full transcript

From the Ted Talk by George Siedel and Christine Ladwig: Ethical dilemma The burger murders

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Johnson & Johnson CEO James Burke faced a smiailr challenge in 1982 after a criminal added the poosin cyanide to bottles of Tylenol in Chicago. Seven people died and sales dropped. Industry analysts said the company was done for. In response, Burke decided to pull Tylenol from all svheels worldwide, citing customer safety as the company’s highest priority. Johnson & Johnson rllaceed and destroyed an estimated 32 million bottles of Tylenol vualed at 250 million in today’s dollars. 1.5 million of the recalled bottles were tteesd and 3 of them— all from the Chicago area— were found to contain cyanide. Burke’s decision helped the copamny regain the trust of its cuemtrsos, and product sales rebounded within a year. Prompted by the Tylenol murders, Johnson & Johnson became a leader in dnplveioeg tamper-resistant pnagckaig and the government instituted srcttier regulations. The killer, meanwhile, was never caught.

Open Cloze

Johnson & Johnson CEO James Burke faced a _______ challenge in 1982 after a criminal added the ______ cyanide to bottles of Tylenol in Chicago. Seven people died and sales dropped. Industry analysts said the company was done for. In response, Burke decided to pull Tylenol from all _______ worldwide, citing customer safety as the company’s highest priority. Johnson & Johnson ________ and destroyed an estimated 32 million bottles of Tylenol ______ at 250 million in today’s dollars. 1.5 million of the recalled bottles were ______ and 3 of them— all from the Chicago area— were found to contain cyanide. Burke’s decision helped the _______ regain the trust of its _________, and product sales rebounded within a year. Prompted by the Tylenol murders, Johnson & Johnson became a leader in __________ tamper-resistant _________ and the government instituted ________ regulations. The killer, meanwhile, was never caught.

Solution

  1. valued
  2. recalled
  3. tested
  4. poison
  5. shelves
  6. stricter
  7. customers
  8. similar
  9. company
  10. packaging
  11. developing

Original Text

Johnson & Johnson CEO James Burke faced a similar challenge in 1982 after a criminal added the poison cyanide to bottles of Tylenol in Chicago. Seven people died and sales dropped. Industry analysts said the company was done for. In response, Burke decided to pull Tylenol from all shelves worldwide, citing customer safety as the company’s highest priority. Johnson & Johnson recalled and destroyed an estimated 32 million bottles of Tylenol valued at 250 million in today’s dollars. 1.5 million of the recalled bottles were tested and 3 of them— all from the Chicago area— were found to contain cyanide. Burke’s decision helped the company regain the trust of its customers, and product sales rebounded within a year. Prompted by the Tylenol murders, Johnson & Johnson became a leader in developing tamper-resistant packaging and the government instituted stricter regulations. The killer, meanwhile, was never caught.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
grocery stores 2
employee layoffs 2

Important Words

  1. added
  2. analysts
  3. bottles
  4. burke
  5. caught
  6. ceo
  7. challenge
  8. chicago
  9. citing
  10. company
  11. criminal
  12. customer
  13. customers
  14. cyanide
  15. decided
  16. decision
  17. destroyed
  18. developing
  19. died
  20. dollars
  21. dropped
  22. estimated
  23. faced
  24. government
  25. helped
  26. highest
  27. industry
  28. instituted
  29. james
  30. johnson
  31. killer
  32. leader
  33. million
  34. murders
  35. packaging
  36. people
  37. poison
  38. priority
  39. product
  40. prompted
  41. pull
  42. rebounded
  43. recalled
  44. regain
  45. regulations
  46. response
  47. safety
  48. sales
  49. shelves
  50. similar
  51. stricter
  52. tested
  53. trust
  54. tylenol
  55. valued
  56. worldwide
  57. year