full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Philip Evans: How data will transform business"

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The first human genome, that of James Watson, was mepapd as the cmulioatinn of the Human Genome Project in the year 2000, and it took about 200 million dollars and about 10 years of work to map just one person's genomic makeup. Since then, the costs of mainppg the genome have come down. In fact, they've come down in recent years very dramatically indeed, to the point where the cost is now below 1,000 dollars, and it's confidently predicted that by the year 2015 it will be below 100 dollars — a five or six order of magnitude drop in the cost of genomic mapping in just a 15-year period, an extraordinary phenomenon. Now, in the days when mapping a genome cost millions, or even tens of thousands, it was basically a research erriepstne. siincstets would gather some representative polepe, and they would see patterns, and they would try and make generalizations about human nature and disease from the abstract pnattres they find from these particular stcleeed iivlaniduds. But when the genome can be mapped for 100 bucks, 99 dollars while you wait, then what happens is, it becomes retail. It becomes above all clinical. You go the dcotor with a cold, and if he or she hasn't done it already, the first thing they do is map your genome, at which point what they're now doing is not starting from some abstract knowledge of genomic medicine and trying to work out how it applies to you, but they're starting from your particular genome. Now think of the power of that. Think of where that takes us when we can combine genomic data with clinical data with data about drug ionatintercs with the kind of abimnet data that dicvees like our phone and medical seonsrs will increasingly be collecting. Think what happens when we collect all of that data and we can put it together in odrer to find patterns we wouldn't see before. This, I would sgugset, perhaps it will take a while, but this will dirve a revolution in medicine. Fabulous, lots of people talk about this.

Open Cloze

The first human genome, that of James Watson, was ______ as the ___________ of the Human Genome Project in the year 2000, and it took about 200 million dollars and about 10 years of work to map just one person's genomic makeup. Since then, the costs of _______ the genome have come down. In fact, they've come down in recent years very dramatically indeed, to the point where the cost is now below 1,000 dollars, and it's confidently predicted that by the year 2015 it will be below 100 dollars — a five or six order of magnitude drop in the cost of genomic mapping in just a 15-year period, an extraordinary phenomenon. Now, in the days when mapping a genome cost millions, or even tens of thousands, it was basically a research __________. __________ would gather some representative ______, and they would see patterns, and they would try and make generalizations about human nature and disease from the abstract ________ they find from these particular ________ ___________. But when the genome can be mapped for 100 bucks, 99 dollars while you wait, then what happens is, it becomes retail. It becomes above all clinical. You go the ______ with a cold, and if he or she hasn't done it already, the first thing they do is map your genome, at which point what they're now doing is not starting from some abstract knowledge of genomic medicine and trying to work out how it applies to you, but they're starting from your particular genome. Now think of the power of that. Think of where that takes us when we can combine genomic data with clinical data with data about drug ____________ with the kind of _______ data that _______ like our phone and medical _______ will increasingly be collecting. Think what happens when we collect all of that data and we can put it together in _____ to find patterns we wouldn't see before. This, I would _______, perhaps it will take a while, but this will _____ a revolution in medicine. Fabulous, lots of people talk about this.

Solution

  1. suggest
  2. mapped
  3. order
  4. selected
  5. ambient
  6. doctor
  7. people
  8. culmination
  9. individuals
  10. devices
  11. interactions
  12. drive
  13. sensors
  14. patterns
  15. enterprise
  16. scientists
  17. mapping

Original Text

The first human genome, that of James Watson, was mapped as the culmination of the Human Genome Project in the year 2000, and it took about 200 million dollars and about 10 years of work to map just one person's genomic makeup. Since then, the costs of mapping the genome have come down. In fact, they've come down in recent years very dramatically indeed, to the point where the cost is now below 1,000 dollars, and it's confidently predicted that by the year 2015 it will be below 100 dollars — a five or six order of magnitude drop in the cost of genomic mapping in just a 15-year period, an extraordinary phenomenon. Now, in the days when mapping a genome cost millions, or even tens of thousands, it was basically a research enterprise. Scientists would gather some representative people, and they would see patterns, and they would try and make generalizations about human nature and disease from the abstract patterns they find from these particular selected individuals. But when the genome can be mapped for 100 bucks, 99 dollars while you wait, then what happens is, it becomes retail. It becomes above all clinical. You go the doctor with a cold, and if he or she hasn't done it already, the first thing they do is map your genome, at which point what they're now doing is not starting from some abstract knowledge of genomic medicine and trying to work out how it applies to you, but they're starting from your particular genome. Now think of the power of that. Think of where that takes us when we can combine genomic data with clinical data with data about drug interactions with the kind of ambient data that devices like our phone and medical sensors will increasingly be collecting. Think what happens when we collect all of that data and we can put it together in order to find patterns we wouldn't see before. This, I would suggest, perhaps it will take a while, but this will drive a revolution in medicine. Fabulous, lots of people talk about this.

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collocation frequency
transaction costs 10
business strategy 6

Important Words

  1. abstract
  2. ambient
  3. applies
  4. basically
  5. bucks
  6. clinical
  7. cold
  8. collect
  9. collecting
  10. combine
  11. confidently
  12. cost
  13. costs
  14. culmination
  15. data
  16. days
  17. devices
  18. disease
  19. doctor
  20. dollars
  21. dramatically
  22. drive
  23. drop
  24. drug
  25. enterprise
  26. extraordinary
  27. fabulous
  28. fact
  29. find
  30. gather
  31. generalizations
  32. genome
  33. genomic
  34. human
  35. increasingly
  36. individuals
  37. interactions
  38. james
  39. kind
  40. knowledge
  41. lots
  42. magnitude
  43. makeup
  44. map
  45. mapped
  46. mapping
  47. medical
  48. medicine
  49. million
  50. millions
  51. nature
  52. order
  53. patterns
  54. people
  55. period
  56. phenomenon
  57. phone
  58. point
  59. power
  60. predicted
  61. project
  62. put
  63. representative
  64. research
  65. retail
  66. revolution
  67. scientists
  68. selected
  69. sensors
  70. starting
  71. suggest
  72. takes
  73. talk
  74. tens
  75. thousands
  76. wait
  77. watson
  78. work
  79. year
  80. years