full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Thea Holcomb: How peer educators can transform sex education

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Greetings audience, I'm Thea, I'm a high school student, and toady we're going to talk about sex. [It won't be too scary.] Operating on the assumption you're human, you've certainly heard of sex. In case you haven't, to get you up to speed, sex is the process by which many organisms esnure their continued existence. Here's the thing though: sex is more complicated than that because - soilper alert! - humans are complicated. So how do we learn about sex if it's so ceapciotmld? You might remember sex education like this: [Don't have sex; you will get PREGNANT and die.] Urban Dictionary - your source for news and information about the 21st century zeisgteit - describes sex education as: ".. where they try to scrae you out of having sex with pictures of diseased genitals..." A more hopeful description of sex eoaitdcun would be something like: a lifelong process of learning about sex and sexuality, exploring values and beliefs and giinnag skills to navigate relationships and manage your sexual health. This, as far as I'm concerned, is a solid definition. So what can we do to make sex education something that tenes find actually, like, educational. Clearly, teens need answers to their questions. Where do people go when they have questions? [The Internet] Listen, I love the Internet. It's one of the greatest developments in hmuan information exchange. [Yes. Thanks Internet.] But what it says about sexual health is not acartcue by any stretch of the imagination or is so laden with bias that it feels more like being pelted with jgeumdent than actually rcneveiig information. Unfortunately, not every teen is willing and able to chat it up with their parents about sex. So if not always the Internet, where can teens turn? Enter the peer edctouar. People my age do, indeed, talk to each other about sex. So when teens are seurocs of accurate information, it spreads among us quickly. As a peer educator, I belong to a program that gives me the tools to learn about everything from STIs and safe sex to contraception and csnnoet. Basically, I can tell you more about human sxiletauy than the average adult. When teens see someone like me instead of someone older, they're quite open to the information I have to ofefr them. At lunch once, some friends wanted to know the difference between hormonal and copper IUDs. So I brought this to the talbe. Another day, my teacher didn't understand how emergency coactneotrpin wokrs. So I exlniepad it to the clsas. What does it look like when teens ask me questions about sexual health? It goes something like this. vnreaeel dessaie, STD, STI? This terminology, it bfefals me. STI stands for slluaxey taertnmstid itnficoen. We used to say STD, which stood for sexually transmitted disease, but it was changed recently because STI is a more medically accurate term, and taking away the big scary word "disease" helps decrease stigma. What the heck is tomhcorniiaiss? Well, trichomoniasis is a STI usually spread through vaginal intercourse. It's curable with just one dose of an oral drug. Common symptoms, regardless of a person's sex, are unusual discharge, painful urination and ictnhig. But it spreads really quickly because most of the time it's asymptomatic, which means people don't realize they have it. That's why it's so important to get tested regularly. Is it OK to be gay? Yes, all people of all identities and backgrounds, including on the LGBTQ+ spectrum, can live hhetlay and productive lives. Regardless of your beliefs, everyone has the right to explore and express their sexuality without the fear of shmae or judgement. Thanks! So often, when my peers approach me with questions like these, seeking this or that piece of information, at least a sliver of what they're wondering is: "Am I normal?" So let's talk about normal. Part of the point of peer education is to give teens the ouitpnprtoy to understand that there is no such thing as the elusive "normal." Peer educators are here to say they're amred with information that empowers you to make informed decisions; you are going to be OK. "Normal" isn't really necessary. When you can get accurate, judgement-free information from your peers, you realize that sex-ed doesn't have to be scary. So instead of striving to be nmroal, let's talk to each other. Since peer education allows sex-ed to reach the community in ways that go far beyond pictures of diseased gielntas, it turns out to be pretty bnailirlt. An idea that, unlike trichomoniasis, is certainly worth sapreindg.

Open Cloze

Greetings audience, I'm Thea, I'm a high school student, and _____ we're going to talk about sex. [It won't be too scary.] Operating on the assumption you're human, you've certainly heard of sex. In case you haven't, to get you up to speed, sex is the process by which many organisms ______ their continued existence. Here's the thing though: sex is more complicated than that because - _______ alert! - humans are complicated. So how do we learn about sex if it's so ___________? You might remember sex education like this: [Don't have sex; you will get PREGNANT and die.] Urban Dictionary - your source for news and information about the 21st century _________ - describes sex education as: ".. where they try to _____ you out of having sex with pictures of diseased genitals..." A more hopeful description of sex _________ would be something like: a lifelong process of learning about sex and sexuality, exploring values and beliefs and _______ skills to navigate relationships and manage your sexual health. This, as far as I'm concerned, is a solid definition. So what can we do to make sex education something that _____ find actually, like, educational. Clearly, teens need answers to their questions. Where do people go when they have questions? [The Internet] Listen, I love the Internet. It's one of the greatest developments in _____ information exchange. [Yes. Thanks Internet.] But what it says about sexual health is not ________ by any stretch of the imagination or is so laden with bias that it feels more like being pelted with _________ than actually _________ information. Unfortunately, not every teen is willing and able to chat it up with their parents about sex. So if not always the Internet, where can teens turn? Enter the peer ________. People my age do, indeed, talk to each other about sex. So when teens are _______ of accurate information, it spreads among us quickly. As a peer educator, I belong to a program that gives me the tools to learn about everything from STIs and safe sex to contraception and _______. Basically, I can tell you more about human _________ than the average adult. When teens see someone like me instead of someone older, they're quite open to the information I have to _____ them. At lunch once, some friends wanted to know the difference between hormonal and copper IUDs. So I brought this to the _____. Another day, my teacher didn't understand how emergency _____________ _____. So I _________ it to the _____. What does it look like when teens ask me questions about sexual health? It goes something like this. ________ _______, STD, STI? This terminology, it _______ me. STI stands for ________ ___________ _________. We used to say STD, which stood for sexually transmitted disease, but it was changed recently because STI is a more medically accurate term, and taking away the big scary word "disease" helps decrease stigma. What the heck is ______________? Well, trichomoniasis is a STI usually spread through vaginal intercourse. It's curable with just one dose of an oral drug. Common symptoms, regardless of a person's sex, are unusual discharge, painful urination and _______. But it spreads really quickly because most of the time it's asymptomatic, which means people don't realize they have it. That's why it's so important to get tested regularly. Is it OK to be gay? Yes, all people of all identities and backgrounds, including on the LGBTQ+ spectrum, can live _______ and productive lives. Regardless of your beliefs, everyone has the right to explore and express their sexuality without the fear of _____ or judgement. Thanks! So often, when my peers approach me with questions like these, seeking this or that piece of information, at least a sliver of what they're wondering is: "Am I normal?" So let's talk about normal. Part of the point of peer education is to give teens the ___________ to understand that there is no such thing as the elusive "normal." Peer educators are here to say they're _____ with information that empowers you to make informed decisions; you are going to be OK. "Normal" isn't really necessary. When you can get accurate, judgement-free information from your peers, you realize that sex-ed doesn't have to be scary. So instead of striving to be ______, let's talk to each other. Since peer education allows sex-ed to reach the community in ways that go far beyond pictures of diseased ________, it turns out to be pretty _________. An idea that, unlike trichomoniasis, is certainly worth _________.

Solution

  1. genitals
  2. contraception
  3. healthy
  4. brilliant
  5. infection
  6. sources
  7. education
  8. itching
  9. complicated
  10. shame
  11. armed
  12. trichomoniasis
  13. transmitted
  14. works
  15. zeitgeist
  16. scare
  17. accurate
  18. educator
  19. offer
  20. disease
  21. baffles
  22. today
  23. receiving
  24. explained
  25. judgement
  26. sexually
  27. consent
  28. gaining
  29. ensure
  30. teens
  31. venereal
  32. table
  33. class
  34. normal
  35. human
  36. spreading
  37. opportunity
  38. spoiler
  39. sexuality

Original Text

Greetings audience, I'm Thea, I'm a high school student, and today we're going to talk about sex. [It won't be too scary.] Operating on the assumption you're human, you've certainly heard of sex. In case you haven't, to get you up to speed, sex is the process by which many organisms ensure their continued existence. Here's the thing though: sex is more complicated than that because - spoiler alert! - humans are complicated. So how do we learn about sex if it's so complicated? You might remember sex education like this: [Don't have sex; you will get PREGNANT and die.] Urban Dictionary - your source for news and information about the 21st century zeitgeist - describes sex education as: ".. where they try to scare you out of having sex with pictures of diseased genitals..." A more hopeful description of sex education would be something like: a lifelong process of learning about sex and sexuality, exploring values and beliefs and gaining skills to navigate relationships and manage your sexual health. This, as far as I'm concerned, is a solid definition. So what can we do to make sex education something that teens find actually, like, educational. Clearly, teens need answers to their questions. Where do people go when they have questions? [The Internet] Listen, I love the Internet. It's one of the greatest developments in human information exchange. [Yes. Thanks Internet.] But what it says about sexual health is not accurate by any stretch of the imagination or is so laden with bias that it feels more like being pelted with judgement than actually receiving information. Unfortunately, not every teen is willing and able to chat it up with their parents about sex. So if not always the Internet, where can teens turn? Enter the peer educator. People my age do, indeed, talk to each other about sex. So when teens are sources of accurate information, it spreads among us quickly. As a peer educator, I belong to a program that gives me the tools to learn about everything from STIs and safe sex to contraception and consent. Basically, I can tell you more about human sexuality than the average adult. When teens see someone like me instead of someone older, they're quite open to the information I have to offer them. At lunch once, some friends wanted to know the difference between hormonal and copper IUDs. So I brought this to the table. Another day, my teacher didn't understand how emergency contraception works. So I explained it to the class. What does it look like when teens ask me questions about sexual health? It goes something like this. Venereal disease, STD, STI? This terminology, it baffles me. STI stands for sexually transmitted infection. We used to say STD, which stood for sexually transmitted disease, but it was changed recently because STI is a more medically accurate term, and taking away the big scary word "disease" helps decrease stigma. What the heck is trichomoniasis? Well, trichomoniasis is a STI usually spread through vaginal intercourse. It's curable with just one dose of an oral drug. Common symptoms, regardless of a person's sex, are unusual discharge, painful urination and itching. But it spreads really quickly because most of the time it's asymptomatic, which means people don't realize they have it. That's why it's so important to get tested regularly. Is it OK to be gay? Yes, all people of all identities and backgrounds, including on the LGBTQ+ spectrum, can live healthy and productive lives. Regardless of your beliefs, everyone has the right to explore and express their sexuality without the fear of shame or judgement. Thanks! So often, when my peers approach me with questions like these, seeking this or that piece of information, at least a sliver of what they're wondering is: "Am I normal?" So let's talk about normal. Part of the point of peer education is to give teens the opportunity to understand that there is no such thing as the elusive "normal." Peer educators are here to say they're armed with information that empowers you to make informed decisions; you are going to be OK. "Normal" isn't really necessary. When you can get accurate, judgement-free information from your peers, you realize that sex-ed doesn't have to be scary. So instead of striving to be normal, let's talk to each other. Since peer education allows sex-ed to reach the community in ways that go far beyond pictures of diseased genitals, it turns out to be pretty brilliant. An idea that, unlike trichomoniasis, is certainly worth spreading.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
sex education 4
sexual health 2
sexually transmitted 2
peer education 2

Important Words

  1. accurate
  2. adult
  3. age
  4. answers
  5. approach
  6. armed
  7. assumption
  8. asymptomatic
  9. audience
  10. average
  11. backgrounds
  12. baffles
  13. basically
  14. beliefs
  15. belong
  16. bias
  17. big
  18. brilliant
  19. brought
  20. case
  21. century
  22. changed
  23. chat
  24. class
  25. common
  26. community
  27. complicated
  28. concerned
  29. consent
  30. continued
  31. contraception
  32. copper
  33. curable
  34. day
  35. decrease
  36. definition
  37. describes
  38. description
  39. developments
  40. dictionary
  41. die
  42. difference
  43. discharge
  44. disease
  45. diseased
  46. dose
  47. drug
  48. education
  49. educational
  50. educator
  51. educators
  52. elusive
  53. emergency
  54. empowers
  55. ensure
  56. enter
  57. exchange
  58. existence
  59. explained
  60. explore
  61. exploring
  62. express
  63. fear
  64. feels
  65. find
  66. friends
  67. gaining
  68. gay
  69. genitals
  70. give
  71. greatest
  72. health
  73. healthy
  74. heard
  75. heck
  76. helps
  77. high
  78. hopeful
  79. hormonal
  80. human
  81. humans
  82. idea
  83. identities
  84. imagination
  85. important
  86. including
  87. infection
  88. information
  89. informed
  90. intercourse
  91. internet
  92. itching
  93. iuds
  94. judgement
  95. laden
  96. learn
  97. learning
  98. lifelong
  99. listen
  100. live
  101. lives
  102. love
  103. lunch
  104. manage
  105. means
  106. medically
  107. navigate
  108. news
  109. normal
  110. offer
  111. older
  112. open
  113. operating
  114. opportunity
  115. oral
  116. organisms
  117. painful
  118. parents
  119. part
  120. peer
  121. peers
  122. pelted
  123. people
  124. pictures
  125. piece
  126. point
  127. pregnant
  128. pretty
  129. process
  130. productive
  131. program
  132. questions
  133. quickly
  134. reach
  135. realize
  136. receiving
  137. regularly
  138. relationships
  139. remember
  140. safe
  141. scare
  142. scary
  143. school
  144. seeking
  145. sex
  146. sexual
  147. sexuality
  148. sexually
  149. shame
  150. skills
  151. sliver
  152. solid
  153. source
  154. sources
  155. spectrum
  156. speed
  157. spoiler
  158. spread
  159. spreading
  160. spreads
  161. stands
  162. std
  163. sti
  164. stigma
  165. stis
  166. stood
  167. stretch
  168. striving
  169. student
  170. symptoms
  171. table
  172. talk
  173. teacher
  174. teen
  175. teens
  176. term
  177. terminology
  178. tested
  179. thea
  180. time
  181. today
  182. tools
  183. transmitted
  184. trichomoniasis
  185. turn
  186. turns
  187. understand
  188. unusual
  189. urban
  190. urination
  191. vaginal
  192. values
  193. venereal
  194. wanted
  195. ways
  196. wondering
  197. word
  198. works
  199. worth
  200. zeitgeist