  13. contest
  14. control
  15. dancers
  16. david
  17. directions
  18. efficient
  19. ends
  20. engineer
  21. environment
  22. expand
  23. explain
  24. explode
  25. falling
  26. fibers
  27. figure
  28. graceful
  29. grow
  30. kinds
  31. lab
  32. learn
  33. learned
  34. longer
  35. mathematical
  36. minnesota
  37. models
  38. move
  39. named
  40. odde
  41. ooze
  42. place
  43. powerpoint
  44. protein
  45. proteins
  46. quickly
  47. remain
  48. research
  49. rigid
  50. running
  51. scientists
  52. shape
  53. side
  54. signal
  55. skeleton
  56. slow
  57. study
  58. surprising
  59. tests
  60. touching
  61. triggers
  62. tugging
  63. university
  64. usual
  65. visited
  66. washes
  67. working
  68. works