full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Jason Clay: How big brands can help save biodiversity"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Now this is God's work, but it's not my work. It's not the work I set out to do. So I was at a gaefrutl Dead bfeinet concert on the rainforests in 1988. I met a guy — the guy on the left. His name was Ben. He said, "What can I do to save the rainforests?" I said, "Well, Ben, what do you do?" "I make ice cream." So I said, "Well, you've got to make a rsoniefart ice cream. And you've got to use nuts from the rfrsienaots to show that forests are worth more as forests than they are as pasture." He said, "Okay." Within a year, Rainforest ccurnh was on the shelves. It was a great success. We did our first million-dollars-worth of trade by bnyuig on 30 days and selling on 21. That gets your adrenaline going. Then we had a four and a half million-dollar line of credit because we were credit-worthy at that point. We had 15 to 20, maybe 22 percent of the global Brazil-nut mraekt. We paid two to three teims more than anybody else. Everybody else raised their prices to the gatherers of Brazil nuts because we would buy it otherwise. A great success. 50 companies singed up, 200 products came out, gteeernad 100 million in sales. It failed. Why did it fail? Because the people who were gathering Brazil nuts weren't the same people who were cintutg the forests. And the people who made money from Brazil nuts were not the peolpe who made money from cutting the forests. We were attacking the wrong driver. We needed to be working on beef. We needed to be working on lumber. We nedeed to be wrionkg on soy — things that we were not focused on.

Open Cloze

Now this is God's work, but it's not my work. It's not the work I set out to do. So I was at a ________ Dead _______ concert on the rainforests in 1988. I met a guy — the guy on the left. His name was Ben. He said, "What can I do to save the rainforests?" I said, "Well, Ben, what do you do?" "I make ice cream." So I said, "Well, you've got to make a __________ ice cream. And you've got to use nuts from the ___________ to show that forests are worth more as forests than they are as pasture." He said, "Okay." Within a year, Rainforest ______ was on the shelves. It was a great success. We did our first million-dollars-worth of trade by ______ on 30 days and selling on 21. That gets your adrenaline going. Then we had a four and a half million-dollar line of credit because we were credit-worthy at that point. We had 15 to 20, maybe 22 percent of the global Brazil-nut ______. We paid two to three _____ more than anybody else. Everybody else raised their prices to the gatherers of Brazil nuts because we would buy it otherwise. A great success. 50 companies ______ up, 200 products came out, _________ 100 million in sales. It failed. Why did it fail? Because the people who were gathering Brazil nuts weren't the same people who were _______ the forests. And the people who made money from Brazil nuts were not the ______ who made money from cutting the forests. We were attacking the wrong driver. We needed to be working on beef. We needed to be working on lumber. We ______ to be _______ on soy — things that we were not focused on.

Solution

  1. times
  2. rainforests
  3. needed
  4. rainforest
  5. grateful
  6. signed
  7. benefit
  8. people
  9. market
  10. generated
  11. working
  12. cutting
  13. buying
  14. crunch

Original Text

Now this is God's work, but it's not my work. It's not the work I set out to do. So I was at a Grateful Dead benefit concert on the rainforests in 1988. I met a guy — the guy on the left. His name was Ben. He said, "What can I do to save the rainforests?" I said, "Well, Ben, what do you do?" "I make ice cream." So I said, "Well, you've got to make a rainforest ice cream. And you've got to use nuts from the rainforests to show that forests are worth more as forests than they are as pasture." He said, "Okay." Within a year, Rainforest Crunch was on the shelves. It was a great success. We did our first million-dollars-worth of trade by buying on 30 days and selling on 21. That gets your adrenaline going. Then we had a four and a half million-dollar line of credit because we were credit-worthy at that point. We had 15 to 20, maybe 22 percent of the global Brazil-nut market. We paid two to three times more than anybody else. Everybody else raised their prices to the gatherers of Brazil nuts because we would buy it otherwise. A great success. 50 companies signed up, 200 products came out, generated 100 million in sales. It failed. Why did it fail? Because the people who were gathering Brazil nuts weren't the same people who were cutting the forests. And the people who made money from Brazil nuts were not the people who made money from cutting the forests. We were attacking the wrong driver. We needed to be working on beef. We needed to be working on lumber. We needed to be working on soy — things that we were not focused on.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
palm oil 8
chocolate company 3
brazil nuts 3

Important Words

  1. adrenaline
  2. attacking
  3. beef
  4. ben
  5. benefit
  6. brazil
  7. buy
  8. buying
  9. companies
  10. concert
  11. cream
  12. credit
  13. crunch
  14. cutting
  15. days
  16. dead
  17. driver
  18. fail
  19. failed
  20. focused
  21. forests
  22. gatherers
  23. gathering
  24. generated
  25. global
  26. grateful
  27. great
  28. guy
  29. ice
  30. left
  31. line
  32. lumber
  33. market
  34. met
  35. million
  36. money
  37. needed
  38. nuts
  39. paid
  40. pasture
  41. people
  42. percent
  43. point
  44. prices
  45. products
  46. rainforest
  47. rainforests
  48. raised
  49. sales
  50. save
  51. selling
  52. set
  53. shelves
  54. show
  55. signed
  56. soy
  57. success
  58. times
  59. trade
  60. work
  61. working
  62. worth
  63. wrong
  64. year