full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Nick Turner and Whitney Pennington Rodgers: How to fix two of the most broken systems in the US

Unscramble the Blue Letters

NT: I think the most important thing that we can do is to rnidefee what we think deelvirs safety and safety for whom. So we have this pretty simplistic notoin in this country. We grow up talking about bad guys and good guys, cops and robbers. We brand people as criminal for a certain act that they have ctetmmiod, as if that is the sum total of who they are. But the formula that we have basically been fed, and I think mostly have ingested and tend to embrace as a people, is that if you want safety, you have to have police and you have to have prosecutors and you have to put people in jail and prison. But the fact of the matter is, is that we as a country are quite unusual in that we use this, this criminal legal system, to respond to an arary of plremobs and challenges that people have that are really non-criminal. So I'll give you one statistic. Every year, about 10.5 million people are arrested in this country. So that's one every three sneodcs. So it just happened again. And it just haenpped again. And some people might be OK with that, and they think, "Well, you know, it's a violent cnuotry, there are a lot of guns out there." But when you look at statistics, one of the things that we see is that only five percent of those arrests are for violent cmrie. An 80 percent -- 80 percent -- so we're talking eight million of those arrests, which menas ppleoe going to jail, getting a record that's going to make it hard for them to get a job, are for conduct that's associated with poverty, homelessness, mental illsnes and substance use. And so we're isntnveig in this apparatus that sucks people into the system that isn't well adapted to address these complex problems, because many of these things are public health problems. Homelessness -- we should have supportive housing. Why would we lock someone up? If someone is dnaeomtcenipsg, would we rather have two people with side arms pop out of a car and address that situation, or we'd rather have a trained psoern who actually knows how to de-escalate and understands mental illness and connect that person to the right kind of system?

Open Cloze

NT: I think the most important thing that we can do is to ________ what we think ________ safety and safety for whom. So we have this pretty simplistic ______ in this country. We grow up talking about bad guys and good guys, cops and robbers. We brand people as criminal for a certain act that they have _________, as if that is the sum total of who they are. But the formula that we have basically been fed, and I think mostly have ingested and tend to embrace as a people, is that if you want safety, you have to have police and you have to have prosecutors and you have to put people in jail and prison. But the fact of the matter is, is that we as a country are quite unusual in that we use this, this criminal legal system, to respond to an _____ of ________ and challenges that people have that are really non-criminal. So I'll give you one statistic. Every year, about 10.5 million people are arrested in this country. So that's one every three _______. So it just happened again. And it just ________ again. And some people might be OK with that, and they think, "Well, you know, it's a violent _______, there are a lot of guns out there." But when you look at statistics, one of the things that we see is that only five percent of those arrests are for violent _____. An 80 percent -- 80 percent -- so we're talking eight million of those arrests, which _____ ______ going to jail, getting a record that's going to make it hard for them to get a job, are for conduct that's associated with poverty, homelessness, mental _______ and substance use. And so we're _________ in this apparatus that sucks people into the system that isn't well adapted to address these complex problems, because many of these things are public health problems. Homelessness -- we should have supportive housing. Why would we lock someone up? If someone is ______________, would we rather have two people with side arms pop out of a car and address that situation, or we'd rather have a trained ______ who actually knows how to de-escalate and understands mental illness and connect that person to the right kind of system?

Solution

  1. country
  2. illness
  3. redefine
  4. problems
  5. crime
  6. means
  7. array
  8. happened
  9. delivers
  10. decompensating
  11. notion
  12. person
  13. committed
  14. seconds
  15. investing
  16. people

Original Text

NT: I think the most important thing that we can do is to redefine what we think delivers safety and safety for whom. So we have this pretty simplistic notion in this country. We grow up talking about bad guys and good guys, cops and robbers. We brand people as criminal for a certain act that they have committed, as if that is the sum total of who they are. But the formula that we have basically been fed, and I think mostly have ingested and tend to embrace as a people, is that if you want safety, you have to have police and you have to have prosecutors and you have to put people in jail and prison. But the fact of the matter is, is that we as a country are quite unusual in that we use this, this criminal legal system, to respond to an array of problems and challenges that people have that are really non-criminal. So I'll give you one statistic. Every year, about 10.5 million people are arrested in this country. So that's one every three seconds. So it just happened again. And it just happened again. And some people might be OK with that, and they think, "Well, you know, it's a violent country, there are a lot of guns out there." But when you look at statistics, one of the things that we see is that only five percent of those arrests are for violent crime. An 80 percent -- 80 percent -- so we're talking eight million of those arrests, which means people going to jail, getting a record that's going to make it hard for them to get a job, are for conduct that's associated with poverty, homelessness, mental illness and substance use. And so we're investing in this apparatus that sucks people into the system that isn't well adapted to address these complex problems, because many of these things are public health problems. Homelessness -- we should have supportive housing. Why would we lock someone up? If someone is decompensating, would we rather have two people with side arms pop out of a car and address that situation, or we'd rather have a trained person who actually knows how to de-escalate and understands mental illness and connect that person to the right kind of system?

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
criminal legal 5
legal system 4
justice reform 3
immigration system 3
mass incarceration 3
public health 3
mental illness 3
criminal justice 2
justice system 2
family member 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
criminal legal system 4

Important Words

  1. act
  2. adapted
  3. address
  4. apparatus
  5. arms
  6. array
  7. arrested
  8. arrests
  9. bad
  10. basically
  11. brand
  12. car
  13. challenges
  14. committed
  15. complex
  16. conduct
  17. connect
  18. cops
  19. country
  20. crime
  21. criminal
  22. decompensating
  23. delivers
  24. embrace
  25. fact
  26. fed
  27. formula
  28. give
  29. good
  30. grow
  31. guns
  32. guys
  33. happened
  34. hard
  35. health
  36. homelessness
  37. housing
  38. illness
  39. important
  40. ingested
  41. investing
  42. jail
  43. job
  44. kind
  45. legal
  46. lock
  47. lot
  48. matter
  49. means
  50. mental
  51. million
  52. notion
  53. people
  54. percent
  55. person
  56. police
  57. pop
  58. poverty
  59. pretty
  60. prison
  61. problems
  62. prosecutors
  63. public
  64. put
  65. record
  66. redefine
  67. respond
  68. robbers
  69. safety
  70. seconds
  71. side
  72. simplistic
  73. situation
  74. statistic
  75. statistics
  76. substance
  77. sucks
  78. sum
  79. supportive
  80. system
  81. talking
  82. tend
  83. total
  84. trained
  85. understands
  86. unusual
  87. violent
  88. year