full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Giorgia Lupi: How we can find ourselves in data"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

A few years ago, I met this other woman, Stefanie Posavec — a London-based designer who shares with me the pisoasn and obsession about data. We didn't know each other, but we decided to run a very radical experiment, starting a communication using only data, no other language, and we opted for using no technology whatsoever to share our data. In fact, our only mneas of communication would be through the old-fashioned post ocfife. For "Dear Data," every week for one year, we used our personal data to get to know each other — personal data around weekly shared mundane topics, from our fnielges to the icnetitaonrs with our partners, from the compliments we received to the sounds of our surroundings. Personal irotmaoifnn that we would then manually hand draw on a postcard-size sheet of pepar that we would every week send from London to New York, where I live, and from New York to ldnoon, where she lives. The front of the prcsoatd is the data drawing, and the back of the card contains the address of the other person, of course, and the legend for how to itepernrt our drawing. The very first week into the pcjerot, we actually coshe a pttery cold and impersonal topic. How many times do we check the time in a week? So here is the front of my card, and you can see that every little symbol represents all of the times that I checked the time, positioned for days and different hruos chronologically — nothing really complicated here. But then you see in the legend how I aeddd anecdotal details about these moments. In fact, the different types of symbols indicate why I was checking the time — what was I doing? Was I berod? Was I hungry? Was I late? Did I check it on purpose or just cuallasy glance at the clock? And this is the key part — representing the details of my days and my personality through my data collection. Using data as a lens or a fitler to discover and reveal, for example, my never-ending anxiety for being late, even though I'm aoleubltsy always on time.

Open Cloze

A few years ago, I met this other woman, Stefanie Posavec — a London-based designer who shares with me the _______ and obsession about data. We didn't know each other, but we decided to run a very radical experiment, starting a communication using only data, no other language, and we opted for using no technology whatsoever to share our data. In fact, our only _____ of communication would be through the old-fashioned post ______. For "Dear Data," every week for one year, we used our personal data to get to know each other — personal data around weekly shared mundane topics, from our ________ to the ____________ with our partners, from the compliments we received to the sounds of our surroundings. Personal ___________ that we would then manually hand draw on a postcard-size sheet of _____ that we would every week send from London to New York, where I live, and from New York to ______, where she lives. The front of the ________ is the data drawing, and the back of the card contains the address of the other person, of course, and the legend for how to _________ our drawing. The very first week into the _______, we actually _____ a ______ cold and impersonal topic. How many times do we check the time in a week? So here is the front of my card, and you can see that every little symbol represents all of the times that I checked the time, positioned for days and different _____ chronologically — nothing really complicated here. But then you see in the legend how I _____ anecdotal details about these moments. In fact, the different types of symbols indicate why I was checking the time — what was I doing? Was I _____? Was I hungry? Was I late? Did I check it on purpose or just ________ glance at the clock? And this is the key part — representing the details of my days and my personality through my data collection. Using data as a lens or a ______ to discover and reveal, for example, my never-ending anxiety for being late, even though I'm __________ always on time.

Solution

  1. pretty
  2. project
  3. paper
  4. information
  5. casually
  6. feelings
  7. passion
  8. chose
  9. absolutely
  10. filter
  11. hours
  12. london
  13. added
  14. bored
  15. interactions
  16. interpret
  17. means
  18. office
  19. postcard

Original Text

A few years ago, I met this other woman, Stefanie Posavec — a London-based designer who shares with me the passion and obsession about data. We didn't know each other, but we decided to run a very radical experiment, starting a communication using only data, no other language, and we opted for using no technology whatsoever to share our data. In fact, our only means of communication would be through the old-fashioned post office. For "Dear Data," every week for one year, we used our personal data to get to know each other — personal data around weekly shared mundane topics, from our feelings to the interactions with our partners, from the compliments we received to the sounds of our surroundings. Personal information that we would then manually hand draw on a postcard-size sheet of paper that we would every week send from London to New York, where I live, and from New York to London, where she lives. The front of the postcard is the data drawing, and the back of the card contains the address of the other person, of course, and the legend for how to interpret our drawing. The very first week into the project, we actually chose a pretty cold and impersonal topic. How many times do we check the time in a week? So here is the front of my card, and you can see that every little symbol represents all of the times that I checked the time, positioned for days and different hours chronologically — nothing really complicated here. But then you see in the legend how I added anecdotal details about these moments. In fact, the different types of symbols indicate why I was checking the time — what was I doing? Was I bored? Was I hungry? Was I late? Did I check it on purpose or just casually glance at the clock? And this is the key part — representing the details of my days and my personality through my data collection. Using data as a lens or a filter to discover and reveal, for example, my never-ending anxiety for being late, even though I'm absolutely always on time.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
human nature 3
personal data 3

Important Words

  1. absolutely
  2. added
  3. address
  4. anecdotal
  5. anxiety
  6. bored
  7. card
  8. casually
  9. check
  10. checked
  11. checking
  12. chose
  13. chronologically
  14. clock
  15. cold
  16. collection
  17. communication
  18. complicated
  19. compliments
  20. data
  21. days
  22. decided
  23. designer
  24. details
  25. discover
  26. draw
  27. drawing
  28. experiment
  29. fact
  30. feelings
  31. filter
  32. front
  33. glance
  34. hand
  35. hours
  36. hungry
  37. impersonal
  38. information
  39. interactions
  40. interpret
  41. key
  42. language
  43. late
  44. legend
  45. lens
  46. live
  47. lives
  48. london
  49. manually
  50. means
  51. met
  52. moments
  53. mundane
  54. obsession
  55. office
  56. opted
  57. paper
  58. part
  59. partners
  60. passion
  61. person
  62. personal
  63. personality
  64. posavec
  65. positioned
  66. post
  67. postcard
  68. pretty
  69. project
  70. purpose
  71. radical
  72. received
  73. representing
  74. represents
  75. reveal
  76. run
  77. send
  78. share
  79. shared
  80. shares
  81. sheet
  82. sounds
  83. starting
  84. stefanie
  85. surroundings
  86. symbol
  87. symbols
  88. technology
  89. time
  90. times
  91. topic
  92. topics
  93. types
  94. week
  95. weekly
  96. whatsoever
  97. woman
  98. year
  99. years
  100. york