full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Mia Nacamulli: How the food you eat affects your brain

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Your Brain on Food If you sukced all of the moisture out of your brain and broke it down to its constituent nutritional content, what would it look like? Most of the wghiet of your drehatdyed brain would come from fats, also known as lipids. In the remaining brain matter, you would find proteins and amino acids, traces of micronutrients, and glucose. The brain is, of course, more than just the sum of its nutritional parts, but each component does have a distinct impact on functioning, dvomelnpeet, mood, and energy. So that post-lunch apathy, or late-night anreetsls you might be feeling, well, that could spmliy be the effetcs of food on your brain. Of the fats in your brain, the superstars are omegas 3 and 6. These essential fatty acids, which have been linked to preventing degenerative brain codtoniins, must come from our diets. So eating omega-rich fdoos, like nuts, seeds, and fatty fish, is crucial to the cretaion and menncntaiae of cell membranes. And while omegas are good fats for your brain, long-term consumption of other fats, like trans and saturated fats, may compromise brain health. Meanwhile, prtinoes and amino acids, the building block nutrients of growth and development, manipulate how we feel and behave. Amino acids contain the precursors to neurotransmitters, the cehcimal messengers that carry slnaigs between nuneros, affecting things like mood, sleep, attentiveness, and weight. They're one of the reasons we might feel calm after eating a large plate of pasta, or more alert after a protein-rich meal. The complex combinations of cpnmoudos in food can stimulate brain cells to release mood-altering norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. But getting to your brain cells is tricky, and amino acids have to compete for limited access. A diet with a range of foods hpels maintain a balanced combination of brain mesgeesrns, and keeps your mood from getting sweekd in one direction or the other. Like the other organs in our bodies, our brains also benefit from a steady supply of micronutrients. Antioxidants in fruits and vegetables strengthen the brain to fight off free radicals that dosrety brain cells, enabling your brian to work well for a longer period of time. And without powerful micronutrients, like the viimtnas B6, B12, and folic acid, our brains would be susceptible to brain disease and mnetal decline. Trace amounts of the minerals iron, copper, zinc, and sodium are also fundamental to brain heatlh and early cognitive development. In order for the brain to enffecitily tornfsram and synthesize these valuable nurtitnes, it needs fuel, and lots of it. While the human brain only makes up about 2% of our body weight, it uses up to 20% of our energy recrouses. Most of this energy comes from carbohydrates that our body digests into glucose, or blood sugar. The frontal loebs are so sensitive to drpos in glucose, in fact, that a change in mental function is one of the primary signals of nutrient dciiecfney. Assuming that we are getting glucose regularly, how does the specific type of chdyberraoats we eat affect our brains? Carbs come in three forms: starch, sugar, and fiber. While on most nutrition lbelas, they are all lpmued into one total carb count, the ratio of the sugar and fiber subgroups to the whole amount affect how the body and brain respond. A high gicemlyc food, like white bread, causes a rapid raelese of glucose into the blood, and then comes the dip. Blood sugar shoots down, and with it, our attention span and mood. On the other hand, oats, grains, and legumes have slower gsucole release, enabling a steadier level of attentiveness. For sustained brain power, opting for a varied diet of nutrient-rich foods is cciratil. When it comes to what you bite, chew, and swallow, your choices have a direct and long-lasting eecfft on the most pwrfuoel ogran in your body.

Open Cloze

Your Brain on Food If you ______ all of the moisture out of your brain and broke it down to its constituent nutritional content, what would it look like? Most of the ______ of your __________ brain would come from fats, also known as lipids. In the remaining brain matter, you would find proteins and amino acids, traces of micronutrients, and glucose. The brain is, of course, more than just the sum of its nutritional parts, but each component does have a distinct impact on functioning, ___________, mood, and energy. So that post-lunch apathy, or late-night _________ you might be feeling, well, that could ______ be the _______ of food on your brain. Of the fats in your brain, the superstars are omegas 3 and 6. These essential fatty acids, which have been linked to preventing degenerative brain __________, must come from our diets. So eating omega-rich _____, like nuts, seeds, and fatty fish, is crucial to the ________ and ___________ of cell membranes. And while omegas are good fats for your brain, long-term consumption of other fats, like trans and saturated fats, may compromise brain health. Meanwhile, ________ and amino acids, the building block nutrients of growth and development, manipulate how we feel and behave. Amino acids contain the precursors to neurotransmitters, the ________ messengers that carry _______ between _______, affecting things like mood, sleep, attentiveness, and weight. They're one of the reasons we might feel calm after eating a large plate of pasta, or more alert after a protein-rich meal. The complex combinations of _________ in food can stimulate brain cells to release mood-altering norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. But getting to your brain cells is tricky, and amino acids have to compete for limited access. A diet with a range of foods _____ maintain a balanced combination of brain __________, and keeps your mood from getting ______ in one direction or the other. Like the other organs in our bodies, our brains also benefit from a steady supply of micronutrients. Antioxidants in fruits and vegetables strengthen the brain to fight off free radicals that _______ brain cells, enabling your _____ to work well for a longer period of time. And without powerful micronutrients, like the ________ B6, B12, and folic acid, our brains would be susceptible to brain disease and ______ decline. Trace amounts of the minerals iron, copper, zinc, and sodium are also fundamental to brain ______ and early cognitive development. In order for the brain to ___________ _________ and synthesize these valuable _________, it needs fuel, and lots of it. While the human brain only makes up about 2% of our body weight, it uses up to 20% of our energy _________. Most of this energy comes from carbohydrates that our body digests into glucose, or blood sugar. The frontal _____ are so sensitive to _____ in glucose, in fact, that a change in mental function is one of the primary signals of nutrient __________. Assuming that we are getting glucose regularly, how does the specific type of _____________ we eat affect our brains? Carbs come in three forms: starch, sugar, and fiber. While on most nutrition ______, they are all ______ into one total carb count, the ratio of the sugar and fiber subgroups to the whole amount affect how the body and brain respond. A high ________ food, like white bread, causes a rapid _______ of glucose into the blood, and then comes the dip. Blood sugar shoots down, and with it, our attention span and mood. On the other hand, oats, grains, and legumes have slower _______ release, enabling a steadier level of attentiveness. For sustained brain power, opting for a varied diet of nutrient-rich foods is ________. When it comes to what you bite, chew, and swallow, your choices have a direct and long-lasting ______ on the most ________ _____ in your body.

Solution

  1. labels
  2. chemical
  3. lumped
  4. conditions
  5. lobes
  6. critical
  7. resources
  8. neurons
  9. maintenance
  10. glucose
  11. compounds
  12. glycemic
  13. transform
  14. proteins
  15. helps
  16. brain
  17. alertness
  18. deficiency
  19. signals
  20. sucked
  21. organ
  22. carbohydrates
  23. simply
  24. nutrients
  25. release
  26. mental
  27. destroy
  28. vitamins
  29. foods
  30. drops
  31. health
  32. development
  33. efficiently
  34. skewed
  35. creation
  36. effects
  37. messengers
  38. powerful
  39. effect
  40. weight
  41. dehydrated

Original Text

Your Brain on Food If you sucked all of the moisture out of your brain and broke it down to its constituent nutritional content, what would it look like? Most of the weight of your dehydrated brain would come from fats, also known as lipids. In the remaining brain matter, you would find proteins and amino acids, traces of micronutrients, and glucose. The brain is, of course, more than just the sum of its nutritional parts, but each component does have a distinct impact on functioning, development, mood, and energy. So that post-lunch apathy, or late-night alertness you might be feeling, well, that could simply be the effects of food on your brain. Of the fats in your brain, the superstars are omegas 3 and 6. These essential fatty acids, which have been linked to preventing degenerative brain conditions, must come from our diets. So eating omega-rich foods, like nuts, seeds, and fatty fish, is crucial to the creation and maintenance of cell membranes. And while omegas are good fats for your brain, long-term consumption of other fats, like trans and saturated fats, may compromise brain health. Meanwhile, proteins and amino acids, the building block nutrients of growth and development, manipulate how we feel and behave. Amino acids contain the precursors to neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers that carry signals between neurons, affecting things like mood, sleep, attentiveness, and weight. They're one of the reasons we might feel calm after eating a large plate of pasta, or more alert after a protein-rich meal. The complex combinations of compounds in food can stimulate brain cells to release mood-altering norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. But getting to your brain cells is tricky, and amino acids have to compete for limited access. A diet with a range of foods helps maintain a balanced combination of brain messengers, and keeps your mood from getting skewed in one direction or the other. Like the other organs in our bodies, our brains also benefit from a steady supply of micronutrients. Antioxidants in fruits and vegetables strengthen the brain to fight off free radicals that destroy brain cells, enabling your brain to work well for a longer period of time. And without powerful micronutrients, like the vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid, our brains would be susceptible to brain disease and mental decline. Trace amounts of the minerals iron, copper, zinc, and sodium are also fundamental to brain health and early cognitive development. In order for the brain to efficiently transform and synthesize these valuable nutrients, it needs fuel, and lots of it. While the human brain only makes up about 2% of our body weight, it uses up to 20% of our energy resources. Most of this energy comes from carbohydrates that our body digests into glucose, or blood sugar. The frontal lobes are so sensitive to drops in glucose, in fact, that a change in mental function is one of the primary signals of nutrient deficiency. Assuming that we are getting glucose regularly, how does the specific type of carbohydrates we eat affect our brains? Carbs come in three forms: starch, sugar, and fiber. While on most nutrition labels, they are all lumped into one total carb count, the ratio of the sugar and fiber subgroups to the whole amount affect how the body and brain respond. A high glycemic food, like white bread, causes a rapid release of glucose into the blood, and then comes the dip. Blood sugar shoots down, and with it, our attention span and mood. On the other hand, oats, grains, and legumes have slower glucose release, enabling a steadier level of attentiveness. For sustained brain power, opting for a varied diet of nutrient-rich foods is critical. When it comes to what you bite, chew, and swallow, your choices have a direct and long-lasting effect on the most powerful organ in your body.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
brain health 2
amino acids 2
brain cells 2
blood sugar 2

Important Words

  1. access
  2. acid
  3. acids
  4. affect
  5. affecting
  6. alert
  7. alertness
  8. amino
  9. amount
  10. amounts
  11. antioxidants
  12. apathy
  13. assuming
  14. attention
  15. attentiveness
  16. balanced
  17. behave
  18. benefit
  19. bite
  20. block
  21. blood
  22. bodies
  23. body
  24. brain
  25. brains
  26. bread
  27. broke
  28. building
  29. calm
  30. carb
  31. carbohydrates
  32. carbs
  33. carry
  34. cell
  35. cells
  36. change
  37. chemical
  38. chew
  39. choices
  40. cognitive
  41. combination
  42. combinations
  43. compete
  44. complex
  45. component
  46. compounds
  47. compromise
  48. conditions
  49. constituent
  50. consumption
  51. content
  52. copper
  53. count
  54. creation
  55. critical
  56. crucial
  57. decline
  58. deficiency
  59. degenerative
  60. dehydrated
  61. destroy
  62. development
  63. diet
  64. diets
  65. digests
  66. dip
  67. direct
  68. direction
  69. disease
  70. distinct
  71. dopamine
  72. drops
  73. early
  74. eat
  75. eating
  76. effect
  77. effects
  78. efficiently
  79. enabling
  80. energy
  81. essential
  82. fact
  83. fats
  84. fatty
  85. feel
  86. feeling
  87. fiber
  88. fight
  89. find
  90. fish
  91. folic
  92. food
  93. foods
  94. free
  95. frontal
  96. fruits
  97. fuel
  98. function
  99. functioning
  100. fundamental
  101. glucose
  102. glycemic
  103. good
  104. grains
  105. growth
  106. hand
  107. health
  108. helps
  109. high
  110. human
  111. impact
  112. iron
  113. labels
  114. large
  115. legumes
  116. level
  117. limited
  118. linked
  119. lipids
  120. lobes
  121. longer
  122. lots
  123. lumped
  124. maintain
  125. maintenance
  126. manipulate
  127. matter
  128. meal
  129. membranes
  130. mental
  131. messengers
  132. micronutrients
  133. minerals
  134. moisture
  135. mood
  136. neurons
  137. neurotransmitters
  138. norepinephrine
  139. nutrient
  140. nutrients
  141. nutrition
  142. nutritional
  143. nuts
  144. oats
  145. omegas
  146. opting
  147. order
  148. organ
  149. organs
  150. parts
  151. pasta
  152. period
  153. plate
  154. power
  155. powerful
  156. precursors
  157. preventing
  158. primary
  159. proteins
  160. radicals
  161. range
  162. rapid
  163. ratio
  164. reasons
  165. regularly
  166. release
  167. remaining
  168. resources
  169. respond
  170. saturated
  171. seeds
  172. sensitive
  173. serotonin
  174. shoots
  175. signals
  176. simply
  177. skewed
  178. sleep
  179. slower
  180. sodium
  181. span
  182. specific
  183. starch
  184. steadier
  185. steady
  186. stimulate
  187. strengthen
  188. subgroups
  189. sucked
  190. sugar
  191. sum
  192. superstars
  193. supply
  194. susceptible
  195. sustained
  196. swallow
  197. synthesize
  198. time
  199. total
  200. trace
  201. traces
  202. trans
  203. transform
  204. tricky
  205. type
  206. valuable
  207. varied
  208. vegetables
  209. vitamins
  210. weight
  211. white
  212. work
  213. zinc