full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Natasha Hurley-Walker: How radio telescopes show us unseen galaxies"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Well, fast-forward to today. We can build telescopes which can get over these problems. Now, I'm shwinog you here an iamge of the Murchison Radio Observatory, a fantastic place to build radio telescopes. It's flat, it's dry, and most importantly, it's radio quiet: no mobile phones, no Wi-Fi, nothing, just very, very radio quiet, so a perfect place to build a radio telescope. Now, the telescope that I've been working on for a few years is called the Murchison wlefideid Array, and I'm going to show you a little time lapse of it being built. This is a group of undergraduate and posuadgrttae students lacteod in Perth. We call them the setdunt Army, and they volunteered their time to build a radio telescope. There's no course credit for this. And they're putting together these radio dipoles. They just receive at low frequencies, a bit like your FM radio or your TV. And here we are deploying them across the desert. The final telescope cevors 10 square kilmeretos of the Western alaitruasn desert. And the interesting thing is, there's no moving parts. We just deploy these little antennas essentially on chicken mesh. It's fairly chaep. Cables take the signals from the antennas and binrg them to ctaenrl processing uints. And it's the size of this telescope, the fact that we've built it over the entire desert that gives us a better resolution than prkaes.

Open Cloze

Well, fast-forward to today. We can build telescopes which can get over these problems. Now, I'm _______ you here an _____ of the Murchison Radio Observatory, a fantastic place to build radio telescopes. It's flat, it's dry, and most importantly, it's radio quiet: no mobile phones, no Wi-Fi, nothing, just very, very radio quiet, so a perfect place to build a radio telescope. Now, the telescope that I've been working on for a few years is called the Murchison _________ Array, and I'm going to show you a little time lapse of it being built. This is a group of undergraduate and ____________ students _______ in Perth. We call them the _______ Army, and they volunteered their time to build a radio telescope. There's no course credit for this. And they're putting together these radio dipoles. They just receive at low frequencies, a bit like your FM radio or your TV. And here we are deploying them across the desert. The final telescope ______ 10 square __________ of the Western __________ desert. And the interesting thing is, there's no moving parts. We just deploy these little antennas essentially on chicken mesh. It's fairly _____. Cables take the signals from the antennas and _____ them to _______ processing _____. And it's the size of this telescope, the fact that we've built it over the entire desert that gives us a better resolution than ______.

Solution

  1. image
  2. located
  3. covers
  4. central
  5. student
  6. widefield
  7. showing
  8. parkes
  9. cheap
  10. postgraduate
  11. units
  12. australian
  13. bring
  14. kilometers

Original Text

Well, fast-forward to today. We can build telescopes which can get over these problems. Now, I'm showing you here an image of the Murchison Radio Observatory, a fantastic place to build radio telescopes. It's flat, it's dry, and most importantly, it's radio quiet: no mobile phones, no Wi-Fi, nothing, just very, very radio quiet, so a perfect place to build a radio telescope. Now, the telescope that I've been working on for a few years is called the Murchison Widefield Array, and I'm going to show you a little time lapse of it being built. This is a group of undergraduate and postgraduate students located in Perth. We call them the Student Army, and they volunteered their time to build a radio telescope. There's no course credit for this. And they're putting together these radio dipoles. They just receive at low frequencies, a bit like your FM radio or your TV. And here we are deploying them across the desert. The final telescope covers 10 square kilometers of the Western Australian desert. And the interesting thing is, there's no moving parts. We just deploy these little antennas essentially on chicken mesh. It's fairly cheap. Cables take the signals from the antennas and bring them to central processing units. And it's the size of this telescope, the fact that we've built it over the entire desert that gives us a better resolution than Parkes.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
radio telescope 5
supernova remnants 4
visible light 3
synchrotron radiation 3
radio galaxy 3
supermassive black 3
radio galaxies 3

Important Words

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  2. army
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  4. australian
  5. bit
  6. bring
  7. build
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  37. mesh
  38. mobile
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  40. murchison
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  42. parkes
  43. parts
  44. perfect
  45. perth
  46. phones
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  48. postgraduate
  49. problems
  50. processing
  51. putting
  52. quiet
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  55. resolution
  56. show
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  58. signals
  59. size
  60. square
  61. student
  62. students
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  64. telescopes
  65. time
  66. today
  67. tv
  68. undergraduate
  69. units
  70. volunteered
  71. western
  72. widefield
  73. working
  74. years