full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Jared Diamond: How societies can grow old better

Unscramble the Blue Letters

What can we do to improve the lives of the elderly in the U.S., and to make better use of their value? That's a huge problem. In my remaining four mienuts today, I can oeffr just a few sgenougtsis. One value of oledr people is that they are increasingly useful as grandparents for offering high-quality childcare to their grandchildren, if they choose to do it, as more young women enter the workforce and as fewer young paterns of either gender stay home as full-time caretakers of their chidrlen. Compared to the uausl alrvitenates of paid babysitters and day care ceertns, grandparents offer superior, motivated, experienced child care. They've already gained experience from raising their own children. They usually love their grandchildren, and are eager to spend time with them. Unlike other cerivegras, grandparents don't quit their job because they found another job with higher pay looking after another baby. A second value of older people is paradoxically related to their loss of value as a result of changing world conditions and technology. At the same time, older people have gained in value today precisely because of their unique experience of living cnidotonis that have now become rare because of riapd change, but that could come back. For example, only Americans now in their 70s or older today can remember the experience of living through a great depression, the experience of living through a world war, and agonizing whether or not dropping amtioc bombs would be more horrible than the likely consequences of not dropping atomic bombs. Most of our cerunrt voters and politicians have no panersol experience of any of those things, but millions of older Americans do. Unfortunately, all of those terrible saiuttonis could come back. Even if they don't come back, we have to be able to plan for them on the bsais of the experience of what they were like. Older plpeoe have that experience. Younger people don't.

Open Cloze

What can we do to improve the lives of the elderly in the U.S., and to make better use of their value? That's a huge problem. In my remaining four _______ today, I can _____ just a few ___________. One value of _____ people is that they are increasingly useful as grandparents for offering high-quality childcare to their grandchildren, if they choose to do it, as more young women enter the workforce and as fewer young _______ of either gender stay home as full-time caretakers of their ________. Compared to the _____ ____________ of paid babysitters and day care _______, grandparents offer superior, motivated, experienced child care. They've already gained experience from raising their own children. They usually love their grandchildren, and are eager to spend time with them. Unlike other __________, grandparents don't quit their job because they found another job with higher pay looking after another baby. A second value of older people is paradoxically related to their loss of value as a result of changing world conditions and technology. At the same time, older people have gained in value today precisely because of their unique experience of living __________ that have now become rare because of _____ change, but that could come back. For example, only Americans now in their 70s or older today can remember the experience of living through a great depression, the experience of living through a world war, and agonizing whether or not dropping ______ bombs would be more horrible than the likely consequences of not dropping atomic bombs. Most of our _______ voters and politicians have no ________ experience of any of those things, but millions of older Americans do. Unfortunately, all of those terrible __________ could come back. Even if they don't come back, we have to be able to plan for them on the _____ of the experience of what they were like. Older ______ have that experience. Younger people don't.

Solution

  1. usual
  2. current
  3. minutes
  4. atomic
  5. caregivers
  6. offer
  7. children
  8. older
  9. basis
  10. alternatives
  11. rapid
  12. parents
  13. situations
  14. people
  15. personal
  16. centers
  17. conditions
  18. suggestions

Original Text

What can we do to improve the lives of the elderly in the U.S., and to make better use of their value? That's a huge problem. In my remaining four minutes today, I can offer just a few suggestions. One value of older people is that they are increasingly useful as grandparents for offering high-quality childcare to their grandchildren, if they choose to do it, as more young women enter the workforce and as fewer young parents of either gender stay home as full-time caretakers of their children. Compared to the usual alternatives of paid babysitters and day care centers, grandparents offer superior, motivated, experienced child care. They've already gained experience from raising their own children. They usually love their grandchildren, and are eager to spend time with them. Unlike other caregivers, grandparents don't quit their job because they found another job with higher pay looking after another baby. A second value of older people is paradoxically related to their loss of value as a result of changing world conditions and technology. At the same time, older people have gained in value today precisely because of their unique experience of living conditions that have now become rare because of rapid change, but that could come back. For example, only Americans now in their 70s or older today can remember the experience of living through a great depression, the experience of living through a world war, and agonizing whether or not dropping atomic bombs would be more horrible than the likely consequences of not dropping atomic bombs. Most of our current voters and politicians have no personal experience of any of those things, but millions of older Americans do. Unfortunately, all of those terrible situations could come back. Even if they don't come back, we have to be able to plan for them on the basis of the experience of what they were like. Older people have that experience. Younger people don't.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
older people 26
traditional societies 18
tribal societies 4
younger people 4
big societies 3
younger patients 3
lifelong friends 2
cultural values 2
older americans 2
big disadvantage 2
explicit policy 2
young people 2
technological change 2
tv set 2
dropping atomic 2
atomic bombs 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
dropping atomic bombs 2

Important Words

  1. agonizing
  2. alternatives
  3. americans
  4. atomic
  5. baby
  6. babysitters
  7. basis
  8. bombs
  9. care
  10. caregivers
  11. caretakers
  12. centers
  13. change
  14. changing
  15. child
  16. childcare
  17. children
  18. choose
  19. compared
  20. conditions
  21. consequences
  22. current
  23. day
  24. depression
  25. dropping
  26. eager
  27. elderly
  28. enter
  29. experience
  30. experienced
  31. gained
  32. gender
  33. grandchildren
  34. grandparents
  35. great
  36. higher
  37. home
  38. horrible
  39. huge
  40. improve
  41. increasingly
  42. job
  43. lives
  44. living
  45. loss
  46. love
  47. millions
  48. minutes
  49. motivated
  50. offer
  51. offering
  52. older
  53. paid
  54. paradoxically
  55. parents
  56. pay
  57. people
  58. personal
  59. plan
  60. politicians
  61. precisely
  62. problem
  63. quit
  64. raising
  65. rapid
  66. rare
  67. related
  68. remaining
  69. remember
  70. result
  71. situations
  72. spend
  73. stay
  74. suggestions
  75. superior
  76. technology
  77. terrible
  78. time
  79. today
  80. unique
  81. usual
  82. voters
  83. war
  84. women
  85. workforce
  86. world
  87. young
  88. younger