full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by David Gallo: Deep ocean mysteries and wonders"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

You know, I had a real rough time in scoohl with ADD, and I have a PhD. I earned a PhD, but ... tough to pay attention — biology, glgooey, physics, chemistry — really tough for me. Only one thing grabbed my attention, and it's that planet called Earth. But in this picture here, you'll see that Earth is mostly water. That's the Pacific. Seventy percent of Earth is covered with water. You can say, "Hey, I know Earth. I live here." You don't know Earth. You don't know this planet, because most of it's covered with that — average depth, two miles. And when you go outside and look up at the Empire State bnliidug, Chrysler Building, the average depth of the ocean is 15 of those on top of one another. We've explored about five percent of what's in that water. "Explored," meaning, for the first time, go peek and see what's there. So what I want to do today is show you some things about this planet, about the oceans. I want to take you from shallow water down to the deep water, and hopefully, like me, you'll see some things that get you hokoed on exploring planet Earth. You know things like corals; you've seen plenty of corals, those of you who've been to the beach, skreilnong, know colars are an animzag place to go — full of life, some big animals, small animals, some nice, some dangerous, sharks, whales, all that stuff. They need to be protected from humanity. They're great places. But what you probably don't know is in the very deep part of the ocean, we have volcanic eruptions. Most vnolcaeos on Earth are at the bottom of the sea — more than 80 percent. And we actually have fire, fire deep inside the ocean, going on right now. All over the wrold — in the Pacific, the atltniac, the Indian Ocean. In this plcae, the ocean folor, the rocks actually turn to liquid. So you actually have waves on the ocean floor. You'd say nothing could live there, but when we look in detail, even there, in the deepest, dresakt places on Earth, we find life, which tells us that life really wants to hepapn. So, pretty amazing stuff. Every time we go to the bottom of the sea, we explore with our submarines, with our robots, we see something that's usually surprising, sometimes it's startling and sometimes revolutionary. You see that puddle of water sitting there. And all around the water there's a little cflif, there's a little white sadny beach. We'll get closer, you'll see the becah a little bit better, some of the waves in that water, down there. The thing that's sacpeil about this water is that it's at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. So you're sitting inside a sbmaiurne, looking out the window at a little pond of water beneath the sea. We see ponds, we see lakes, we see rivers — in fact, right here is a rievr at the bottom of the ocean going from the lower left to the upper right. Water is actually flowing through there. This totally blew our minds. How can you have this at the bottom? You're in the ocean looking at more water. And there's animals that only live in that water. So, the bottom of the ocean — I love this map, because it sohws in the mdilde of the ocean, there's a mountain range. It's the greatest mnituaon rnage on ertah, called the mid-ocean rigde — 50,000 meils long, and we've hardly had a peek at it. Hardly had a peek at it. We find valleys, many thousands of valleys, larger, wider, deeper than the Grand Canyon. We find, as I said, underwater lakes, rrveis, waterfalls. The largest waterfall on the planet is actually under the ocean, up near Iceland. All that stuff is in that five percent that we've explored. So the deal about the ocean is that to explore it, you've got to have technology. Not only technology, but it's not just Dave gllao or one person exploring, it's a team of people. You've got to have the talent, the team. You've got to have the technology. In this case, it's our ship, Atlantis, and the submarine, Alvin. Inside that submarine — this is an Alvin launch — there's three people. They're being wheeled out onto deck. There's 47 other people, the teamwork on that ship, making sure that these people are okay. Everybody in that submarine is tnnkiihg one thing right now: Should I have gone to the bathroom one more time? Because you're in there for 10 hours — 10 hrous in that little sphere. Three of you together and nobody is going to be around you. You go into the water and once you hit the water, it's amazing. There's a lovely color blue that penetrates right inside you. You don't hear the surface ship anymore, you hear that pinging of a sonar. If you've got an iPhone you've got sonar on there — it's that same pinging that goes down to the bottom and comes back up. dervis cechk out the sub to make sure the outside is okay, and then they say "Go," and down you go to the bottom of the ocean and it's an amazing trip. So for two and a half hours, you sink down to the boottm. And two hours of it is totally pitch black. We thought that nothing could live inside that world at the bottom of the ocean. And when we look, we find some amazing things. All the way down — we call it the mid-water — from the top of the ocean down to the bottom, we find life. Whenever we stop and look, we find life. I'm going to show you some jellies. They're absolutely some of the ceolsot creatures on Earth. Look at that thing, just flianlig his arms around. That's like a little lobster. That one is like all these anamils with their mtouhs hooked together, the colonial animals. Some animals are tiny, some can be longer than this sagte. Just amazing animals. And you can't collect them with a net — we have to go with our cameras and take a look at them. So every time we go, new species of life. The oecan is full of life. And yet the deepest part of the ocean — when we go to that mountain range, we find hot springs. Now we were sure — because this is poisonous wetar, because it's so deep it would crush the Titanic the same way you crush an epmty cup in your hand — we were sure there would be no life there at all. Instead, we find more life and diversity and diestny than in the tropical rainforest. So, in one instance, in one peek out the window of the sub, we discover something that revolutionizes the way we think about life on Earth; and that is, you don't always have to have sunlight to get life going. There's big animals down there too, some that look familiar. That guy's called dbumo. I love him. Dumbo's great. This guy — oh man, I wish I had more footage of this. We're trying to get an expedition together to go look at this and maybe in a year we'll have that. Go online and look. Vampyroteuthis infernalis. The vmpraie squid. Incredibly cool. In the darkness of the deep sea, he's got glowing tentacles, so if I'm coming at you like him, I put my arms out in the darnekss so all you see are little glowing things over here. Meanwhile, I'm coming at you. When he wants to ecspae, he's got these glowing pods on his butt that look like eyes. Glowing eyes on his butt. How cool is that? Just an amazing animal. (lghtuaer) "Vampire" sqiud, because when it gets protective, it pluls this black cape over its whole body, and curls up into a ball. Outrageous animal. This ship, "The Ship of Dreams" — a hundred years ago this conmig aripl, this ship was seusoppd to show up in New York. It's the Titanic. I co-led an eetpxidoin out there last year. We are learning so much about that ship. The tniitac is an interesting place for bloiogy, because animals are moving in to live on the Titanic. Microbes are actually eating the hull of the Titanic. That's where Jack was king of the world there on the bow of the Titanic. So we're doing real good. And what's exciting to me is that we're mnakig a virtual Titanic, so you can sit there at home with your jictosyk and your headset on, and you can actually explore the Titanic for yourself. That's what we want to do, make these virtual worlds, so it's not Dave Gallo or someone else exploring the world; it's you. You erolpxe it for yourself. So here's the bottom line: The oceans are unexplored and I can't begin to tell you how important that is, because they're imnptroat to us. Seven boililn people live on this planet and all of us are impacted by the sea, because the oceans cnrootl the air you breathe, the water you drink, the food you eat. All those are controlled in some way by the ocean, and this is a thing that we haven't even exleoprd — five percent. The thing I want to leave you with is, in that five percent, I showed you some cool stuff. There's a lot more cool stuff — every dive we go on in the ocean, we find something new about the sea. So what's in that other 95 peencrt? Did we get the exciting stuff or is there more out there? And I'm here to tell you that the ocean is full of surprises. There's a quote I love by marecl Proust: "The true voyage of exploration is not so much in seeking new landscapes," which we do, "but in having new eyes." And so I hope today, by showing you some of this, it's given you some new eyes about this planet, and for the first time, I want you to think about it dtnfrlfieey. Thank you very much. Thank you. (auaspple)

Open Cloze

You know, I had a real rough time in ______ with ADD, and I have a PhD. I earned a PhD, but ... tough to pay attention — biology, _______, physics, chemistry — really tough for me. Only one thing grabbed my attention, and it's that planet called Earth. But in this picture here, you'll see that Earth is mostly water. That's the Pacific. Seventy percent of Earth is covered with water. You can say, "Hey, I know Earth. I live here." You don't know Earth. You don't know this planet, because most of it's covered with that — average depth, two miles. And when you go outside and look up at the Empire State ________, Chrysler Building, the average depth of the ocean is 15 of those on top of one another. We've explored about five percent of what's in that water. "Explored," meaning, for the first time, go peek and see what's there. So what I want to do today is show you some things about this planet, about the oceans. I want to take you from shallow water down to the deep water, and hopefully, like me, you'll see some things that get you ______ on exploring planet Earth. You know things like corals; you've seen plenty of corals, those of you who've been to the beach, __________, know ______ are an _______ place to go — full of life, some big animals, small animals, some nice, some dangerous, sharks, whales, all that stuff. They need to be protected from humanity. They're great places. But what you probably don't know is in the very deep part of the ocean, we have volcanic eruptions. Most _________ on Earth are at the bottom of the sea — more than 80 percent. And we actually have fire, fire deep inside the ocean, going on right now. All over the _____ — in the Pacific, the ________, the Indian Ocean. In this _____, the ocean _____, the rocks actually turn to liquid. So you actually have waves on the ocean floor. You'd say nothing could live there, but when we look in detail, even there, in the deepest, _______ places on Earth, we find life, which tells us that life really wants to ______. So, pretty amazing stuff. Every time we go to the bottom of the sea, we explore with our submarines, with our robots, we see something that's usually surprising, sometimes it's startling and sometimes revolutionary. You see that puddle of water sitting there. And all around the water there's a little _____, there's a little white _____ beach. We'll get closer, you'll see the _____ a little bit better, some of the waves in that water, down there. The thing that's _______ about this water is that it's at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. So you're sitting inside a _________, looking out the window at a little pond of water beneath the sea. We see ponds, we see lakes, we see rivers — in fact, right here is a _____ at the bottom of the ocean going from the lower left to the upper right. Water is actually flowing through there. This totally blew our minds. How can you have this at the bottom? You're in the ocean looking at more water. And there's animals that only live in that water. So, the bottom of the ocean — I love this map, because it _____ in the ______ of the ocean, there's a mountain range. It's the greatest ________ _____ on _____, called the mid-ocean _____ — 50,000 _____ long, and we've hardly had a peek at it. Hardly had a peek at it. We find valleys, many thousands of valleys, larger, wider, deeper than the Grand Canyon. We find, as I said, underwater lakes, ______, waterfalls. The largest waterfall on the planet is actually under the ocean, up near Iceland. All that stuff is in that five percent that we've explored. So the deal about the ocean is that to explore it, you've got to have technology. Not only technology, but it's not just Dave _____ or one person exploring, it's a team of people. You've got to have the talent, the team. You've got to have the technology. In this case, it's our ship, Atlantis, and the submarine, Alvin. Inside that submarine — this is an Alvin launch — there's three people. They're being wheeled out onto deck. There's 47 other people, the teamwork on that ship, making sure that these people are okay. Everybody in that submarine is ________ one thing right now: Should I have gone to the bathroom one more time? Because you're in there for 10 hours — 10 _____ in that little sphere. Three of you together and nobody is going to be around you. You go into the water and once you hit the water, it's amazing. There's a lovely color blue that penetrates right inside you. You don't hear the surface ship anymore, you hear that pinging of a sonar. If you've got an iPhone you've got sonar on there — it's that same pinging that goes down to the bottom and comes back up. ______ _____ out the sub to make sure the outside is okay, and then they say "Go," and down you go to the bottom of the ocean and it's an amazing trip. So for two and a half hours, you sink down to the ______. And two hours of it is totally pitch black. We thought that nothing could live inside that world at the bottom of the ocean. And when we look, we find some amazing things. All the way down — we call it the mid-water — from the top of the ocean down to the bottom, we find life. Whenever we stop and look, we find life. I'm going to show you some jellies. They're absolutely some of the _______ creatures on Earth. Look at that thing, just ________ his arms around. That's like a little lobster. That one is like all these _______ with their ______ hooked together, the colonial animals. Some animals are tiny, some can be longer than this _____. Just amazing animals. And you can't collect them with a net — we have to go with our cameras and take a look at them. So every time we go, new species of life. The _____ is full of life. And yet the deepest part of the ocean — when we go to that mountain range, we find hot springs. Now we were sure — because this is poisonous _____, because it's so deep it would crush the Titanic the same way you crush an _____ cup in your hand — we were sure there would be no life there at all. Instead, we find more life and diversity and _______ than in the tropical rainforest. So, in one instance, in one peek out the window of the sub, we discover something that revolutionizes the way we think about life on Earth; and that is, you don't always have to have sunlight to get life going. There's big animals down there too, some that look familiar. That guy's called _____. I love him. Dumbo's great. This guy — oh man, I wish I had more footage of this. We're trying to get an expedition together to go look at this and maybe in a year we'll have that. Go online and look. Vampyroteuthis infernalis. The _______ squid. Incredibly cool. In the darkness of the deep sea, he's got glowing tentacles, so if I'm coming at you like him, I put my arms out in the ________ so all you see are little glowing things over here. Meanwhile, I'm coming at you. When he wants to ______, he's got these glowing pods on his butt that look like eyes. Glowing eyes on his butt. How cool is that? Just an amazing animal. (________) "Vampire" _____, because when it gets protective, it _____ this black cape over its whole body, and curls up into a ball. Outrageous animal. This ship, "The Ship of Dreams" — a hundred years ago this ______ _____, this ship was ________ to show up in New York. It's the Titanic. I co-led an __________ out there last year. We are learning so much about that ship. The _______ is an interesting place for _______, because animals are moving in to live on the Titanic. Microbes are actually eating the hull of the Titanic. That's where Jack was king of the world there on the bow of the Titanic. So we're doing real good. And what's exciting to me is that we're ______ a virtual Titanic, so you can sit there at home with your ________ and your headset on, and you can actually explore the Titanic for yourself. That's what we want to do, make these virtual worlds, so it's not Dave Gallo or someone else exploring the world; it's you. You _______ it for yourself. So here's the bottom line: The oceans are unexplored and I can't begin to tell you how important that is, because they're _________ to us. Seven _______ people live on this planet and all of us are impacted by the sea, because the oceans _______ the air you breathe, the water you drink, the food you eat. All those are controlled in some way by the ocean, and this is a thing that we haven't even ________ — five percent. The thing I want to leave you with is, in that five percent, I showed you some cool stuff. There's a lot more cool stuff — every dive we go on in the ocean, we find something new about the sea. So what's in that other 95 _______? Did we get the exciting stuff or is there more out there? And I'm here to tell you that the ocean is full of surprises. There's a quote I love by ______ Proust: "The true voyage of exploration is not so much in seeking new landscapes," which we do, "but in having new eyes." And so I hope today, by showing you some of this, it's given you some new eyes about this planet, and for the first time, I want you to think about it ___________. Thank you very much. Thank you. (________)

Solution

  1. darkness
  2. explored
  3. range
  4. explore
  5. squid
  6. animals
  7. earth
  8. dumbo
  9. important
  10. pulls
  11. school
  12. applause
  13. marcel
  14. happen
  15. titanic
  16. density
  17. billion
  18. coming
  19. gallo
  20. submarine
  21. percent
  22. april
  23. coolest
  24. world
  25. darkest
  26. empty
  27. ocean
  28. mouths
  29. geology
  30. stage
  31. river
  32. cliff
  33. building
  34. amazing
  35. hours
  36. laughter
  37. rivers
  38. water
  39. supposed
  40. escape
  41. joystick
  42. making
  43. check
  44. control
  45. thinking
  46. expedition
  47. shows
  48. biology
  49. miles
  50. floor
  51. ridge
  52. atlantic
  53. vampire
  54. flailing
  55. differently
  56. mountain
  57. hooked
  58. snorkeling
  59. bottom
  60. beach
  61. special
  62. middle
  63. place
  64. divers
  65. volcanoes
  66. corals
  67. sandy

Original Text

You know, I had a real rough time in school with ADD, and I have a PhD. I earned a PhD, but ... tough to pay attention — biology, geology, physics, chemistry — really tough for me. Only one thing grabbed my attention, and it's that planet called Earth. But in this picture here, you'll see that Earth is mostly water. That's the Pacific. Seventy percent of Earth is covered with water. You can say, "Hey, I know Earth. I live here." You don't know Earth. You don't know this planet, because most of it's covered with that — average depth, two miles. And when you go outside and look up at the Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, the average depth of the ocean is 15 of those on top of one another. We've explored about five percent of what's in that water. "Explored," meaning, for the first time, go peek and see what's there. So what I want to do today is show you some things about this planet, about the oceans. I want to take you from shallow water down to the deep water, and hopefully, like me, you'll see some things that get you hooked on exploring planet Earth. You know things like corals; you've seen plenty of corals, those of you who've been to the beach, snorkeling, know corals are an amazing place to go — full of life, some big animals, small animals, some nice, some dangerous, sharks, whales, all that stuff. They need to be protected from humanity. They're great places. But what you probably don't know is in the very deep part of the ocean, we have volcanic eruptions. Most volcanoes on Earth are at the bottom of the sea — more than 80 percent. And we actually have fire, fire deep inside the ocean, going on right now. All over the world — in the Pacific, the Atlantic, the Indian Ocean. In this place, the ocean floor, the rocks actually turn to liquid. So you actually have waves on the ocean floor. You'd say nothing could live there, but when we look in detail, even there, in the deepest, darkest places on Earth, we find life, which tells us that life really wants to happen. So, pretty amazing stuff. Every time we go to the bottom of the sea, we explore with our submarines, with our robots, we see something that's usually surprising, sometimes it's startling and sometimes revolutionary. You see that puddle of water sitting there. And all around the water there's a little cliff, there's a little white sandy beach. We'll get closer, you'll see the beach a little bit better, some of the waves in that water, down there. The thing that's special about this water is that it's at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. So you're sitting inside a submarine, looking out the window at a little pond of water beneath the sea. We see ponds, we see lakes, we see rivers — in fact, right here is a river at the bottom of the ocean going from the lower left to the upper right. Water is actually flowing through there. This totally blew our minds. How can you have this at the bottom? You're in the ocean looking at more water. And there's animals that only live in that water. So, the bottom of the ocean — I love this map, because it shows in the middle of the ocean, there's a mountain range. It's the greatest mountain range on Earth, called the mid-ocean ridge — 50,000 miles long, and we've hardly had a peek at it. Hardly had a peek at it. We find valleys, many thousands of valleys, larger, wider, deeper than the Grand Canyon. We find, as I said, underwater lakes, rivers, waterfalls. The largest waterfall on the planet is actually under the ocean, up near Iceland. All that stuff is in that five percent that we've explored. So the deal about the ocean is that to explore it, you've got to have technology. Not only technology, but it's not just Dave Gallo or one person exploring, it's a team of people. You've got to have the talent, the team. You've got to have the technology. In this case, it's our ship, Atlantis, and the submarine, Alvin. Inside that submarine — this is an Alvin launch — there's three people. They're being wheeled out onto deck. There's 47 other people, the teamwork on that ship, making sure that these people are okay. Everybody in that submarine is thinking one thing right now: Should I have gone to the bathroom one more time? Because you're in there for 10 hours — 10 hours in that little sphere. Three of you together and nobody is going to be around you. You go into the water and once you hit the water, it's amazing. There's a lovely color blue that penetrates right inside you. You don't hear the surface ship anymore, you hear that pinging of a sonar. If you've got an iPhone you've got sonar on there — it's that same pinging that goes down to the bottom and comes back up. Divers check out the sub to make sure the outside is okay, and then they say "Go," and down you go to the bottom of the ocean and it's an amazing trip. So for two and a half hours, you sink down to the bottom. And two hours of it is totally pitch black. We thought that nothing could live inside that world at the bottom of the ocean. And when we look, we find some amazing things. All the way down — we call it the mid-water — from the top of the ocean down to the bottom, we find life. Whenever we stop and look, we find life. I'm going to show you some jellies. They're absolutely some of the coolest creatures on Earth. Look at that thing, just flailing his arms around. That's like a little lobster. That one is like all these animals with their mouths hooked together, the colonial animals. Some animals are tiny, some can be longer than this stage. Just amazing animals. And you can't collect them with a net — we have to go with our cameras and take a look at them. So every time we go, new species of life. The ocean is full of life. And yet the deepest part of the ocean — when we go to that mountain range, we find hot springs. Now we were sure — because this is poisonous water, because it's so deep it would crush the Titanic the same way you crush an empty cup in your hand — we were sure there would be no life there at all. Instead, we find more life and diversity and density than in the tropical rainforest. So, in one instance, in one peek out the window of the sub, we discover something that revolutionizes the way we think about life on Earth; and that is, you don't always have to have sunlight to get life going. There's big animals down there too, some that look familiar. That guy's called Dumbo. I love him. Dumbo's great. This guy — oh man, I wish I had more footage of this. We're trying to get an expedition together to go look at this and maybe in a year we'll have that. Go online and look. Vampyroteuthis infernalis. The vampire squid. Incredibly cool. In the darkness of the deep sea, he's got glowing tentacles, so if I'm coming at you like him, I put my arms out in the darkness so all you see are little glowing things over here. Meanwhile, I'm coming at you. When he wants to escape, he's got these glowing pods on his butt that look like eyes. Glowing eyes on his butt. How cool is that? Just an amazing animal. (Laughter) "Vampire" squid, because when it gets protective, it pulls this black cape over its whole body, and curls up into a ball. Outrageous animal. This ship, "The Ship of Dreams" — a hundred years ago this coming April, this ship was supposed to show up in New York. It's the Titanic. I co-led an expedition out there last year. We are learning so much about that ship. The Titanic is an interesting place for biology, because animals are moving in to live on the Titanic. Microbes are actually eating the hull of the Titanic. That's where Jack was king of the world there on the bow of the Titanic. So we're doing real good. And what's exciting to me is that we're making a virtual Titanic, so you can sit there at home with your joystick and your headset on, and you can actually explore the Titanic for yourself. That's what we want to do, make these virtual worlds, so it's not Dave Gallo or someone else exploring the world; it's you. You explore it for yourself. So here's the bottom line: The oceans are unexplored and I can't begin to tell you how important that is, because they're important to us. Seven billion people live on this planet and all of us are impacted by the sea, because the oceans control the air you breathe, the water you drink, the food you eat. All those are controlled in some way by the ocean, and this is a thing that we haven't even explored — five percent. The thing I want to leave you with is, in that five percent, I showed you some cool stuff. There's a lot more cool stuff — every dive we go on in the ocean, we find something new about the sea. So what's in that other 95 percent? Did we get the exciting stuff or is there more out there? And I'm here to tell you that the ocean is full of surprises. There's a quote I love by Marcel Proust: "The true voyage of exploration is not so much in seeking new landscapes," which we do, "but in having new eyes." And so I hope today, by showing you some of this, it's given you some new eyes about this planet, and for the first time, I want you to think about it differently. Thank you very much. Thank you. (Applause)

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
mountain range 3
find life 3

Important Words

  1. absolutely
  2. add
  3. air
  4. alvin
  5. amazing
  6. animal
  7. animals
  8. anymore
  9. applause
  10. april
  11. arms
  12. atlantic
  13. atlantis
  14. attention
  15. average
  16. ball
  17. bathroom
  18. beach
  19. beneath
  20. big
  21. billion
  22. biology
  23. bit
  24. black
  25. blew
  26. blue
  27. body
  28. bottom
  29. bow
  30. breathe
  31. building
  32. butt
  33. call
  34. called
  35. cameras
  36. canyon
  37. cape
  38. case
  39. check
  40. chemistry
  41. chrysler
  42. cliff
  43. closer
  44. collect
  45. colonial
  46. color
  47. coming
  48. control
  49. controlled
  50. cool
  51. coolest
  52. corals
  53. covered
  54. creatures
  55. crush
  56. cup
  57. curls
  58. dangerous
  59. darkest
  60. darkness
  61. dave
  62. deal
  63. deck
  64. deep
  65. deeper
  66. deepest
  67. density
  68. depth
  69. detail
  70. differently
  71. discover
  72. dive
  73. divers
  74. diversity
  75. drink
  76. dumbo
  77. earned
  78. earth
  79. eat
  80. eating
  81. empire
  82. empty
  83. eruptions
  84. escape
  85. exciting
  86. expedition
  87. exploration
  88. explore
  89. explored
  90. exploring
  91. eyes
  92. fact
  93. familiar
  94. find
  95. fire
  96. flailing
  97. floor
  98. flowing
  99. food
  100. footage
  101. full
  102. gallo
  103. geology
  104. glowing
  105. good
  106. grabbed
  107. grand
  108. great
  109. greatest
  110. gulf
  111. guy
  112. hand
  113. happen
  114. headset
  115. hear
  116. hit
  117. home
  118. hooked
  119. hope
  120. hot
  121. hours
  122. hull
  123. humanity
  124. iceland
  125. impacted
  126. important
  127. incredibly
  128. indian
  129. infernalis
  130. instance
  131. interesting
  132. iphone
  133. jack
  134. jellies
  135. joystick
  136. king
  137. lakes
  138. landscapes
  139. larger
  140. largest
  141. laughter
  142. launch
  143. learning
  144. leave
  145. left
  146. life
  147. liquid
  148. live
  149. lobster
  150. long
  151. longer
  152. lot
  153. love
  154. lovely
  155. making
  156. man
  157. map
  158. marcel
  159. meaning
  160. mexico
  161. microbes
  162. middle
  163. miles
  164. minds
  165. mountain
  166. mouths
  167. moving
  168. net
  169. nice
  170. ocean
  171. oceans
  172. online
  173. outrageous
  174. pacific
  175. part
  176. pay
  177. peek
  178. penetrates
  179. people
  180. percent
  181. person
  182. phd
  183. physics
  184. picture
  185. pinging
  186. pitch
  187. place
  188. places
  189. planet
  190. plenty
  191. pods
  192. poisonous
  193. pond
  194. ponds
  195. pretty
  196. protected
  197. protective
  198. puddle
  199. pulls
  200. put
  201. quote
  202. rainforest
  203. range
  204. real
  205. revolutionary
  206. revolutionizes
  207. ridge
  208. river
  209. rivers
  210. robots
  211. rocks
  212. rough
  213. sandy
  214. school
  215. sea
  216. seeking
  217. seventy
  218. shallow
  219. sharks
  220. ship
  221. show
  222. showed
  223. showing
  224. shows
  225. sink
  226. sit
  227. sitting
  228. small
  229. snorkeling
  230. sonar
  231. special
  232. species
  233. sphere
  234. springs
  235. squid
  236. stage
  237. startling
  238. state
  239. stop
  240. stuff
  241. submarine
  242. submarines
  243. sunlight
  244. supposed
  245. surface
  246. surprises
  247. surprising
  248. talent
  249. team
  250. teamwork
  251. technology
  252. tells
  253. tentacles
  254. thinking
  255. thought
  256. thousands
  257. time
  258. tiny
  259. titanic
  260. today
  261. top
  262. totally
  263. tough
  264. trip
  265. tropical
  266. true
  267. turn
  268. underwater
  269. unexplored
  270. upper
  271. valleys
  272. vampire
  273. vampyroteuthis
  274. virtual
  275. volcanic
  276. volcanoes
  277. voyage
  278. water
  279. waterfall
  280. waterfalls
  281. waves
  282. whales
  283. wheeled
  284. white
  285. wider
  286. window
  287. world
  288. worlds
  289. year
  290. years
  291. york