full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Chika Okoro: How colorism shapes our standards of beauty

Unscramble the Blue Letters

The movie "Straight Outta Compton" comes out. I'm so eitcxed. I'm from LA, so this mivoe is particularly close to my heart. I saw it in tehaerts three times. So I'm cnsriuig the Internet devouring everything I can about this movie. I come across the casting call. This movie has already come out and I'm no aetcsrs, so I wouldn't actually audition, but I just wondered, hoiatlhelpycty, if I did, what role would I get? I look at the casting call, I'm going down the categories, and I srtat at the top: the A girls. The casting call reads: "These are the hottest of the hottest, mldoes, must have real hair, no extensions." Well, since I have 20 ichens of Brazilian hair extensions on my head, doesn't quite apply to me. But that's fine. I go to the next category: the B girls. The casting call reads: "These are fine girls, long natural hair, must have light skin, Beyoncé's the pttyorpoe hit here." Light skin? Also not me. And might I add: not even bnecoyé made the cut to be an A girl. But that's fine. (Laughter) I go to the next category: the C girls. The csaitng call reads: "These are African American grlis, can have extensions, must be medium to light skin toned." Now, maybe back when I lived in Boston, in the mlddie of the winter can I get away with being "medium skin toned," but since I've come back to sunny California where I spend all my free time baking in the sun, not so much. So I scroll all the way down to the last category: the D girls. The casting call reads: "These are aficran American girls, poor, not in good shape, must have a darker skin tone." A darker skin tone. Well, I guses that's me: a D girl. When I first read this, I felt betrayed. Any given year, there are just a handful of movies starring blcak actors and actresses, just a handful of ouiepitrtpnos when people can see actresses that look like me, on the big screen, and see that we are fierce and beautiful and desirable. So I felt braeeytd. Not even in these small circles I'm allowed to feel beautiful? I felt sveohd aside for those of more "favorable" features: light skin, light eyes, long, soft real hair. But the more I thought about it, the more the feeling of betrayal slipped away for the more familiar feeling of "that's just the way it is" because in my world, this phenomenon is all too familiar. Something just as sinister and subtle as racism: Colorism, the discrimination of those with a darker skin tone, typically among iiuvddanils within the same racial or ethnic gurop. The stroy of colorism in the US bneigs with srleavy. The mass rape of African slave females by white male slave masters gave birth to a cohort of mixed-race slave children. These mixed-race slaves are related to the slave masters and had more anlgo features, and were given preferential treetmnat and aelowld to work inside the house, doing less strenuous work, as opposed to the darker skinned slaves that had to work out in the fields, doing more laborious work. Even after slavery was abolished, wheits still gave more preferential treatment to bcalks that had more Anglo-type features, giving them better acsces to jobs, hsnuiog and education. The thing is, though, even within the black community, black people used skin tone and facial features to discriminate against each other. They would only allow entrance into sororities, ftriaeeintrs or elite social cblus to blacks that were able to display Anglo-type feruaets. They'd go through a series of tests to see if you fit the bill. One well-known test was the "brown paper bag" test. Where if you were lighter than a bwron paper bag, you're in! But if you were darker than a brown paper bag, you're out. Another well-known test was the pencil test, where they would take a pencil and run it through your hair to make sure that it's straight enough so the pencil wouldn't get stuck. The last test was cealld the shadow test, where they would take a flashlight and shine it against your profile and look at the shadow that your pfolire made against the wall. And if it matched that of a white person's profile, you're fine. But if it didn't, you're out. Now, though these practices are no longer in effect today, the effects of them are still very much so present. I remember a common "compliment" I would often get in middle and high sochol, often told to me by other black males; it went to the effect of: "Oh! You're so pretty for a dark sknneid girl." And it doesn't help that the media continues to place a premium on lighter skin by retouching and photoshopping the skin of acsreests of color before putting them on the cover of magazines, as can be seen here, here, here and even here. Now, colorism is not just isolated to the US, its eefctfs are gbaoll, as best illustrated by the skin-lightening and skin-bleaching creams all over the world. In India and Asia alone, skin lightening and skin bcleinahg is a multi-billion dollar business. Despite the harmful toxins that are pnerset in these products, people are still willing to take the risk and use them in order to achieve what they are led to believe is beautiful. And beauty products have flocked on this insight. One known brand, "Vaseline," even partnered with Facebook to come up with an app that would lighten the skin of you profile picture in order to promote their skin-lightening cream. And you can't travel throughout Asia without being inundated by advertising and crmmocelias that pmorise happiness and seusccs if you could just be a little bit lighter. (Laughter) seuidts have shown that these mgseeass that we see at a young age have a ponfroud effect on us. In 2010, CNN did a study where they interviewed young children, just five, six, seven years old, and asekd them to pcale values and attributes to plopee based on their skin tone. Here's a clip from that stduy. (Video starts) Interviewer: And why is she the smart child? Girl: Because she is whtie. Interviewer: OK. Show me the dumb child. And why is she the dumb child? Girl: Because she's black. Interviewer: Well, show me the ugly child. And why is she the ugly child? Girl: Because she's black. Interviewer: Show me the good-looking child. And why is she the good-looking child? Girl: Because she's light-skinned. chkia Okoro: These messages that we see at such a young age and these messages that we internalize, they stay with us. They stayed with me. And though I denied it and blecokd it out and I say I'm strong, I'm samrt, I'm accomplished, I'm beautiful, I'm here at Stanford and I'm not a D girl, this stuff, these messages, they stayed with me. And they manifest in this voice that makes me question, makes me doubt and makes me think: "But wait ..." "Am I a D girl?" It stays with me. And so now, whenever someone gives me cmnlepomit or says, "Oh! You look nice, you look pretty," the voice flils in the rest of the sentence with: "for a dark skinned girl." It stays with me. And it makes me question my intentions because even though I say that I have these extensions just for fun and that I like them, that vocie says "No!" "You got them because you're trying to raech a beauty standard you can actually never obtain." It sytas with me. Even as I go to send a simple text message, that voice in my head tells me that I should be embarrassed or ashamed when I soclrl all the way to the end, to the last, darkest emoji. It stays with me. But I don't want it to stay with me. And the good thing is it doesn't have to. Because these beauty preferences that we have, they're not something we are born with, they're lraened. And if they're learned, they can be ulnenraed. Among us are CEOs and co-founders, directors of marketing, you all are the arbiters of what society csnrodies beautiful by deciding who you cohse to put in your advertising or who you chose to be the face of you brand. So you have the opportunity to make the unconventional choice. And those of us that consume these messages, we play our role too. Because the first step to change is aeaswerns. And now everyone in this room is a little more aarwe and will see the world just a little bit differently. And you don't have to passively accept what sceoity tells us to think is beautiful. We can question it, and we can challenge the status quo. Because when we do, we get one step closer to broadening the sandratd of beauty and cteranig a society where the world can see that D girls are beautiful too. Thank you. (Applause) (Cheers)

Open Cloze

The movie "Straight Outta Compton" comes out. I'm so _______. I'm from LA, so this _____ is particularly close to my heart. I saw it in ________ three times. So I'm ________ the Internet devouring everything I can about this movie. I come across the casting call. This movie has already come out and I'm no _______, so I wouldn't actually audition, but I just wondered, ______________, if I did, what role would I get? I look at the casting call, I'm going down the categories, and I _____ at the top: the A girls. The casting call reads: "These are the hottest of the hottest, ______, must have real hair, no extensions." Well, since I have 20 ______ of Brazilian hair extensions on my head, doesn't quite apply to me. But that's fine. I go to the next category: the B girls. The casting call reads: "These are fine girls, long natural hair, must have light skin, Beyoncé's the _________ hit here." Light skin? Also not me. And might I add: not even _______ made the cut to be an A girl. But that's fine. (Laughter) I go to the next category: the C girls. The _______ call reads: "These are African American _____, can have extensions, must be medium to light skin toned." Now, maybe back when I lived in Boston, in the ______ of the winter can I get away with being "medium skin toned," but since I've come back to sunny California where I spend all my free time baking in the sun, not so much. So I scroll all the way down to the last category: the D girls. The casting call reads: "These are _______ American girls, poor, not in good shape, must have a darker skin tone." A darker skin tone. Well, I _____ that's me: a D girl. When I first read this, I felt betrayed. Any given year, there are just a handful of movies starring _____ actors and actresses, just a handful of _____________ when people can see actresses that look like me, on the big screen, and see that we are fierce and beautiful and desirable. So I felt ________. Not even in these small circles I'm allowed to feel beautiful? I felt ______ aside for those of more "favorable" features: light skin, light eyes, long, soft real hair. But the more I thought about it, the more the feeling of betrayal slipped away for the more familiar feeling of "that's just the way it is" because in my world, this phenomenon is all too familiar. Something just as sinister and subtle as racism: Colorism, the discrimination of those with a darker skin tone, typically among ___________ within the same racial or ethnic _____. The _____ of colorism in the US ______ with _______. The mass rape of African slave females by white male slave masters gave birth to a cohort of mixed-race slave children. These mixed-race slaves are related to the slave masters and had more _____ features, and were given preferential _________ and _______ to work inside the house, doing less strenuous work, as opposed to the darker skinned slaves that had to work out in the fields, doing more laborious work. Even after slavery was abolished, ______ still gave more preferential treatment to ______ that had more Anglo-type features, giving them better ______ to jobs, _______ and education. The thing is, though, even within the black community, black people used skin tone and facial features to discriminate against each other. They would only allow entrance into sororities, ____________ or elite social _____ to blacks that were able to display Anglo-type ________. They'd go through a series of tests to see if you fit the bill. One well-known test was the "brown paper bag" test. Where if you were lighter than a _____ paper bag, you're in! But if you were darker than a brown paper bag, you're out. Another well-known test was the pencil test, where they would take a pencil and run it through your hair to make sure that it's straight enough so the pencil wouldn't get stuck. The last test was ______ the shadow test, where they would take a flashlight and shine it against your profile and look at the shadow that your _______ made against the wall. And if it matched that of a white person's profile, you're fine. But if it didn't, you're out. Now, though these practices are no longer in effect today, the effects of them are still very much so present. I remember a common "compliment" I would often get in middle and high ______, often told to me by other black males; it went to the effect of: "Oh! You're so pretty for a dark _______ girl." And it doesn't help that the media continues to place a premium on lighter skin by retouching and photoshopping the skin of _________ of color before putting them on the cover of magazines, as can be seen here, here, here and even here. Now, colorism is not just isolated to the US, its _______ are ______, as best illustrated by the skin-lightening and skin-bleaching creams all over the world. In India and Asia alone, skin lightening and skin _________ is a multi-billion dollar business. Despite the harmful toxins that are _______ in these products, people are still willing to take the risk and use them in order to achieve what they are led to believe is beautiful. And beauty products have flocked on this insight. One known brand, "Vaseline," even partnered with Facebook to come up with an app that would lighten the skin of you profile picture in order to promote their skin-lightening cream. And you can't travel throughout Asia without being inundated by advertising and ___________ that _______ happiness and _______ if you could just be a little bit lighter. (Laughter) _______ have shown that these ________ that we see at a young age have a ________ effect on us. In 2010, CNN did a study where they interviewed young children, just five, six, seven years old, and _____ them to _____ values and attributes to ______ based on their skin tone. Here's a clip from that _____. (Video starts) Interviewer: And why is she the smart child? Girl: Because she is _____. Interviewer: OK. Show me the dumb child. And why is she the dumb child? Girl: Because she's black. Interviewer: Well, show me the ugly child. And why is she the ugly child? Girl: Because she's black. Interviewer: Show me the good-looking child. And why is she the good-looking child? Girl: Because she's light-skinned. _____ Okoro: These messages that we see at such a young age and these messages that we internalize, they stay with us. They stayed with me. And though I denied it and _______ it out and I say I'm strong, I'm _____, I'm accomplished, I'm beautiful, I'm here at Stanford and I'm not a D girl, this stuff, these messages, they stayed with me. And they manifest in this voice that makes me question, makes me doubt and makes me think: "But wait ..." "Am I a D girl?" It stays with me. And so now, whenever someone gives me __________ or says, "Oh! You look nice, you look pretty," the voice _____ in the rest of the sentence with: "for a dark skinned girl." It stays with me. And it makes me question my intentions because even though I say that I have these extensions just for fun and that I like them, that _____ says "No!" "You got them because you're trying to _____ a beauty standard you can actually never obtain." It _____ with me. Even as I go to send a simple text message, that voice in my head tells me that I should be embarrassed or ashamed when I ______ all the way to the end, to the last, darkest emoji. It stays with me. But I don't want it to stay with me. And the good thing is it doesn't have to. Because these beauty preferences that we have, they're not something we are born with, they're _______. And if they're learned, they can be _________. Among us are CEOs and co-founders, directors of marketing, you all are the arbiters of what society _________ beautiful by deciding who you _____ to put in your advertising or who you chose to be the face of you brand. So you have the opportunity to make the unconventional choice. And those of us that consume these messages, we play our role too. Because the first step to change is _________. And now everyone in this room is a little more _____ and will see the world just a little bit differently. And you don't have to passively accept what _______ tells us to think is beautiful. We can question it, and we can challenge the status quo. Because when we do, we get one step closer to broadening the ________ of beauty and ________ a society where the world can see that D girls are beautiful too. Thank you. (Applause) (Cheers)

Solution

  1. models
  2. start
  3. stays
  4. whites
  5. profile
  6. black
  7. beyoncé
  8. scroll
  9. learned
  10. studies
  11. housing
  12. anglo
  13. middle
  14. guess
  15. hypothetically
  16. theaters
  17. blacks
  18. group
  19. prototype
  20. bleaching
  21. access
  22. betrayed
  23. society
  24. compliment
  25. fills
  26. chose
  27. asked
  28. present
  29. smart
  30. begins
  31. excited
  32. blocked
  33. messages
  34. school
  35. success
  36. white
  37. actresses
  38. treatment
  39. girls
  40. awareness
  41. promise
  42. place
  43. called
  44. commercials
  45. actress
  46. voice
  47. creating
  48. features
  49. reach
  50. casting
  51. shoved
  52. considers
  53. profound
  54. cruising
  55. global
  56. standard
  57. slavery
  58. people
  59. effects
  60. story
  61. brown
  62. movie
  63. skinned
  64. opportunities
  65. individuals
  66. fraternities
  67. inches
  68. chika
  69. african
  70. clubs
  71. allowed
  72. study
  73. unlearned
  74. aware

Original Text

The movie "Straight Outta Compton" comes out. I'm so excited. I'm from LA, so this movie is particularly close to my heart. I saw it in theaters three times. So I'm cruising the Internet devouring everything I can about this movie. I come across the casting call. This movie has already come out and I'm no actress, so I wouldn't actually audition, but I just wondered, hypothetically, if I did, what role would I get? I look at the casting call, I'm going down the categories, and I start at the top: the A girls. The casting call reads: "These are the hottest of the hottest, models, must have real hair, no extensions." Well, since I have 20 inches of Brazilian hair extensions on my head, doesn't quite apply to me. But that's fine. I go to the next category: the B girls. The casting call reads: "These are fine girls, long natural hair, must have light skin, Beyoncé's the prototype hit here." Light skin? Also not me. And might I add: not even Beyoncé made the cut to be an A girl. But that's fine. (Laughter) I go to the next category: the C girls. The casting call reads: "These are African American girls, can have extensions, must be medium to light skin toned." Now, maybe back when I lived in Boston, in the middle of the winter can I get away with being "medium skin toned," but since I've come back to sunny California where I spend all my free time baking in the sun, not so much. So I scroll all the way down to the last category: the D girls. The casting call reads: "These are African American girls, poor, not in good shape, must have a darker skin tone." A darker skin tone. Well, I guess that's me: a D girl. When I first read this, I felt betrayed. Any given year, there are just a handful of movies starring black actors and actresses, just a handful of opportunities when people can see actresses that look like me, on the big screen, and see that we are fierce and beautiful and desirable. So I felt betrayed. Not even in these small circles I'm allowed to feel beautiful? I felt shoved aside for those of more "favorable" features: light skin, light eyes, long, soft real hair. But the more I thought about it, the more the feeling of betrayal slipped away for the more familiar feeling of "that's just the way it is" because in my world, this phenomenon is all too familiar. Something just as sinister and subtle as racism: Colorism, the discrimination of those with a darker skin tone, typically among individuals within the same racial or ethnic group. The story of colorism in the US begins with slavery. The mass rape of African slave females by white male slave masters gave birth to a cohort of mixed-race slave children. These mixed-race slaves are related to the slave masters and had more Anglo features, and were given preferential treatment and allowed to work inside the house, doing less strenuous work, as opposed to the darker skinned slaves that had to work out in the fields, doing more laborious work. Even after slavery was abolished, whites still gave more preferential treatment to blacks that had more Anglo-type features, giving them better access to jobs, housing and education. The thing is, though, even within the black community, black people used skin tone and facial features to discriminate against each other. They would only allow entrance into sororities, fraternities or elite social clubs to blacks that were able to display Anglo-type features. They'd go through a series of tests to see if you fit the bill. One well-known test was the "brown paper bag" test. Where if you were lighter than a brown paper bag, you're in! But if you were darker than a brown paper bag, you're out. Another well-known test was the pencil test, where they would take a pencil and run it through your hair to make sure that it's straight enough so the pencil wouldn't get stuck. The last test was called the shadow test, where they would take a flashlight and shine it against your profile and look at the shadow that your profile made against the wall. And if it matched that of a white person's profile, you're fine. But if it didn't, you're out. Now, though these practices are no longer in effect today, the effects of them are still very much so present. I remember a common "compliment" I would often get in middle and high school, often told to me by other black males; it went to the effect of: "Oh! You're so pretty for a dark skinned girl." And it doesn't help that the media continues to place a premium on lighter skin by retouching and photoshopping the skin of actresses of color before putting them on the cover of magazines, as can be seen here, here, here and even here. Now, colorism is not just isolated to the US, its effects are global, as best illustrated by the skin-lightening and skin-bleaching creams all over the world. In India and Asia alone, skin lightening and skin bleaching is a multi-billion dollar business. Despite the harmful toxins that are present in these products, people are still willing to take the risk and use them in order to achieve what they are led to believe is beautiful. And beauty products have flocked on this insight. One known brand, "Vaseline," even partnered with Facebook to come up with an app that would lighten the skin of you profile picture in order to promote their skin-lightening cream. And you can't travel throughout Asia without being inundated by advertising and commercials that promise happiness and success if you could just be a little bit lighter. (Laughter) Studies have shown that these messages that we see at a young age have a profound effect on us. In 2010, CNN did a study where they interviewed young children, just five, six, seven years old, and asked them to place values and attributes to people based on their skin tone. Here's a clip from that study. (Video starts) Interviewer: And why is she the smart child? Girl: Because she is white. Interviewer: OK. Show me the dumb child. And why is she the dumb child? Girl: Because she's black. Interviewer: Well, show me the ugly child. And why is she the ugly child? Girl: Because she's black. Interviewer: Show me the good-looking child. And why is she the good-looking child? Girl: Because she's light-skinned. Chika Okoro: These messages that we see at such a young age and these messages that we internalize, they stay with us. They stayed with me. And though I denied it and blocked it out and I say I'm strong, I'm smart, I'm accomplished, I'm beautiful, I'm here at Stanford and I'm not a D girl, this stuff, these messages, they stayed with me. And they manifest in this voice that makes me question, makes me doubt and makes me think: "But wait ..." "Am I a D girl?" It stays with me. And so now, whenever someone gives me compliment or says, "Oh! You look nice, you look pretty," the voice fills in the rest of the sentence with: "for a dark skinned girl." It stays with me. And it makes me question my intentions because even though I say that I have these extensions just for fun and that I like them, that voice says "No!" "You got them because you're trying to reach a beauty standard you can actually never obtain." It stays with me. Even as I go to send a simple text message, that voice in my head tells me that I should be embarrassed or ashamed when I scroll all the way to the end, to the last, darkest emoji. It stays with me. But I don't want it to stay with me. And the good thing is it doesn't have to. Because these beauty preferences that we have, they're not something we are born with, they're learned. And if they're learned, they can be unlearned. Among us are CEOs and co-founders, directors of marketing, you all are the arbiters of what society considers beautiful by deciding who you chose to put in your advertising or who you chose to be the face of you brand. So you have the opportunity to make the unconventional choice. And those of us that consume these messages, we play our role too. Because the first step to change is awareness. And now everyone in this room is a little more aware and will see the world just a little bit differently. And you don't have to passively accept what society tells us to think is beautiful. We can question it, and we can challenge the status quo. Because when we do, we get one step closer to broadening the standard of beauty and creating a society where the world can see that D girls are beautiful too. Thank you. (Applause) (Cheers)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
casting call 5
darker skin 3
skin tone 3
african american 2
felt betrayed 2
slave masters 2
preferential treatment 2
brown paper 2
dark skinned 2
young age 2

Important Words

  1. abolished
  2. accept
  3. access
  4. accomplished
  5. achieve
  6. actors
  7. actress
  8. actresses
  9. advertising
  10. african
  11. age
  12. allowed
  13. american
  14. anglo
  15. app
  16. applause
  17. apply
  18. arbiters
  19. ashamed
  20. asia
  21. asked
  22. attributes
  23. audition
  24. aware
  25. awareness
  26. bag
  27. baking
  28. based
  29. beautiful
  30. beauty
  31. begins
  32. betrayal
  33. betrayed
  34. beyoncé
  35. big
  36. bill
  37. birth
  38. bit
  39. black
  40. blacks
  41. bleaching
  42. blocked
  43. born
  44. boston
  45. brand
  46. brazilian
  47. broadening
  48. brown
  49. business
  50. california
  51. call
  52. called
  53. casting
  54. categories
  55. ceos
  56. challenge
  57. change
  58. cheers
  59. chika
  60. child
  61. children
  62. choice
  63. chose
  64. circles
  65. clip
  66. close
  67. closer
  68. clubs
  69. cnn
  70. cohort
  71. color
  72. colorism
  73. commercials
  74. common
  75. community
  76. compliment
  77. considers
  78. consume
  79. continues
  80. cover
  81. cream
  82. creams
  83. creating
  84. cruising
  85. cut
  86. dark
  87. darker
  88. darkest
  89. deciding
  90. denied
  91. desirable
  92. devouring
  93. differently
  94. directors
  95. discriminate
  96. discrimination
  97. display
  98. dollar
  99. doubt
  100. dumb
  101. education
  102. effect
  103. effects
  104. elite
  105. embarrassed
  106. emoji
  107. entrance
  108. ethnic
  109. excited
  110. extensions
  111. eyes
  112. face
  113. facebook
  114. facial
  115. familiar
  116. features
  117. feel
  118. feeling
  119. felt
  120. females
  121. fields
  122. fierce
  123. fills
  124. fine
  125. fit
  126. flashlight
  127. flocked
  128. fraternities
  129. free
  130. fun
  131. gave
  132. girl
  133. girls
  134. giving
  135. global
  136. good
  137. group
  138. guess
  139. hair
  140. handful
  141. happiness
  142. harmful
  143. head
  144. heart
  145. high
  146. hit
  147. hottest
  148. house
  149. housing
  150. hypothetically
  151. illustrated
  152. inches
  153. india
  154. individuals
  155. insight
  156. intentions
  157. internalize
  158. internet
  159. interviewed
  160. inundated
  161. isolated
  162. jobs
  163. la
  164. laborious
  165. laughter
  166. learned
  167. led
  168. light
  169. lighten
  170. lightening
  171. lighter
  172. lived
  173. long
  174. longer
  175. magazines
  176. male
  177. manifest
  178. marketing
  179. mass
  180. masters
  181. matched
  182. media
  183. medium
  184. message
  185. messages
  186. middle
  187. models
  188. movie
  189. movies
  190. natural
  191. nice
  192. obtain
  193. opportunities
  194. opportunity
  195. opposed
  196. order
  197. outta
  198. paper
  199. partnered
  200. passively
  201. pencil
  202. people
  203. phenomenon
  204. photoshopping
  205. picture
  206. place
  207. play
  208. poor
  209. practices
  210. preferences
  211. preferential
  212. premium
  213. present
  214. pretty
  215. products
  216. profile
  217. profound
  218. promise
  219. promote
  220. prototype
  221. put
  222. putting
  223. question
  224. quo
  225. racial
  226. rape
  227. reach
  228. read
  229. real
  230. related
  231. remember
  232. rest
  233. retouching
  234. risk
  235. role
  236. room
  237. run
  238. school
  239. screen
  240. scroll
  241. send
  242. sentence
  243. series
  244. shadow
  245. shape
  246. shine
  247. shoved
  248. show
  249. shown
  250. simple
  251. sinister
  252. skin
  253. skinned
  254. slave
  255. slavery
  256. slaves
  257. slipped
  258. small
  259. smart
  260. social
  261. society
  262. soft
  263. sororities
  264. spend
  265. standard
  266. stanford
  267. starring
  268. start
  269. starts
  270. status
  271. stay
  272. stayed
  273. stays
  274. step
  275. story
  276. straight
  277. strenuous
  278. strong
  279. stuck
  280. studies
  281. study
  282. stuff
  283. subtle
  284. success
  285. sun
  286. sunny
  287. tells
  288. test
  289. tests
  290. text
  291. theaters
  292. thought
  293. time
  294. times
  295. today
  296. told
  297. tone
  298. toned
  299. toxins
  300. travel
  301. treatment
  302. typically
  303. ugly
  304. unconventional
  305. unlearned
  306. values
  307. video
  308. voice
  309. wait
  310. wall
  311. white
  312. whites
  313. winter
  314. wondered
  315. work
  316. world
  317. year
  318. years
  319. young