full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Neri Oxman: Design at the intersection of technology and biology

Unscramble the Blue Letters

we ordered a bunch of shrimp shells, we gnrdied them and we produced chitosan paste. By varying cceamihl cnoctaoentrins, we were able to aeihvce a wide array of properties — from dark, stiff and opaque, to lhigt, soft and transparent. In order to print the structures in large scale, we bulit a robotically controlled extrusion system with mupiltle nozzles. The robot would vary material properties on the fly and create these 12-foot-long structures made of a single material, 100 percent recyclable. When the parts are ready, they're left to dry and find a form naltlrauy upon cotncat with air. So why are we still designing with plastics? The air bubbles that were a byproduct of the printing process were used to contain photosynthetic microorganisms that first appeared on our planet 3.5 billion year ago, as we leanred yesterday. Together with our collaborators at Harvard and MIT, we embedded bacteria that were genetically engineered to rapidly capture carbon from the amhosetrpe and convert it into sugar. For the first time, we were able to generate steutcrrus that would sesamslely transition from beam to mesh, and if scaled even larger, to wwnoids. A fruit-bearing fruit tree. Working with an anienct material, one of the first lifeforms on the planet, plenty of water and a little bit of synthetic boligoy, we were able to transform a structure made of shrimp shells into an architecture that behaves like a tree. And here's the best part: for ocbtejs designed to biodegrade, put them in the sea, and they will nourish marine life; place them in soil, and they will help grow a tree.

Open Cloze

we ordered a bunch of shrimp shells, we _______ them and we produced chitosan paste. By varying ________ ______________, we were able to _______ a wide array of properties — from dark, stiff and opaque, to _____, soft and transparent. In order to print the structures in large scale, we _____ a robotically controlled extrusion system with ________ nozzles. The robot would vary material properties on the fly and create these 12-foot-long structures made of a single material, 100 percent recyclable. When the parts are ready, they're left to dry and find a form _________ upon _______ with air. So why are we still designing with plastics? The air bubbles that were a byproduct of the printing process were used to contain photosynthetic microorganisms that first appeared on our planet 3.5 billion year ago, as we _______ yesterday. Together with our collaborators at Harvard and MIT, we embedded bacteria that were genetically engineered to rapidly capture carbon from the __________ and convert it into sugar. For the first time, we were able to generate __________ that would __________ transition from beam to mesh, and if scaled even larger, to _______. A fruit-bearing fruit tree. Working with an _______ material, one of the first lifeforms on the planet, plenty of water and a little bit of synthetic _______, we were able to transform a structure made of shrimp shells into an architecture that behaves like a tree. And here's the best part: for _______ designed to biodegrade, put them in the sea, and they will nourish marine life; place them in soil, and they will help grow a tree.

Solution

  1. objects
  2. structures
  3. naturally
  4. biology
  5. light
  6. learned
  7. windows
  8. chemical
  9. atmosphere
  10. grinded
  11. multiple
  12. built
  13. ancient
  14. seamlessly
  15. achieve
  16. contact
  17. concentrations

Original Text

we ordered a bunch of shrimp shells, we grinded them and we produced chitosan paste. By varying chemical concentrations, we were able to achieve a wide array of properties — from dark, stiff and opaque, to light, soft and transparent. In order to print the structures in large scale, we built a robotically controlled extrusion system with multiple nozzles. The robot would vary material properties on the fly and create these 12-foot-long structures made of a single material, 100 percent recyclable. When the parts are ready, they're left to dry and find a form naturally upon contact with air. So why are we still designing with plastics? The air bubbles that were a byproduct of the printing process were used to contain photosynthetic microorganisms that first appeared on our planet 3.5 billion year ago, as we learned yesterday. Together with our collaborators at Harvard and MIT, we embedded bacteria that were genetically engineered to rapidly capture carbon from the atmosphere and convert it into sugar. For the first time, we were able to generate structures that would seamlessly transition from beam to mesh, and if scaled even larger, to windows. A fruit-bearing fruit tree. Working with an ancient material, one of the first lifeforms on the planet, plenty of water and a little bit of synthetic biology, we were able to transform a structure made of shrimp shells into an architecture that behaves like a tree. And here's the best part: for objects designed to biodegrade, put them in the sea, and they will nourish marine life; place them in soil, and they will help grow a tree.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
biological functionality 2
genetically engineered 2
varying material 2
fruit tree 2
generate structures 2
material properties 2

Important Words

  1. achieve
  2. air
  3. ancient
  4. appeared
  5. architecture
  6. array
  7. atmosphere
  8. bacteria
  9. beam
  10. behaves
  11. billion
  12. biodegrade
  13. biology
  14. bit
  15. bubbles
  16. built
  17. bunch
  18. byproduct
  19. capture
  20. carbon
  21. chemical
  22. chitosan
  23. collaborators
  24. concentrations
  25. contact
  26. controlled
  27. convert
  28. create
  29. dark
  30. designed
  31. designing
  32. dry
  33. embedded
  34. engineered
  35. extrusion
  36. find
  37. fly
  38. form
  39. fruit
  40. generate
  41. genetically
  42. grinded
  43. grow
  44. harvard
  45. large
  46. larger
  47. learned
  48. left
  49. lifeforms
  50. light
  51. marine
  52. material
  53. mesh
  54. microorganisms
  55. mit
  56. multiple
  57. naturally
  58. nourish
  59. nozzles
  60. objects
  61. opaque
  62. order
  63. ordered
  64. parts
  65. paste
  66. percent
  67. photosynthetic
  68. place
  69. planet
  70. plastics
  71. plenty
  72. print
  73. printing
  74. process
  75. produced
  76. properties
  77. put
  78. rapidly
  79. ready
  80. recyclable
  81. robot
  82. robotically
  83. scale
  84. scaled
  85. sea
  86. seamlessly
  87. shells
  88. shrimp
  89. single
  90. soft
  91. soil
  92. stiff
  93. structure
  94. structures
  95. sugar
  96. synthetic
  97. system
  98. time
  99. transform
  100. transition
  101. transparent
  102. tree
  103. vary
  104. varying
  105. water
  106. wide
  107. windows
  108. working
  109. year
  110. yesterday