full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by John Maeda: How art, technology and design inform creative leaders"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

And that always stuck with me all my life. Why didn't Dad say art? Why wasn't it okay? Why? It became a qsioeutn my etrine life, and that's all right, because being good at math meant he bohugt me a computer, and some of you remember this computer, this was my first computer. Who had an Apple II? Apple II usres, very cool. (Applause) As you rmemeebr, the Apple II did nothing at all. (lateughr) You'd plug it in, you'd type in it and geern text would come out. It would say you're wrong most of the time. That was the computer we knew. That computer is a computer that I learend about going to MIT, my father's deram. And at MIT, however, I learned about the computer at all levels, and after, I went to art school to get away from computers, and I began to think about the computer as more of a spiritual space of thinking. And I was influenced by performance art — so this is 20 years ago. I made a computer out of people. It was called the Human Powered Computer empixreent. I have a power manager, mouse drievr, memory, etc., and I built this in Kyoto, the old capital of jpaan. It's a room broken in two healvs. I've turned the computer on, and these assistants are placing a giant floppy disk built out of cardboard, and it's put into the computer. And the floppy disk drive person waers it. (Laughter) She finds the first sector on the disk, and tkeas data off the disk and passes it off to, of course, the bus. So the bus diligently carries the data into the cptmoeur to the mmeroy, to the CPU, the VRAM, etc., and it's an aacutl working computer. That's a bus, really. (Laughter) And it looks kind of fast. That's a mouse driver, where it's XY. (Laughter) It looks like it's happening kind of quickly, but it's actually a very slow computer, and when I rzeleaid how slow this computer was compared to how fast a computer is, it made me wonder about computers and technology in general.

Open Cloze

And that always stuck with me all my life. Why didn't Dad say art? Why wasn't it okay? Why? It became a ________ my ______ life, and that's all right, because being good at math meant he ______ me a computer, and some of you remember this computer, this was my first computer. Who had an Apple II? Apple II _____, very cool. (Applause) As you ________, the Apple II did nothing at all. (________) You'd plug it in, you'd type in it and _____ text would come out. It would say you're wrong most of the time. That was the computer we knew. That computer is a computer that I _______ about going to MIT, my father's _____. And at MIT, however, I learned about the computer at all levels, and after, I went to art school to get away from computers, and I began to think about the computer as more of a spiritual space of thinking. And I was influenced by performance art — so this is 20 years ago. I made a computer out of people. It was called the Human Powered Computer __________. I have a power manager, mouse ______, memory, etc., and I built this in Kyoto, the old capital of _____. It's a room broken in two ______. I've turned the computer on, and these assistants are placing a giant floppy disk built out of cardboard, and it's put into the computer. And the floppy disk drive person _____ it. (Laughter) She finds the first sector on the disk, and _____ data off the disk and passes it off to, of course, the bus. So the bus diligently carries the data into the ________ to the ______, to the CPU, the VRAM, etc., and it's an ______ working computer. That's a bus, really. (Laughter) And it looks kind of fast. That's a mouse driver, where it's XY. (Laughter) It looks like it's happening kind of quickly, but it's actually a very slow computer, and when I ________ how slow this computer was compared to how fast a computer is, it made me wonder about computers and technology in general.

Solution

  1. learned
  2. dream
  3. realized
  4. experiment
  5. halves
  6. driver
  7. actual
  8. question
  9. japan
  10. laughter
  11. remember
  12. takes
  13. entire
  14. memory
  15. bought
  16. wears
  17. green
  18. computer
  19. users

Original Text

And that always stuck with me all my life. Why didn't Dad say art? Why wasn't it okay? Why? It became a question my entire life, and that's all right, because being good at math meant he bought me a computer, and some of you remember this computer, this was my first computer. Who had an Apple II? Apple II users, very cool. (Applause) As you remember, the Apple II did nothing at all. (Laughter) You'd plug it in, you'd type in it and green text would come out. It would say you're wrong most of the time. That was the computer we knew. That computer is a computer that I learned about going to MIT, my father's dream. And at MIT, however, I learned about the computer at all levels, and after, I went to art school to get away from computers, and I began to think about the computer as more of a spiritual space of thinking. And I was influenced by performance art — so this is 20 years ago. I made a computer out of people. It was called the Human Powered Computer Experiment. I have a power manager, mouse driver, memory, etc., and I built this in Kyoto, the old capital of Japan. It's a room broken in two halves. I've turned the computer on, and these assistants are placing a giant floppy disk built out of cardboard, and it's put into the computer. And the floppy disk drive person wears it. (Laughter) She finds the first sector on the disk, and takes data off the disk and passes it off to, of course, the bus. So the bus diligently carries the data into the computer to the memory, to the CPU, the VRAM, etc., and it's an actual working computer. That's a bus, really. (Laughter) And it looks kind of fast. That's a mouse driver, where it's XY. (Laughter) It looks like it's happening kind of quickly, but it's actually a very slow computer, and when I realized how slow this computer was compared to how fast a computer is, it made me wonder about computers and technology in general.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
apple ii 4
light helvetica 3
form content 3
typing noises 3

Important Words

  1. actual
  2. applause
  3. apple
  4. art
  5. assistants
  6. began
  7. bought
  8. broken
  9. built
  10. bus
  11. called
  12. capital
  13. cardboard
  14. carries
  15. compared
  16. computer
  17. computers
  18. cool
  19. cpu
  20. dad
  21. data
  22. diligently
  23. disk
  24. dream
  25. drive
  26. driver
  27. entire
  28. experiment
  29. fast
  30. finds
  31. floppy
  32. general
  33. giant
  34. good
  35. green
  36. halves
  37. happening
  38. human
  39. ii
  40. influenced
  41. japan
  42. kind
  43. knew
  44. kyoto
  45. laughter
  46. learned
  47. levels
  48. life
  49. manager
  50. math
  51. meant
  52. memory
  53. mit
  54. mouse
  55. passes
  56. people
  57. performance
  58. person
  59. placing
  60. plug
  61. power
  62. powered
  63. put
  64. question
  65. quickly
  66. realized
  67. remember
  68. room
  69. school
  70. sector
  71. slow
  72. space
  73. spiritual
  74. stuck
  75. takes
  76. technology
  77. text
  78. thinking
  79. time
  80. turned
  81. type
  82. users
  83. vram
  84. wears
  85. working
  86. wrong
  87. xy
  88. years