full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Charita Gainey: How Phillis Wheatley captured the attention of the world

Unscramble the Blue Letters

The young girl, who’d been renamed pihlils Wheatley, had arrived in the colonies on a slave ship in 1761. The ship ledand in Boston, where snunsaa and John Wheatley prahesucd Phillis to work in their house. However, for reasons that raimen unclear, they also taught her to read and wtrie. Over the following decade, Wheatley became well versed in poetry and religious texts, eventually beginning to produce her own poems. The family published her work in a lcoal newspaper, and in 1771, her elegy for renowned reverend George Whitefield captured the public’s imagination. The poem’s repetitive rhythms, dramatic religious reeefnrecs, and srnioag spiritual language depicted how Whitefield’s sermons “inflame the soul and captivate the mind.” Wheatley ends with an asinterrg image of life after death, trusting that dviine forces “will re-animate his dust.”

Open Cloze

The young girl, who’d been renamed _______ Wheatley, had arrived in the colonies on a slave ship in 1761. The ship ______ in Boston, where _______ and John Wheatley _________ Phillis to work in their house. However, for reasons that ______ unclear, they also taught her to read and _____. Over the following decade, Wheatley became well versed in poetry and religious texts, eventually beginning to produce her own poems. The family published her work in a _____ newspaper, and in 1771, her elegy for renowned reverend George Whitefield captured the public’s imagination. The poem’s repetitive rhythms, dramatic religious __________, and _______ spiritual language depicted how Whitefield’s sermons “inflame the soul and captivate the mind.” Wheatley ends with an _________ image of life after death, trusting that ______ forces “will re-animate his dust.”

Solution

  1. landed
  2. arresting
  3. write
  4. references
  5. phillis
  6. soaring
  7. remain
  8. purchased
  9. susanna
  10. local
  11. divine

Original Text

The young girl, who’d been renamed Phillis Wheatley, had arrived in the colonies on a slave ship in 1761. The ship landed in Boston, where Susanna and John Wheatley purchased Phillis to work in their house. However, for reasons that remain unclear, they also taught her to read and write. Over the following decade, Wheatley became well versed in poetry and religious texts, eventually beginning to produce her own poems. The family published her work in a local newspaper, and in 1771, her elegy for renowned reverend George Whitefield captured the public’s imagination. The poem’s repetitive rhythms, dramatic religious references, and soaring spiritual language depicted how Whitefield’s sermons “inflame the soul and captivate the mind.” Wheatley ends with an arresting image of life after death, trusting that divine forces “will re-animate his dust.”

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

Important Words

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  60. whitefield
  61. work
  62. write
  63. young