full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Esta Soler: How we turned the tide on domestic violence (Hint

Unscramble the Blue Letters

But we were still msinsig a critical element. So, step four: We needed to engage men. We couldn't sovle this problem with 50 perecnt of the population on the sidelines. And I already told you I'm a data nerd. natniaol polling told us that men felt intidced and not invited into this conversation. So we wondered, how can we include men? How can we get men to talk about violence against women and girls? And a male friend of mine pulled me aside and he said, "You want men to talk about violence against women and grlis. Men don't talk." (Laughter) I agopoizle to the men in the audience. I know you do. But he said, "Do you know what they do do? They do talk to their kids. They talk to their kids as pntreas, as coaches." And that's what we did. We met men where they were at and we built a program. And then we had this one enevt that stays in my heart forever where a basketball ccoah was taiklng to a room fileld with male athletes and men from all walks of life. And he was talking about the iprcntmaoe of coaching boys into men and cgnihnag the culture of the lkceor room and giving men the tools to have healthy relationships. And all of a sudden, he looked at the back of the room, and he saw his dutehagr, and he called out his daughter's name, Michaela, and he said, "Michaela, come up here." And she's nine years old, and she was kind of shy, and she got up there, and he said, "Sit down next to me." She sat right down next to him. He gave her this big hug, and he said, "People ask me why I do this work. I do this work because I'm her dad, and I don't want anyone ever to hurt her." And as a parent, I get it. I get it, knowing that there are so many sexual assaults on college campuses that are so widespread and so under-reported. We've done a lot for aludt women. We've got to do a better job for our kids. We just do. We have to. (Applause)

Open Cloze

But we were still _______ a critical element. So, step four: We needed to engage men. We couldn't _____ this problem with 50 _______ of the population on the sidelines. And I already told you I'm a data nerd. ________ polling told us that men felt ________ and not invited into this conversation. So we wondered, how can we include men? How can we get men to talk about violence against women and girls? And a male friend of mine pulled me aside and he said, "You want men to talk about violence against women and _____. Men don't talk." (Laughter) I _________ to the men in the audience. I know you do. But he said, "Do you know what they do do? They do talk to their kids. They talk to their kids as _______, as coaches." And that's what we did. We met men where they were at and we built a program. And then we had this one _____ that stays in my heart forever where a basketball _____ was _______ to a room ______ with male athletes and men from all walks of life. And he was talking about the __________ of coaching boys into men and ________ the culture of the ______ room and giving men the tools to have healthy relationships. And all of a sudden, he looked at the back of the room, and he saw his ________, and he called out his daughter's name, Michaela, and he said, "Michaela, come up here." And she's nine years old, and she was kind of shy, and she got up there, and he said, "Sit down next to me." She sat right down next to him. He gave her this big hug, and he said, "People ask me why I do this work. I do this work because I'm her dad, and I don't want anyone ever to hurt her." And as a parent, I get it. I get it, knowing that there are so many sexual assaults on college campuses that are so widespread and so under-reported. We've done a lot for _____ women. We've got to do a better job for our kids. We just do. We have to. (Applause)

Solution

  1. locker
  2. filled
  3. indicted
  4. changing
  5. percent
  6. national
  7. girls
  8. apologize
  9. talking
  10. daughter
  11. event
  12. missing
  13. parents
  14. adult
  15. solve
  16. coach
  17. importance

Original Text

But we were still missing a critical element. So, step four: We needed to engage men. We couldn't solve this problem with 50 percent of the population on the sidelines. And I already told you I'm a data nerd. National polling told us that men felt indicted and not invited into this conversation. So we wondered, how can we include men? How can we get men to talk about violence against women and girls? And a male friend of mine pulled me aside and he said, "You want men to talk about violence against women and girls. Men don't talk." (Laughter) I apologize to the men in the audience. I know you do. But he said, "Do you know what they do do? They do talk to their kids. They talk to their kids as parents, as coaches." And that's what we did. We met men where they were at and we built a program. And then we had this one event that stays in my heart forever where a basketball coach was talking to a room filled with male athletes and men from all walks of life. And he was talking about the importance of coaching boys into men and changing the culture of the locker room and giving men the tools to have healthy relationships. And all of a sudden, he looked at the back of the room, and he saw his daughter, and he called out his daughter's name, Michaela, and he said, "Michaela, come up here." And she's nine years old, and she was kind of shy, and she got up there, and he said, "Sit down next to me." She sat right down next to him. He gave her this big hug, and he said, "People ask me why I do this work. I do this work because I'm her dad, and I don't want anyone ever to hurt her." And as a parent, I get it. I get it, knowing that there are so many sexual assaults on college campuses that are so widespread and so under-reported. We've done a lot for adult women. We've got to do a better job for our kids. We just do. We have to. (Applause)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
domestic violence 4
adult women 2
step number 2
important piece 2
marriage act 2
data nerd 2
public education 2
education campaign 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
public education campaign 2

Important Words

  1. adult
  2. apologize
  3. applause
  4. assaults
  5. athletes
  6. audience
  7. basketball
  8. big
  9. boys
  10. built
  11. called
  12. campuses
  13. changing
  14. coach
  15. coaches
  16. coaching
  17. college
  18. conversation
  19. critical
  20. culture
  21. dad
  22. data
  23. daughter
  24. element
  25. engage
  26. event
  27. felt
  28. filled
  29. friend
  30. gave
  31. girls
  32. giving
  33. healthy
  34. heart
  35. hug
  36. hurt
  37. importance
  38. include
  39. indicted
  40. invited
  41. job
  42. kids
  43. kind
  44. knowing
  45. laughter
  46. life
  47. locker
  48. looked
  49. lot
  50. male
  51. men
  52. met
  53. michaela
  54. missing
  55. national
  56. needed
  57. nerd
  58. parent
  59. parents
  60. percent
  61. polling
  62. population
  63. problem
  64. program
  65. pulled
  66. relationships
  67. room
  68. sat
  69. sexual
  70. shy
  71. sidelines
  72. solve
  73. stays
  74. step
  75. sudden
  76. talk
  77. talking
  78. told
  79. tools
  80. violence
  81. walks
  82. widespread
  83. women
  84. wondered
  85. work
  86. years