full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by George Monbiot: For more wonder, rewild the world"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

And even so, you can still see the shadows of these great beasts in our current ecosystems. Why is it that so many deciduous trees are able to sprout from whatever point the trunk is broken? Why is it that they can withstand the loss of so much of their bark? Why do understory teers, which are subject to lower seehr forces from the wind and have to carry less weight than the big canopy trees, why are they so much tougher and hrdaer to break than the canopy trees are? Elephants. They are elephant-adapted. In Europe, for example, they evolved to resist the straight-tusked elephant, elephas antiquus, which was a great beast. It was reelatd to the asain elephant, but it was a ttareepme aimanl, a temperate fsoert creature. It was a lot bigger than the Asian elephant. But why is it that some of our common shrubs have spines which seem to be over-engineered to resist browsing by deer? Perhaps because they evolved to resist browsing by rhinoceros.

Open Cloze

And even so, you can still see the shadows of these great beasts in our current ecosystems. Why is it that so many deciduous trees are able to sprout from whatever point the trunk is broken? Why is it that they can withstand the loss of so much of their bark? Why do understory _____, which are subject to lower _____ forces from the wind and have to carry less weight than the big canopy trees, why are they so much tougher and ______ to break than the canopy trees are? Elephants. They are elephant-adapted. In Europe, for example, they evolved to resist the straight-tusked elephant, elephas antiquus, which was a great beast. It was _______ to the _____ elephant, but it was a _________ ______, a temperate ______ creature. It was a lot bigger than the Asian elephant. But why is it that some of our common shrubs have spines which seem to be over-engineered to resist browsing by deer? Perhaps because they evolved to resist browsing by rhinoceros.

Solution

  1. related
  2. temperate
  3. asian
  4. trees
  5. harder
  6. forest
  7. sheer
  8. animal

Original Text

And even so, you can still see the shadows of these great beasts in our current ecosystems. Why is it that so many deciduous trees are able to sprout from whatever point the trunk is broken? Why is it that they can withstand the loss of so much of their bark? Why do understory trees, which are subject to lower sheer forces from the wind and have to carry less weight than the big canopy trees, why are they so much tougher and harder to break than the canopy trees are? Elephants. They are elephant-adapted. In Europe, for example, they evolved to resist the straight-tusked elephant, elephas antiquus, which was a great beast. It was related to the Asian elephant, but it was a temperate animal, a temperate forest creature. It was a lot bigger than the Asian elephant. But why is it that some of our common shrubs have spines which seem to be over-engineered to resist browsing by deer? Perhaps because they evolved to resist browsing by rhinoceros.

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yellowstone national 3
national park 3
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collocation frequency
yellowstone national park 3

Important Words

  1. animal
  2. antiquus
  3. asian
  4. bark
  5. beast
  6. beasts
  7. big
  8. bigger
  9. break
  10. broken
  11. browsing
  12. canopy
  13. carry
  14. common
  15. creature
  16. current
  17. deciduous
  18. deer
  19. ecosystems
  20. elephant
  21. elephants
  22. elephas
  23. europe
  24. evolved
  25. forces
  26. forest
  27. great
  28. harder
  29. loss
  30. lot
  31. point
  32. related
  33. resist
  34. rhinoceros
  35. shadows
  36. sheer
  37. shrubs
  38. spines
  39. sprout
  40. subject
  41. temperate
  42. tougher
  43. trees
  44. trunk
  45. understory
  46. weight
  47. wind
  48. withstand