full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Anne Marie Albano: How to raise kids who can overcome anxiety

Unscramble the Blue Letters

sdiuets from my own lab and from colleagues around the world have shown a consistent trend: well-meaning parents are often inadvertently drawn into the cycle of axtniey. They give in, and they make too many accommodations for their child, and they let their children escape chanlingelg sitnuiatos. I want you to think about it like this: Your child comes into the hsuoe to you crying, in tears. They're five or six yraes of age. "Nobody at shoocl likes me! These kids are mean. No one would play with me." How do you feel seeing your cihld so upset? What do you do? The naurtal parenting instinct is to comfort that child, soothe them, protect them and fix the situation. Calling the teacher to intervene or the other parents to arrange playdates, that may be fine at age five. But what do you do if your child keeps coming home day after day in tears? Do you still fix things for them at age eight, 10, 14? For children, as they are developing, they invariably are going to be encountering challenging situations: seereopvls, oral reports, a challenging test that pops up, trying out for a sports team or a spot in the school play, conflicts with peers ... All these situations involve risk: risk of not doing well, not getting what they want, risk of maybe mnakig mistakes or being embarrassed.

Open Cloze

_______ from my own lab and from colleagues around the world have shown a consistent trend: well-meaning parents are often inadvertently drawn into the cycle of _______. They give in, and they make too many accommodations for their child, and they let their children escape ___________ __________. I want you to think about it like this: Your child comes into the _____ to you crying, in tears. They're five or six _____ of age. "Nobody at ______ likes me! These kids are mean. No one would play with me." How do you feel seeing your _____ so upset? What do you do? The _______ parenting instinct is to comfort that child, soothe them, protect them and fix the situation. Calling the teacher to intervene or the other parents to arrange playdates, that may be fine at age five. But what do you do if your child keeps coming home day after day in tears? Do you still fix things for them at age eight, 10, 14? For children, as they are developing, they invariably are going to be encountering challenging situations: __________, oral reports, a challenging test that pops up, trying out for a sports team or a spot in the school play, conflicts with peers ... All these situations involve risk: risk of not doing well, not getting what they want, risk of maybe ______ mistakes or being embarrassed.

Solution

  1. years
  2. anxiety
  3. natural
  4. situations
  5. school
  6. sleepovers
  7. challenging
  8. making
  9. house
  10. studies
  11. child

Original Text

Studies from my own lab and from colleagues around the world have shown a consistent trend: well-meaning parents are often inadvertently drawn into the cycle of anxiety. They give in, and they make too many accommodations for their child, and they let their children escape challenging situations. I want you to think about it like this: Your child comes into the house to you crying, in tears. They're five or six years of age. "Nobody at school likes me! These kids are mean. No one would play with me." How do you feel seeing your child so upset? What do you do? The natural parenting instinct is to comfort that child, soothe them, protect them and fix the situation. Calling the teacher to intervene or the other parents to arrange playdates, that may be fine at age five. But what do you do if your child keeps coming home day after day in tears? Do you still fix things for them at age eight, 10, 14? For children, as they are developing, they invariably are going to be encountering challenging situations: sleepovers, oral reports, a challenging test that pops up, trying out for a sports team or a spot in the school play, conflicts with peers ... All these situations involve risk: risk of not doing well, not getting what they want, risk of maybe making mistakes or being embarrassed.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
staten island 3
excessive anxiety 3
anxiety disorders 2
cognitive behavioral 2
challenging situations 2
natural parenting 2
parenting instinct 2
repeated exposure 2
coping mechanisms 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
natural parenting instinct 2

Important Words

  1. accommodations
  2. age
  3. anxiety
  4. arrange
  5. calling
  6. challenging
  7. child
  8. children
  9. colleagues
  10. comfort
  11. coming
  12. conflicts
  13. consistent
  14. crying
  15. cycle
  16. day
  17. developing
  18. drawn
  19. embarrassed
  20. encountering
  21. escape
  22. feel
  23. fine
  24. fix
  25. give
  26. home
  27. house
  28. inadvertently
  29. instinct
  30. intervene
  31. invariably
  32. involve
  33. kids
  34. lab
  35. likes
  36. making
  37. mistakes
  38. natural
  39. oral
  40. parenting
  41. parents
  42. peers
  43. play
  44. playdates
  45. pops
  46. protect
  47. reports
  48. risk
  49. school
  50. shown
  51. situation
  52. situations
  53. sleepovers
  54. soothe
  55. sports
  56. spot
  57. studies
  58. teacher
  59. team
  60. tears
  61. test
  62. upset
  63. world
  64. years