full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Megan Parker: How dogs help with conservation efforts

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Thank you. I'm here to talk about dogs, but more scialpeilfcy, I'm here to talk about bad dogs, and why I love them. I'm a conservation bioosligt, meaning I study weird sicpees and try to count them. And I'm also a tainerr of detection dogs, and where those two wdrlos meet is where I live, and where I work. Most of the dogs that we get for this kind of work, we scour shelters for because these are bad dogs, and they don't make great pets. And you know these dogs. You go to your friend's barbecue, and that dog comes up, and she is so happy to see you she pees on your feet, and she drops this big, slabbery ball in your lap, and you just tohrw it to try to get as much distance between yourself and this dog as possible, and it comes back, and then by 950th throw you're just tiniknhg, "Oh, just why didn't they get rid of this dog?" And often they do. They end up in srhteels because they often have this overwhelming desire to binrg you things. (Laughter) They think that you're really enjyniog this. The dog is so happy, thinking that you're all enjoying this game because you're tihrwnog something and it's bringing it to you. And they're tilnelg you where this thing is, and that's what we've asked them to do over the etovouiln of time, our companionship with dogs, we've aeksd them to bring us stuff. And they do a great job. They bring us our lietcovsk, and they bring us food and game, and this is the only species on the planet that can be bothered to bring us stuff and bothered to tell us what they know. I mean you can ask a camel or a bear, or you can ask your cat, and you get nothing. (Laughter) But dogs love telling you what they know. And the ones that really really really love this, they are over the top, they have this unbelievable energy, just unrelenting go and dirve. And we categorize that often as just a recejt dog. It is just too much, it's destructive, it's all of these things. But those are the characteristics I like to work with in dogs. Inability to quit: it's not even a desire, it's an inability to quit, It's what resilience is. For a dog that doesn't stop, you can train that dog to do lots of things and bring you information. I'd like to tell you a little bit about this particular dog, his name is Ruger. And he's a really bad dog. He is the first anti-poaching dog in Zambia, lives right next to a national park where animals are being poached and snared and trafficked out of the park, and even, you know, eheanlpt iorvy from the Congo Basin is moving through Tanzania and through Zambia out to prtos to be shipped abroad. And this dog is trained to find ivory and rhino horn, bush meat, other wild life contraband and guns and aomiimtnun. I trained him, and I found him to be a hrrbloie dog. He bit and saeppnd at people, he was scary to approach, he was everything you fear in a dog, and it turns out he was going blind. So I take this dog to Zambia, and I pair him with these scouts who don't have any history of having pets or being with dogs except throwing rokcs at vilglae dogs. And they learned to think of this dog as a colleague. And after four months of intensive training with dogs, they started setting up roadblocks and looking for illegal contraband being trafficked in vehicles along the rdaos outside this park. And they checked vehicles, and by a human doing it, it can take hrous, especially for a bus loaded with luggage and food, like this one up in the top corner. And Ruger just chckeed it in a few minutes as this is their first practice training on a roadblock. And he alerted, which maens he sat, and he stared at his handler, and the handler was like, "Oh, dear!" They searched it, looked through it, and they found nothing, and so their sirptis dropped. But they unloaded that mainivn, and they have luggage out, and again Ruger picked a piece of luaggge and he sat, and they searched through it and found nothing. And Ruger insisted, and they went back, and then Ruger hit on a tiny matchbox wrapped in a plastic bag inside clothes. And inside that matchbox was a primer cap, which is an illegal firing pin for a haadndme rifle. And so everyone, all the passengers on that bus, all the scouts, they suddenly believed. They believed that reugr knew what he was doing because he didn't quit. He has an even more interesting backstory. He came off of an inidan reservation, the beaelckft Reservation in Montana. And he was a horrible puppy, and the oenwr of this litter shot all of the dogs. Somehow Ruger escaped, he edend up in a shelter in Helena. Someone found him and noticed how bad he was and brought him to us to be trained as a conservation dttioceen dog. He has made a huge difference. Because of his uinerenntlg energy and desire to work and love of work, he brings us amazing information. Then there is another dog I'd like you to meet. His name is peipn, and he is with our executive, Dr. Pete coolpllipo, who is going to tell you a little bit more, and I'm going to work Pepin for you. PC: Well, Megan, Pepin get ready. I'll give you a little uatdpe on Ruger. The four mhnots after he made his first find in the mibuins, he dteeetcd and the scouts he wkors with confiscated 15 guns. Mostly homemade muzzleloaders, which are their gun of preference for elephant poaching. They're also used because guns are hard to come by in Africa, by sometimes seven, sometimes 10, sometimes more different poachers. So, as of now, there may be 100-150 different poachers who are out of business thanks to Ruger. (Applause) (Cheers) And for these exceptional, really high-drive dogs, you know, Ruger is really the rule rather than the exception. And I'll tell you about a clpuoe more. This is Seamus. Seamus is tearnid to dcetet dyer’s woad, which is the weed that's in that pot there. And siekapng of riecneilse, dyer’s woad drops between 12,000 and 15,000 sedes a year. So it's a nooxius weed, and when it gets established, it's very hard to get rid of. So people were working on getting rid of it on Mount Sentinel in Missoula for about 10 years, and they weren't making any progress. So in 2011, we bguorht in Seamus. And smuaes is able to do something that we human searchers can't, which is find it by smell before it flowers. Seamus has knocked back dyer’s woad by over 95 pncreet. Thanks to him, we're going to do something that was unthinkable just a few years ago, which is eradicate a noxious weed, a bad ioaeifstntn of a noxious weed. And this is Wicket. Wicket is one of the best stories. She was in a shelter in Anaconda, Montana, and when we came to get her, the director of the shelter said, "You don't want that dog. That dog is crazy." (Laughter) And now Aimee famously said, "I think she might be the right kind of crazy." Wicket is now the most accomplished conservation detection dog in the world. She's worked on three continents, she's worked in doezns of US states, and here she is searching a boat for zebra mussels which have a microscopic lvaarl stage that we can't see. Speaking of aheopclcimsd and cazry, (lhteguar) now you guys will get to wacth Pepin do his thing. So Meg's put his vest on. That is his siganl that it's time to work. You can see he's low-focused. (Laughter) He is ready to go. So I hid ivory. I hid some ivory in the room. Pepin is one of the ivory dogs, and I hid some ivory in the room. You, guys, just stay put. He's also not trained on narcotics, so no one has to make a run, (Laughter) for the door or anything like that, and when Meg tells him to go, he'll do his thing. So what you're going to see is you're going to see him work, and you can watch his head, he'll move his head up and down, it's a little hard indoors because there's not much air moving around in here. But he'll search, and you may see him whip around, change directions, his alert is something we call "passive alert." He sits. And the reason he does that is because we have him trained not to diustrb the samples. Sometimes it's a crime scene, so they want to collect edivecne. Sometimes we collect scats for DNA or things like that. Normally, he works in big open places. He is trained on grizzly bear, he is trained on wolverine, so he runs on big, high mdawoes and pastures, but he's also trained on containers, vehicles and buildings. And he's checking there. You see he's got scent now. There he goes. Good job, pal! That's his alert. And she has a command that is, "Show me!" And he'll show where it is. So that's a broken ivory tusk. (Applause) Well done. Thank you! (Applause)

Open Cloze

Thank you. I'm here to talk about dogs, but more ____________, I'm here to talk about bad dogs, and why I love them. I'm a conservation _________, meaning I study weird _______ and try to count them. And I'm also a _______ of detection dogs, and where those two ______ meet is where I live, and where I work. Most of the dogs that we get for this kind of work, we scour shelters for because these are bad dogs, and they don't make great pets. And you know these dogs. You go to your friend's barbecue, and that dog comes up, and she is so happy to see you she pees on your feet, and she drops this big, slabbery ball in your lap, and you just _____ it to try to get as much distance between yourself and this dog as possible, and it comes back, and then by 950th throw you're just ________, "Oh, just why didn't they get rid of this dog?" And often they do. They end up in ________ because they often have this overwhelming desire to _____ you things. (Laughter) They think that you're really ________ this. The dog is so happy, thinking that you're all enjoying this game because you're ________ something and it's bringing it to you. And they're _______ you where this thing is, and that's what we've asked them to do over the _________ of time, our companionship with dogs, we've _____ them to bring us stuff. And they do a great job. They bring us our _________, and they bring us food and game, and this is the only species on the planet that can be bothered to bring us stuff and bothered to tell us what they know. I mean you can ask a camel or a bear, or you can ask your cat, and you get nothing. (Laughter) But dogs love telling you what they know. And the ones that really really really love this, they are over the top, they have this unbelievable energy, just unrelenting go and _____. And we categorize that often as just a ______ dog. It is just too much, it's destructive, it's all of these things. But those are the characteristics I like to work with in dogs. Inability to quit: it's not even a desire, it's an inability to quit, It's what resilience is. For a dog that doesn't stop, you can train that dog to do lots of things and bring you information. I'd like to tell you a little bit about this particular dog, his name is Ruger. And he's a really bad dog. He is the first anti-poaching dog in Zambia, lives right next to a national park where animals are being poached and snared and trafficked out of the park, and even, you know, ________ _____ from the Congo Basin is moving through Tanzania and through Zambia out to _____ to be shipped abroad. And this dog is trained to find ivory and rhino horn, bush meat, other wild life contraband and guns and __________. I trained him, and I found him to be a ________ dog. He bit and _______ at people, he was scary to approach, he was everything you fear in a dog, and it turns out he was going blind. So I take this dog to Zambia, and I pair him with these scouts who don't have any history of having pets or being with dogs except throwing _____ at _______ dogs. And they learned to think of this dog as a colleague. And after four months of intensive training with dogs, they started setting up roadblocks and looking for illegal contraband being trafficked in vehicles along the _____ outside this park. And they checked vehicles, and by a human doing it, it can take _____, especially for a bus loaded with luggage and food, like this one up in the top corner. And Ruger just _______ it in a few minutes as this is their first practice training on a roadblock. And he alerted, which _____ he sat, and he stared at his handler, and the handler was like, "Oh, dear!" They searched it, looked through it, and they found nothing, and so their _______ dropped. But they unloaded that _______, and they have luggage out, and again Ruger picked a piece of _______ and he sat, and they searched through it and found nothing. And Ruger insisted, and they went back, and then Ruger hit on a tiny matchbox wrapped in a plastic bag inside clothes. And inside that matchbox was a primer cap, which is an illegal firing pin for a ________ rifle. And so everyone, all the passengers on that bus, all the scouts, they suddenly believed. They believed that _____ knew what he was doing because he didn't quit. He has an even more interesting backstory. He came off of an ______ reservation, the _________ Reservation in Montana. And he was a horrible puppy, and the _____ of this litter shot all of the dogs. Somehow Ruger escaped, he _____ up in a shelter in Helena. Someone found him and noticed how bad he was and brought him to us to be trained as a conservation _________ dog. He has made a huge difference. Because of his ___________ energy and desire to work and love of work, he brings us amazing information. Then there is another dog I'd like you to meet. His name is _____, and he is with our executive, Dr. Pete __________, who is going to tell you a little bit more, and I'm going to work Pepin for you. PC: Well, Megan, Pepin get ready. I'll give you a little ______ on Ruger. The four ______ after he made his first find in the _______, he ________ and the scouts he _____ with confiscated 15 guns. Mostly homemade muzzleloaders, which are their gun of preference for elephant poaching. They're also used because guns are hard to come by in Africa, by sometimes seven, sometimes 10, sometimes more different poachers. So, as of now, there may be 100-150 different poachers who are out of business thanks to Ruger. (Applause) (Cheers) And for these exceptional, really high-drive dogs, you know, Ruger is really the rule rather than the exception. And I'll tell you about a ______ more. This is Seamus. Seamus is _______ to ______ dyer’s woad, which is the weed that's in that pot there. And ________ of __________, dyer’s woad drops between 12,000 and 15,000 _____ a year. So it's a _______ weed, and when it gets established, it's very hard to get rid of. So people were working on getting rid of it on Mount Sentinel in Missoula for about 10 years, and they weren't making any progress. So in 2011, we _______ in Seamus. And ______ is able to do something that we human searchers can't, which is find it by smell before it flowers. Seamus has knocked back dyer’s woad by over 95 _______. Thanks to him, we're going to do something that was unthinkable just a few years ago, which is eradicate a noxious weed, a bad ___________ of a noxious weed. And this is Wicket. Wicket is one of the best stories. She was in a shelter in Anaconda, Montana, and when we came to get her, the director of the shelter said, "You don't want that dog. That dog is crazy." (Laughter) And now Aimee famously said, "I think she might be the right kind of crazy." Wicket is now the most accomplished conservation detection dog in the world. She's worked on three continents, she's worked in ______ of US states, and here she is searching a boat for zebra mussels which have a microscopic ______ stage that we can't see. Speaking of ____________ and _____, (________) now you guys will get to _____ Pepin do his thing. So Meg's put his vest on. That is his ______ that it's time to work. You can see he's low-focused. (Laughter) He is ready to go. So I hid ivory. I hid some ivory in the room. Pepin is one of the ivory dogs, and I hid some ivory in the room. You, guys, just stay put. He's also not trained on narcotics, so no one has to make a run, (Laughter) for the door or anything like that, and when Meg tells him to go, he'll do his thing. So what you're going to see is you're going to see him work, and you can watch his head, he'll move his head up and down, it's a little hard indoors because there's not much air moving around in here. But he'll search, and you may see him whip around, change directions, his alert is something we call "passive alert." He sits. And the reason he does that is because we have him trained not to _______ the samples. Sometimes it's a crime scene, so they want to collect ________. Sometimes we collect scats for DNA or things like that. Normally, he works in big open places. He is trained on grizzly bear, he is trained on wolverine, so he runs on big, high _______ and pastures, but he's also trained on containers, vehicles and buildings. And he's checking there. You see he's got scent now. There he goes. Good job, pal! That's his alert. And she has a command that is, "Show me!" And he'll show where it is. So that's a broken ivory tusk. (Applause) Well done. Thank you! (Applause)

Solution

  1. horrible
  2. reject
  3. seamus
  4. thinking
  5. asked
  6. couple
  7. update
  8. evidence
  9. minivan
  10. livestock
  11. biologist
  12. snapped
  13. drive
  14. noxious
  15. signal
  16. evolution
  17. means
  18. minibus
  19. speaking
  20. checked
  21. ammunition
  22. elephant
  23. rocks
  24. roads
  25. crazy
  26. resilience
  27. pepin
  28. bring
  29. trained
  30. blackfeet
  31. specifically
  32. coppolillo
  33. unrelenting
  34. percent
  35. throw
  36. detection
  37. disturb
  38. luggage
  39. larval
  40. ruger
  41. hours
  42. watch
  43. indian
  44. brought
  45. accomplished
  46. works
  47. ivory
  48. enjoying
  49. handmade
  50. trainer
  51. months
  52. seeds
  53. village
  54. dozens
  55. spirits
  56. laughter
  57. meadows
  58. worlds
  59. telling
  60. shelters
  61. infestation
  62. species
  63. detected
  64. detect
  65. ended
  66. owner
  67. throwing
  68. ports

Original Text

Thank you. I'm here to talk about dogs, but more specifically, I'm here to talk about bad dogs, and why I love them. I'm a conservation biologist, meaning I study weird species and try to count them. And I'm also a trainer of detection dogs, and where those two worlds meet is where I live, and where I work. Most of the dogs that we get for this kind of work, we scour shelters for because these are bad dogs, and they don't make great pets. And you know these dogs. You go to your friend's barbecue, and that dog comes up, and she is so happy to see you she pees on your feet, and she drops this big, slabbery ball in your lap, and you just throw it to try to get as much distance between yourself and this dog as possible, and it comes back, and then by 950th throw you're just thinking, "Oh, just why didn't they get rid of this dog?" And often they do. They end up in shelters because they often have this overwhelming desire to bring you things. (Laughter) They think that you're really enjoying this. The dog is so happy, thinking that you're all enjoying this game because you're throwing something and it's bringing it to you. And they're telling you where this thing is, and that's what we've asked them to do over the evolution of time, our companionship with dogs, we've asked them to bring us stuff. And they do a great job. They bring us our livestock, and they bring us food and game, and this is the only species on the planet that can be bothered to bring us stuff and bothered to tell us what they know. I mean you can ask a camel or a bear, or you can ask your cat, and you get nothing. (Laughter) But dogs love telling you what they know. And the ones that really really really love this, they are over the top, they have this unbelievable energy, just unrelenting go and drive. And we categorize that often as just a reject dog. It is just too much, it's destructive, it's all of these things. But those are the characteristics I like to work with in dogs. Inability to quit: it's not even a desire, it's an inability to quit, It's what resilience is. For a dog that doesn't stop, you can train that dog to do lots of things and bring you information. I'd like to tell you a little bit about this particular dog, his name is Ruger. And he's a really bad dog. He is the first anti-poaching dog in Zambia, lives right next to a national park where animals are being poached and snared and trafficked out of the park, and even, you know, elephant ivory from the Congo Basin is moving through Tanzania and through Zambia out to ports to be shipped abroad. And this dog is trained to find ivory and rhino horn, bush meat, other wild life contraband and guns and ammunition. I trained him, and I found him to be a horrible dog. He bit and snapped at people, he was scary to approach, he was everything you fear in a dog, and it turns out he was going blind. So I take this dog to Zambia, and I pair him with these scouts who don't have any history of having pets or being with dogs except throwing rocks at village dogs. And they learned to think of this dog as a colleague. And after four months of intensive training with dogs, they started setting up roadblocks and looking for illegal contraband being trafficked in vehicles along the roads outside this park. And they checked vehicles, and by a human doing it, it can take hours, especially for a bus loaded with luggage and food, like this one up in the top corner. And Ruger just checked it in a few minutes as this is their first practice training on a roadblock. And he alerted, which means he sat, and he stared at his handler, and the handler was like, "Oh, dear!" They searched it, looked through it, and they found nothing, and so their spirits dropped. But they unloaded that minivan, and they have luggage out, and again Ruger picked a piece of luggage and he sat, and they searched through it and found nothing. And Ruger insisted, and they went back, and then Ruger hit on a tiny matchbox wrapped in a plastic bag inside clothes. And inside that matchbox was a primer cap, which is an illegal firing pin for a handmade rifle. And so everyone, all the passengers on that bus, all the scouts, they suddenly believed. They believed that Ruger knew what he was doing because he didn't quit. He has an even more interesting backstory. He came off of an Indian reservation, the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana. And he was a horrible puppy, and the owner of this litter shot all of the dogs. Somehow Ruger escaped, he ended up in a shelter in Helena. Someone found him and noticed how bad he was and brought him to us to be trained as a conservation detection dog. He has made a huge difference. Because of his unrelenting energy and desire to work and love of work, he brings us amazing information. Then there is another dog I'd like you to meet. His name is Pepin, and he is with our executive, Dr. Pete Coppolillo, who is going to tell you a little bit more, and I'm going to work Pepin for you. PC: Well, Megan, Pepin get ready. I'll give you a little update on Ruger. The four months after he made his first find in the minibus, he detected and the scouts he works with confiscated 15 guns. Mostly homemade muzzleloaders, which are their gun of preference for elephant poaching. They're also used because guns are hard to come by in Africa, by sometimes seven, sometimes 10, sometimes more different poachers. So, as of now, there may be 100-150 different poachers who are out of business thanks to Ruger. (Applause) (Cheers) And for these exceptional, really high-drive dogs, you know, Ruger is really the rule rather than the exception. And I'll tell you about a couple more. This is Seamus. Seamus is trained to detect dyer’s woad, which is the weed that's in that pot there. And speaking of resilience, dyer’s woad drops between 12,000 and 15,000 seeds a year. So it's a noxious weed, and when it gets established, it's very hard to get rid of. So people were working on getting rid of it on Mount Sentinel in Missoula for about 10 years, and they weren't making any progress. So in 2011, we brought in Seamus. And Seamus is able to do something that we human searchers can't, which is find it by smell before it flowers. Seamus has knocked back dyer’s woad by over 95 percent. Thanks to him, we're going to do something that was unthinkable just a few years ago, which is eradicate a noxious weed, a bad infestation of a noxious weed. And this is Wicket. Wicket is one of the best stories. She was in a shelter in Anaconda, Montana, and when we came to get her, the director of the shelter said, "You don't want that dog. That dog is crazy." (Laughter) And now Aimee famously said, "I think she might be the right kind of crazy." Wicket is now the most accomplished conservation detection dog in the world. She's worked on three continents, she's worked in dozens of US states, and here she is searching a boat for zebra mussels which have a microscopic larval stage that we can't see. Speaking of accomplished and crazy, (Laughter) now you guys will get to watch Pepin do his thing. So Meg's put his vest on. That is his signal that it's time to work. You can see he's low-focused. (Laughter) He is ready to go. So I hid ivory. I hid some ivory in the room. Pepin is one of the ivory dogs, and I hid some ivory in the room. You, guys, just stay put. He's also not trained on narcotics, so no one has to make a run, (Laughter) for the door or anything like that, and when Meg tells him to go, he'll do his thing. So what you're going to see is you're going to see him work, and you can watch his head, he'll move his head up and down, it's a little hard indoors because there's not much air moving around in here. But he'll search, and you may see him whip around, change directions, his alert is something we call "passive alert." He sits. And the reason he does that is because we have him trained not to disturb the samples. Sometimes it's a crime scene, so they want to collect evidence. Sometimes we collect scats for DNA or things like that. Normally, he works in big open places. He is trained on grizzly bear, he is trained on wolverine, so he runs on big, high meadows and pastures, but he's also trained on containers, vehicles and buildings. And he's checking there. You see he's got scent now. There he goes. Good job, pal! That's his alert. And she has a command that is, "Show me!" And he'll show where it is. So that's a broken ivory tusk. (Applause) Well done. Thank you! (Applause)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
conservation detection 2
detection dog 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
conservation detection dog 2

Important Words

  1. accomplished
  2. africa
  3. aimee
  4. air
  5. alert
  6. alerted
  7. amazing
  8. ammunition
  9. anaconda
  10. animals
  11. applause
  12. approach
  13. asked
  14. backstory
  15. bad
  16. bag
  17. ball
  18. barbecue
  19. basin
  20. bear
  21. believed
  22. big
  23. biologist
  24. bit
  25. blackfeet
  26. blind
  27. boat
  28. bothered
  29. bring
  30. bringing
  31. brings
  32. broken
  33. brought
  34. buildings
  35. bus
  36. bush
  37. business
  38. call
  39. camel
  40. cap
  41. cat
  42. categorize
  43. change
  44. characteristics
  45. checked
  46. checking
  47. cheers
  48. clothes
  49. colleague
  50. collect
  51. command
  52. companionship
  53. confiscated
  54. congo
  55. conservation
  56. containers
  57. continents
  58. contraband
  59. coppolillo
  60. corner
  61. count
  62. couple
  63. crazy
  64. crime
  65. desire
  66. destructive
  67. detect
  68. detected
  69. detection
  70. difference
  71. directions
  72. director
  73. distance
  74. disturb
  75. dna
  76. dog
  77. dogs
  78. door
  79. dozens
  80. dr
  81. drive
  82. dropped
  83. drops
  84. elephant
  85. ended
  86. energy
  87. enjoying
  88. eradicate
  89. escaped
  90. established
  91. evidence
  92. evolution
  93. exception
  94. exceptional
  95. executive
  96. famously
  97. fear
  98. feet
  99. find
  100. firing
  101. flowers
  102. food
  103. game
  104. give
  105. good
  106. great
  107. grizzly
  108. gun
  109. guns
  110. guys
  111. handler
  112. handmade
  113. happy
  114. hard
  115. head
  116. helena
  117. hid
  118. high
  119. history
  120. hit
  121. homemade
  122. horn
  123. horrible
  124. hours
  125. huge
  126. human
  127. illegal
  128. inability
  129. indian
  130. indoors
  131. infestation
  132. information
  133. insisted
  134. intensive
  135. interesting
  136. ivory
  137. job
  138. kind
  139. knew
  140. knocked
  141. lap
  142. larval
  143. laughter
  144. learned
  145. life
  146. litter
  147. live
  148. lives
  149. livestock
  150. loaded
  151. looked
  152. lots
  153. love
  154. luggage
  155. making
  156. matchbox
  157. meadows
  158. meaning
  159. means
  160. meat
  161. meet
  162. meg
  163. megan
  164. microscopic
  165. minibus
  166. minivan
  167. minutes
  168. missoula
  169. montana
  170. months
  171. mount
  172. move
  173. moving
  174. mussels
  175. muzzleloaders
  176. narcotics
  177. national
  178. noticed
  179. noxious
  180. open
  181. overwhelming
  182. owner
  183. pair
  184. park
  185. passengers
  186. pastures
  187. pees
  188. people
  189. pepin
  190. percent
  191. pete
  192. pets
  193. picked
  194. piece
  195. pin
  196. places
  197. planet
  198. plastic
  199. poached
  200. poachers
  201. poaching
  202. ports
  203. pot
  204. practice
  205. preference
  206. primer
  207. progress
  208. puppy
  209. put
  210. quit
  211. ready
  212. reason
  213. reject
  214. reservation
  215. resilience
  216. rhino
  217. rid
  218. rifle
  219. roadblock
  220. roadblocks
  221. roads
  222. rocks
  223. room
  224. ruger
  225. rule
  226. run
  227. runs
  228. samples
  229. sat
  230. scary
  231. scats
  232. scene
  233. scent
  234. scour
  235. scouts
  236. seamus
  237. search
  238. searched
  239. searchers
  240. searching
  241. seeds
  242. sentinel
  243. setting
  244. shelter
  245. shelters
  246. shipped
  247. shot
  248. show
  249. signal
  250. sits
  251. slabbery
  252. smell
  253. snapped
  254. snared
  255. speaking
  256. species
  257. specifically
  258. spirits
  259. stage
  260. stared
  261. started
  262. states
  263. stay
  264. stop
  265. stories
  266. study
  267. stuff
  268. suddenly
  269. talk
  270. tanzania
  271. telling
  272. tells
  273. thinking
  274. throw
  275. throwing
  276. time
  277. tiny
  278. top
  279. trafficked
  280. train
  281. trained
  282. trainer
  283. training
  284. turns
  285. tusk
  286. unbelievable
  287. unloaded
  288. unrelenting
  289. unthinkable
  290. update
  291. vehicles
  292. vest
  293. village
  294. watch
  295. weed
  296. weird
  297. whip
  298. wicket
  299. wild
  300. woad
  301. wolverine
  302. work
  303. worked
  304. working
  305. works
  306. world
  307. worlds
  308. wrapped
  309. year
  310. years
  311. zambia
  312. zebra