full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Wes Moore: How to talk to veterans about war

Unscramble the Blue Letters

I rmbeeemr when I came back, I wanted to talk to people. I wanted people to ask me about my experiences. I wanted people to come up to me and tell me, "What did you do?" I wanted people to come up to me and tell me, "What was it like? What was the food like? What was the experience like? How are you doing?" And the only questions I got from people was, "Did you shoot anybody?" And those were the ones who were even cuoiurs enough to say anything. Because sometimes there's this fear and there's this aiernsheppon that if I say anything, I'm afraid I'll offend, or I'm afraid I'll trigger something, so the common default is just saying nothing. The problem with that is then it flees like your service was not even acknowledged, like no one even cared. "Thank you for your service," and we move on. What I wanted to better understand was what's behind that, and why "thank you for your service" isn't enough. The fact is, we have literally 2.6 million men and women who are veterans of Iraq or Afghanistan who are all amongst us. Sometimes we know who they are, sometimes we don't, but there is that feeling, the shared experience, the sarhed bond where we know that that erexipence and that cethapr of our life, while it might be closed, it's still not over.

Open Cloze

I ________ when I came back, I wanted to talk to people. I wanted people to ask me about my experiences. I wanted people to come up to me and tell me, "What did you do?" I wanted people to come up to me and tell me, "What was it like? What was the food like? What was the experience like? How are you doing?" And the only questions I got from people was, "Did you shoot anybody?" And those were the ones who were even _______ enough to say anything. Because sometimes there's this fear and there's this ____________ that if I say anything, I'm afraid I'll offend, or I'm afraid I'll trigger something, so the common default is just saying nothing. The problem with that is then it _____ like your service was not even acknowledged, like no one even cared. "Thank you for your service," and we move on. What I wanted to better understand was what's behind that, and why "thank you for your service" isn't enough. The fact is, we have literally 2.6 million men and women who are veterans of Iraq or Afghanistan who are all amongst us. Sometimes we know who they are, sometimes we don't, but there is that feeling, the shared experience, the ______ bond where we know that that __________ and that _______ of our life, while it might be closed, it's still not over.

Solution

  1. apprehension
  2. curious
  3. shared
  4. chapter
  5. remember
  6. experience
  7. feels

Original Text

I remember when I came back, I wanted to talk to people. I wanted people to ask me about my experiences. I wanted people to come up to me and tell me, "What did you do?" I wanted people to come up to me and tell me, "What was it like? What was the food like? What was the experience like? How are you doing?" And the only questions I got from people was, "Did you shoot anybody?" And those were the ones who were even curious enough to say anything. Because sometimes there's this fear and there's this apprehension that if I say anything, I'm afraid I'll offend, or I'm afraid I'll trigger something, so the common default is just saying nothing. The problem with that is then it feels like your service was not even acknowledged, like no one even cared. "Thank you for your service," and we move on. What I wanted to better understand was what's behind that, and why "thank you for your service" isn't enough. The fact is, we have literally 2.6 million men and women who are veterans of Iraq or Afghanistan who are all amongst us. Sometimes we know who they are, sometimes we don't, but there is that feeling, the shared experience, the shared bond where we know that that experience and that chapter of our life, while it might be closed, it's still not over.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
couple years 3
wanted people 3
military school 2
black gates 2
united states 2
army officer 2
heading overseas 2
vast majority 2
entire time 2
percent light 2
means acknowledging 2

Important Words

  1. acknowledged
  2. afghanistan
  3. afraid
  4. apprehension
  5. bond
  6. cared
  7. chapter
  8. closed
  9. common
  10. curious
  11. default
  12. experience
  13. experiences
  14. fact
  15. fear
  16. feeling
  17. feels
  18. food
  19. iraq
  20. life
  21. literally
  22. men
  23. million
  24. move
  25. offend
  26. people
  27. problem
  28. questions
  29. remember
  30. service
  31. shared
  32. shoot
  33. talk
  34. trigger
  35. understand
  36. veterans
  37. wanted
  38. women