full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Kate Wagner: I hate McMansions -- and you should too"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

First of all, I'd like to apologize to anyone in the room who considers themselves to be architecturally sensitive. What you're about to see may upset you. So, the number one question I get in my inbox all the time is, so McMansion hell, what the hell is McMansion? So, it's pretty easy. I've narrowed it down to a cloupe of factors. First of all, they are oversized. That means there's over 3,000 square feet which is 500 feet more than the highest national hnusiog avargee. So, AKA that space, as you can see here probably 26 children. (Laughter) And the other thing is, if you look at this house, which is quite lovely, (Laughter) I'm sorry. This house probably has three mieda rooms, seven bathrooms with a greadn tub, and a cnielhader and whatever, but it doesn't have a front pocrh and I cannot find the front door. (Laughter) Also there's no lawn So, that leads to my second point, they are poorly designed. So, that means there's no rscepet for form or scale or other things that people in the architecture would call 'the bsaic rules of architecture.' So, as you can see here, this house looks like it was designed by someone who maybe saw a house once in their life, but either had some sort of visual isuess or was wearing kaleidoscope glasses that you get during Halloween. Even worse these poorly designed heusos are cheaply cerctustnod. So, I will get to that in a second. But, I'd like to point out that this is an engineering marvel. This is a house that is a wood frame covered in different tpeys of foam. (Laughter) So, and finally, they are dtecpuirfessl. (lgaeuhtr) So, you have to feel really bad for the poor folks in these little houses who on longer have any natural light in their homes. It is a dark time for them as it is for all of us. So, basically they are fundamentally bad architecture. Now, even though I'm dressed impeccably well, I'm not the gatekeeper of what is and is not good aesthetic architecture. But, we've been talking about these things in architectural history for thousands of yaers starting with Vitruvius, the great-great-great -granddaddy of architecture. Sorry art history majors, this is going to be boring. So, Vitruvius said that architecture should be three things, right? It should be durable, it should be useful or focntaniul, and it should be beautiful. And McMansions are well, you know, none of these things. So, let's start with durable. So, through most of human history houses were built to last generations, that maens that you were born in the house, had kids in your house, died in your house, and then your kids had kids in your house and died in your house. AKA, they were permanent. That cahnged in the 1980s with access to cpheear construction methods and mrteiaals and also in deregulation economies, etc, cnsuiag a huge housing bubble, right? That we all know of. And basically these houses weren't built to last 15 years, because they were bliut to have the most amnuot of space for the lowest price, and people didn't really care about how long they'd last anyway because they were going to live there for maybe six years, maybe less because they were going to flip that house and make, like, a million dollars. A million dollars. (Laughter) And they would be on the next house before you ever knew it, so it was not their problem anymore, but we all know how that ended. So that brings me to another part of durability- they are not aesthetically daruble. That means that certain house dingses like you know, you have the box, and the box has a roof and the roof looks like this, and this is the house that every child draws, this is your idea of the house. These houses, of course, as you can see in this case, this is a house that is got water damage, and the balconies don't lay anywhere, you can actually go out open those doros, you will fall into your yard. (Laughter) These were just trends. People saw stuff like this on TV and said, "I want that on my house." And so they're not really aesthetically durable because they were built on these trends, and when the tnreds ran out, they would be onto the third house or the fourth house because they were flipping and making millions of dollras. So, according to 'Bloomberg Now,' these houses aren't selling well. And houses that are smaller, you know, like normal people houses, built for normal people not gnait cars to live in, are aienciaptrpg are at a much higher and faster rate. And so we are gonna move on to useful. What does it mean for house to be useful? So there are primary uses for a house. One is to keep us, you know, out of the eeeltnms. Like you saw in the last example, it's not doing a good job of that with the wetar damage in the missing deck. Oh, skepaing of the elements, imaging trying to heat and cool that house. So you can't even stay warm or cool without spending millions of dollars. (Laughter) But most of all, a house is suppose to be our home. It's a place for our sctnarauy, community, and being one with our fiilames. And in a space that is designed where everyone has their own room, and their own living room, and their own dninig room, and their own pool table? You don't have to irtnecat with any members of your family. So trust me I would have loevd that in the seventh grade. But I think most of us are the well-adjusted people that we are, because we've had to fight with our siglbnis in our parents, and all these things that come from living in a smaller-knit space. And when you rob that sense of community from our heoms, what real puropse do they have? But McMansions ignore both of these purposes to fuocs on a new purpose, and that purpose was the husoe is an asset, the house was now becoming through sereis of, you know, deregulatory eoomicnc policies, etc, a liquid asest, it was money, it was no lnoegr a place to live, and it was seperated from the sense of place and space that we know and consider our homes, and so beautiful. McMansions don't follow the rules of traditional architecture, but really love to use the icons and the symbols, and shapes of the traditional architecture like columns in windows styles, and the box with the roof, though the roof is three tiems as big as the box. And in this case, you can see none of the windows actually match. Some have muntains which is the bits that separate the panes of glass, and some don't, and most of all it looks like it is a screaming animal. (Laughter) So, there's no regard for basic matching, sacle, you know, the rules of arrchctutiee, because they were degiensd mostly from the inside out, and mommy really ndeeed her cathedral cilenigs in the broohtam. You know sometimes that meant you had a roof on that lkoeod like this. Okay what's the point, right? Why do I even care about McMansions if they are so horrible, and why do I write about them? Well, it's about education. 60 percent of people according to the U.S. census bureau live in the sbruubs, and not all of us have access to the farbic of our cities that have buildings from different eras, and all their beautiful details, all interwoven into an urban fabric. Most of us have to live with, you know, McMansions. And so it's about teaching with what you have, and also they're politically charged. They're sort of the poster child of the recession, and they are attached to cnpcteos like urbanism and sianiialubttsy and other things that make up a better wrold. You might be still asking, "Okay, well, why not talk about you know good architecture?" Well why so negative? I started writing about architecture in high school to defend buildings like this. This is the Goshen Government Centre by Paul Rudolph, in Goshen, New York which is undergoing, what I like to call 'a murder.' (Laughter). I discovered, in the fight for preservation of late modernist and post-modernist architecture which is the part that I like, if you were on the side of "I don't like this," you have the advantage. People say, "Oh, I like this", and like okay, but if you say, "I don't like this," then like why? And if you don't know why you're pretty a jerk and so but that gets people tailkng and starts a disscusion and so in moaiscnmn hell I saw this opportunity to elropxe, because a lof people hate McMansions but they have no idea why. They're like, "I hate that, it's big and it's ugly!", but they don't know what is so ugly about it or why it seems so big, and that's sort of where I come in, and it brings me to my final point. It's about the greater purpose. So my professor at Peabody where I study acoustics has this saying that says, "The first step to good design is ainovidg the bad, then you can design the good, and the first step to avoiding the bad is recognizing the bad." It's about looking at the world through a critical eye, and the best part about being snarky is that you are automatically critical. And so pelpoe can say, avoiding the bad, right? You don't want a house thet looks like the ginormous thing that's on the screen here. This is literally the McMansion, it is a house that someone took to their little mouth and blew up into a balloon. It's like they took the nice house with the cable and (Puffs) Now if you know I don't like that, and here's why I don't like that then I can start thinking about encouraging other people and eadnctuig them about why I don't like that and they don't like that. And maybe through this sort of education and design, getting people who don't care about design to talk about dsgien is another really huge step in paineueptrtg better design. And so through using America's ugliest and most hated houses, I mean, I'm sorry. We can... (Laughter) In talking about them in a way that introduces humor so it's not, "I'm shoving my good design down your throat, dang you!" We can encourage people through discussion, through education, through empowerment, to be a greater force for change, and a change towards a more beautiful, a more sustainable, a more ilsinvcue, and you know, a better-looking world. (Laughter) Or at least, prevent them from building more McMansions. Thank you! (Applause)

Open Cloze

First of all, I'd like to apologize to anyone in the room who considers themselves to be architecturally sensitive. What you're about to see may upset you. So, the number one question I get in my inbox all the time is, so McMansion hell, what the hell is McMansion? So, it's pretty easy. I've narrowed it down to a ______ of factors. First of all, they are oversized. That means there's over 3,000 square feet which is 500 feet more than the highest national _______ _______. So, AKA that space, as you can see here probably 26 children. (Laughter) And the other thing is, if you look at this house, which is quite lovely, (Laughter) I'm sorry. This house probably has three _____ rooms, seven bathrooms with a ______ tub, and a __________ and whatever, but it doesn't have a front _____ and I cannot find the front door. (Laughter) Also there's no lawn So, that leads to my second point, they are poorly designed. So, that means there's no _______ for form or scale or other things that people in the architecture would call 'the _____ rules of architecture.' So, as you can see here, this house looks like it was designed by someone who maybe saw a house once in their life, but either had some sort of visual ______ or was wearing kaleidoscope glasses that you get during Halloween. Even worse these poorly designed ______ are cheaply ___________. So, I will get to that in a second. But, I'd like to point out that this is an engineering marvel. This is a house that is a wood frame covered in different _____ of foam. (Laughter) So, and finally, they are _____________. (________) So, you have to feel really bad for the poor folks in these little houses who on longer have any natural light in their homes. It is a dark time for them as it is for all of us. So, basically they are fundamentally bad architecture. Now, even though I'm dressed impeccably well, I'm not the gatekeeper of what is and is not good aesthetic architecture. But, we've been talking about these things in architectural history for thousands of _____ starting with Vitruvius, the great-great-great -granddaddy of architecture. Sorry art history majors, this is going to be boring. So, Vitruvius said that architecture should be three things, right? It should be durable, it should be useful or __________, and it should be beautiful. And McMansions are well, you know, none of these things. So, let's start with durable. So, through most of human history houses were built to last generations, that _____ that you were born in the house, had kids in your house, died in your house, and then your kids had kids in your house and died in your house. AKA, they were permanent. That _______ in the 1980s with access to _______ construction methods and _________ and also in deregulation economies, etc, _______ a huge housing bubble, right? That we all know of. And basically these houses weren't built to last 15 years, because they were _____ to have the most ______ of space for the lowest price, and people didn't really care about how long they'd last anyway because they were going to live there for maybe six years, maybe less because they were going to flip that house and make, like, a million dollars. A million dollars. (Laughter) And they would be on the next house before you ever knew it, so it was not their problem anymore, but we all know how that ended. So that brings me to another part of durability- they are not aesthetically _______. That means that certain house _______ like you know, you have the box, and the box has a roof and the roof looks like this, and this is the house that every child draws, this is your idea of the house. These houses, of course, as you can see in this case, this is a house that is got water damage, and the balconies don't lay anywhere, you can actually go out open those _____, you will fall into your yard. (Laughter) These were just trends. People saw stuff like this on TV and said, "I want that on my house." And so they're not really aesthetically durable because they were built on these trends, and when the ______ ran out, they would be onto the third house or the fourth house because they were flipping and making millions of _______. So, according to 'Bloomberg Now,' these houses aren't selling well. And houses that are smaller, you know, like normal people houses, built for normal people not _____ cars to live in, are ____________ are at a much higher and faster rate. And so we are gonna move on to useful. What does it mean for house to be useful? So there are primary uses for a house. One is to keep us, you know, out of the ________. Like you saw in the last example, it's not doing a good job of that with the _____ damage in the missing deck. Oh, ________ of the elements, imaging trying to heat and cool that house. So you can't even stay warm or cool without spending millions of dollars. (Laughter) But most of all, a house is suppose to be our home. It's a place for our _________, community, and being one with our ________. And in a space that is designed where everyone has their own room, and their own living room, and their own ______ room, and their own pool table? You don't have to ________ with any members of your family. So trust me I would have _____ that in the seventh grade. But I think most of us are the well-adjusted people that we are, because we've had to fight with our ________ in our parents, and all these things that come from living in a smaller-knit space. And when you rob that sense of community from our _____, what real _______ do they have? But McMansions ignore both of these purposes to _____ on a new purpose, and that purpose was the _____ is an asset, the house was now becoming through ______ of, you know, deregulatory ________ policies, etc, a liquid _____, it was money, it was no ______ a place to live, and it was seperated from the sense of place and space that we know and consider our homes, and so beautiful. McMansions don't follow the rules of traditional architecture, but really love to use the icons and the symbols, and shapes of the traditional architecture like columns in windows styles, and the box with the roof, though the roof is three _____ as big as the box. And in this case, you can see none of the windows actually match. Some have muntains which is the bits that separate the panes of glass, and some don't, and most of all it looks like it is a screaming animal. (Laughter) So, there's no regard for basic matching, _____, you know, the rules of ____________, because they were ________ mostly from the inside out, and mommy really ______ her cathedral ________ in the ________. You know sometimes that meant you had a roof on that ______ like this. Okay what's the point, right? Why do I even care about McMansions if they are so horrible, and why do I write about them? Well, it's about education. 60 percent of people according to the U.S. census bureau live in the _______, and not all of us have access to the ______ of our cities that have buildings from different eras, and all their beautiful details, all interwoven into an urban fabric. Most of us have to live with, you know, McMansions. And so it's about teaching with what you have, and also they're politically charged. They're sort of the poster child of the recession, and they are attached to ________ like urbanism and ______________ and other things that make up a better _____. You might be still asking, "Okay, well, why not talk about you know good architecture?" Well why so negative? I started writing about architecture in high school to defend buildings like this. This is the Goshen Government Centre by Paul Rudolph, in Goshen, New York which is undergoing, what I like to call 'a murder.' (Laughter). I discovered, in the fight for preservation of late modernist and post-modernist architecture which is the part that I like, if you were on the side of "I don't like this," you have the advantage. People say, "Oh, I like this", and like okay, but if you say, "I don't like this," then like why? And if you don't know why you're pretty a jerk and so but that gets people _______ and starts a disscusion and so in _________ hell I saw this opportunity to _______, because a lof people hate McMansions but they have no idea why. They're like, "I hate that, it's big and it's ugly!", but they don't know what is so ugly about it or why it seems so big, and that's sort of where I come in, and it brings me to my final point. It's about the greater purpose. So my professor at Peabody where I study acoustics has this saying that says, "The first step to good design is ________ the bad, then you can design the good, and the first step to avoiding the bad is recognizing the bad." It's about looking at the world through a critical eye, and the best part about being snarky is that you are automatically critical. And so ______ can say, avoiding the bad, right? You don't want a house thet looks like the ginormous thing that's on the screen here. This is literally the McMansion, it is a house that someone took to their little mouth and blew up into a balloon. It's like they took the nice house with the cable and (Puffs) Now if you know I don't like that, and here's why I don't like that then I can start thinking about encouraging other people and _________ them about why I don't like that and they don't like that. And maybe through this sort of education and design, getting people who don't care about design to talk about ______ is another really huge step in ____________ better design. And so through using America's ugliest and most hated houses, I mean, I'm sorry. We can... (Laughter) In talking about them in a way that introduces humor so it's not, "I'm shoving my good design down your throat, dang you!" We can encourage people through discussion, through education, through empowerment, to be a greater force for change, and a change towards a more beautiful, a more sustainable, a more _________, and you know, a better-looking world. (Laughter) Or at least, prevent them from building more McMansions. Thank you! (Applause)

Solution

  1. sanctuary
  2. functional
  3. people
  4. house
  5. focus
  6. inclusive
  7. years
  8. talking
  9. trends
  10. economic
  11. design
  12. respect
  13. perpetuating
  14. appreciating
  15. issues
  16. constructed
  17. dining
  18. giant
  19. scale
  20. built
  21. needed
  22. media
  23. durable
  24. porch
  25. suburbs
  26. loved
  27. causing
  28. asset
  29. doors
  30. series
  31. siblings
  32. speaking
  33. housing
  34. designs
  35. elements
  36. families
  37. garden
  38. disrespectful
  39. means
  40. couple
  41. basic
  42. bathroom
  43. cheaper
  44. water
  45. houses
  46. explore
  47. designed
  48. world
  49. types
  50. fabric
  51. chandelier
  52. homes
  53. mcmansion
  54. longer
  55. educating
  56. avoiding
  57. average
  58. changed
  59. sustainability
  60. times
  61. looked
  62. dollars
  63. amount
  64. materials
  65. ceilings
  66. architecture
  67. concepts
  68. laughter
  69. interact
  70. purpose

Original Text

First of all, I'd like to apologize to anyone in the room who considers themselves to be architecturally sensitive. What you're about to see may upset you. So, the number one question I get in my inbox all the time is, so McMansion hell, what the hell is McMansion? So, it's pretty easy. I've narrowed it down to a couple of factors. First of all, they are oversized. That means there's over 3,000 square feet which is 500 feet more than the highest national housing average. So, AKA that space, as you can see here probably 26 children. (Laughter) And the other thing is, if you look at this house, which is quite lovely, (Laughter) I'm sorry. This house probably has three media rooms, seven bathrooms with a garden tub, and a chandelier and whatever, but it doesn't have a front porch and I cannot find the front door. (Laughter) Also there's no lawn So, that leads to my second point, they are poorly designed. So, that means there's no respect for form or scale or other things that people in the architecture would call 'the basic rules of architecture.' So, as you can see here, this house looks like it was designed by someone who maybe saw a house once in their life, but either had some sort of visual issues or was wearing kaleidoscope glasses that you get during Halloween. Even worse these poorly designed houses are cheaply constructed. So, I will get to that in a second. But, I'd like to point out that this is an engineering marvel. This is a house that is a wood frame covered in different types of foam. (Laughter) So, and finally, they are disrespectful. (Laughter) So, you have to feel really bad for the poor folks in these little houses who on longer have any natural light in their homes. It is a dark time for them as it is for all of us. So, basically they are fundamentally bad architecture. Now, even though I'm dressed impeccably well, I'm not the gatekeeper of what is and is not good aesthetic architecture. But, we've been talking about these things in architectural history for thousands of years starting with Vitruvius, the great-great-great -granddaddy of architecture. Sorry art history majors, this is going to be boring. So, Vitruvius said that architecture should be three things, right? It should be durable, it should be useful or functional, and it should be beautiful. And McMansions are well, you know, none of these things. So, let's start with durable. So, through most of human history houses were built to last generations, that means that you were born in the house, had kids in your house, died in your house, and then your kids had kids in your house and died in your house. AKA, they were permanent. That changed in the 1980s with access to cheaper construction methods and materials and also in deregulation economies, etc, causing a huge housing bubble, right? That we all know of. And basically these houses weren't built to last 15 years, because they were built to have the most amount of space for the lowest price, and people didn't really care about how long they'd last anyway because they were going to live there for maybe six years, maybe less because they were going to flip that house and make, like, a million dollars. A million dollars. (Laughter) And they would be on the next house before you ever knew it, so it was not their problem anymore, but we all know how that ended. So that brings me to another part of durability- they are not aesthetically durable. That means that certain house designs like you know, you have the box, and the box has a roof and the roof looks like this, and this is the house that every child draws, this is your idea of the house. These houses, of course, as you can see in this case, this is a house that is got water damage, and the balconies don't lay anywhere, you can actually go out open those doors, you will fall into your yard. (Laughter) These were just trends. People saw stuff like this on TV and said, "I want that on my house." And so they're not really aesthetically durable because they were built on these trends, and when the trends ran out, they would be onto the third house or the fourth house because they were flipping and making millions of dollars. So, according to 'Bloomberg Now,' these houses aren't selling well. And houses that are smaller, you know, like normal people houses, built for normal people not giant cars to live in, are appreciating are at a much higher and faster rate. And so we are gonna move on to useful. What does it mean for house to be useful? So there are primary uses for a house. One is to keep us, you know, out of the elements. Like you saw in the last example, it's not doing a good job of that with the water damage in the missing deck. Oh, speaking of the elements, imaging trying to heat and cool that house. So you can't even stay warm or cool without spending millions of dollars. (Laughter) But most of all, a house is suppose to be our home. It's a place for our sanctuary, community, and being one with our families. And in a space that is designed where everyone has their own room, and their own living room, and their own dining room, and their own pool table? You don't have to interact with any members of your family. So trust me I would have loved that in the seventh grade. But I think most of us are the well-adjusted people that we are, because we've had to fight with our siblings in our parents, and all these things that come from living in a smaller-knit space. And when you rob that sense of community from our homes, what real purpose do they have? But McMansions ignore both of these purposes to focus on a new purpose, and that purpose was the house is an asset, the house was now becoming through series of, you know, deregulatory economic policies, etc, a liquid asset, it was money, it was no longer a place to live, and it was seperated from the sense of place and space that we know and consider our homes, and so beautiful. McMansions don't follow the rules of traditional architecture, but really love to use the icons and the symbols, and shapes of the traditional architecture like columns in windows styles, and the box with the roof, though the roof is three times as big as the box. And in this case, you can see none of the windows actually match. Some have muntains which is the bits that separate the panes of glass, and some don't, and most of all it looks like it is a screaming animal. (Laughter) So, there's no regard for basic matching, scale, you know, the rules of architecture, because they were designed mostly from the inside out, and mommy really needed her cathedral ceilings in the bathroom. You know sometimes that meant you had a roof on that looked like this. Okay what's the point, right? Why do I even care about McMansions if they are so horrible, and why do I write about them? Well, it's about education. 60 percent of people according to the U.S. census bureau live in the suburbs, and not all of us have access to the fabric of our cities that have buildings from different eras, and all their beautiful details, all interwoven into an urban fabric. Most of us have to live with, you know, McMansions. And so it's about teaching with what you have, and also they're politically charged. They're sort of the poster child of the recession, and they are attached to concepts like urbanism and sustainability and other things that make up a better world. You might be still asking, "Okay, well, why not talk about you know good architecture?" Well why so negative? I started writing about architecture in high school to defend buildings like this. This is the Goshen Government Centre by Paul Rudolph, in Goshen, New York which is undergoing, what I like to call 'a murder.' (Laughter). I discovered, in the fight for preservation of late modernist and post-modernist architecture which is the part that I like, if you were on the side of "I don't like this," you have the advantage. People say, "Oh, I like this", and like okay, but if you say, "I don't like this," then like why? And if you don't know why you're pretty a jerk and so but that gets people talking and starts a disscusion and so in McMansion hell I saw this opportunity to explore, because a lof people hate McMansions but they have no idea why. They're like, "I hate that, it's big and it's ugly!", but they don't know what is so ugly about it or why it seems so big, and that's sort of where I come in, and it brings me to my final point. It's about the greater purpose. So my professor at Peabody where I study acoustics has this saying that says, "The first step to good design is avoiding the bad, then you can design the good, and the first step to avoiding the bad is recognizing the bad." It's about looking at the world through a critical eye, and the best part about being snarky is that you are automatically critical. And so people can say, avoiding the bad, right? You don't want a house thet looks like the ginormous thing that's on the screen here. This is literally the McMansion, it is a house that someone took to their little mouth and blew up into a balloon. It's like they took the nice house with the cable and (Puffs) Now if you know I don't like that, and here's why I don't like that then I can start thinking about encouraging other people and educating them about why I don't like that and they don't like that. And maybe through this sort of education and design, getting people who don't care about design to talk about design is another really huge step in perpetuating better design. And so through using America's ugliest and most hated houses, I mean, I'm sorry. We can... (Laughter) In talking about them in a way that introduces humor so it's not, "I'm shoving my good design down your throat, dang you!" We can encourage people through discussion, through education, through empowerment, to be a greater force for change, and a change towards a more beautiful, a more sustainable, a more inclusive, and you know, a better-looking world. (Laughter) Or at least, prevent them from building more McMansions. Thank you! (Applause)

Important Words

  1. access
  2. acoustics
  3. advantage
  4. aesthetic
  5. aesthetically
  6. aka
  7. amount
  8. animal
  9. anymore
  10. apologize
  11. applause
  12. appreciating
  13. architectural
  14. architecturally
  15. architecture
  16. art
  17. asset
  18. attached
  19. automatically
  20. average
  21. avoiding
  22. bad
  23. balconies
  24. balloon
  25. basic
  26. basically
  27. bathroom
  28. bathrooms
  29. beautiful
  30. big
  31. bits
  32. blew
  33. boring
  34. born
  35. box
  36. brings
  37. bubble
  38. building
  39. buildings
  40. built
  41. bureau
  42. cable
  43. call
  44. care
  45. cars
  46. case
  47. cathedral
  48. causing
  49. ceilings
  50. census
  51. centre
  52. chandelier
  53. change
  54. changed
  55. charged
  56. cheaper
  57. cheaply
  58. child
  59. children
  60. cities
  61. columns
  62. community
  63. concepts
  64. considers
  65. constructed
  66. construction
  67. cool
  68. couple
  69. covered
  70. critical
  71. damage
  72. dang
  73. dark
  74. deck
  75. defend
  76. deregulation
  77. deregulatory
  78. design
  79. designed
  80. designs
  81. details
  82. died
  83. dining
  84. discovered
  85. discussion
  86. disrespectful
  87. disscusion
  88. dollars
  89. door
  90. doors
  91. draws
  92. dressed
  93. durable
  94. easy
  95. economic
  96. economies
  97. educating
  98. education
  99. elements
  100. empowerment
  101. encourage
  102. encouraging
  103. ended
  104. engineering
  105. eras
  106. explore
  107. eye
  108. fabric
  109. factors
  110. fall
  111. families
  112. family
  113. faster
  114. feel
  115. feet
  116. fight
  117. final
  118. finally
  119. find
  120. flip
  121. flipping
  122. foam
  123. focus
  124. folks
  125. follow
  126. force
  127. form
  128. fourth
  129. frame
  130. front
  131. functional
  132. fundamentally
  133. garden
  134. gatekeeper
  135. generations
  136. giant
  137. ginormous
  138. glass
  139. glasses
  140. gonna
  141. good
  142. goshen
  143. government
  144. grade
  145. greater
  146. halloween
  147. hate
  148. hated
  149. heat
  150. hell
  151. high
  152. higher
  153. highest
  154. history
  155. home
  156. homes
  157. horrible
  158. house
  159. houses
  160. housing
  161. huge
  162. human
  163. humor
  164. icons
  165. idea
  166. ignore
  167. imaging
  168. impeccably
  169. inbox
  170. inclusive
  171. interact
  172. interwoven
  173. introduces
  174. issues
  175. jerk
  176. job
  177. kaleidoscope
  178. kids
  179. knew
  180. late
  181. laughter
  182. lawn
  183. lay
  184. leads
  185. life
  186. light
  187. liquid
  188. literally
  189. live
  190. living
  191. lof
  192. long
  193. longer
  194. looked
  195. love
  196. loved
  197. lovely
  198. lowest
  199. majors
  200. making
  201. marvel
  202. match
  203. matching
  204. materials
  205. mcmansion
  206. mcmansions
  207. means
  208. meant
  209. media
  210. members
  211. methods
  212. million
  213. millions
  214. missing
  215. modernist
  216. mommy
  217. money
  218. mouth
  219. move
  220. muntains
  221. murder
  222. narrowed
  223. national
  224. natural
  225. needed
  226. negative
  227. nice
  228. normal
  229. number
  230. open
  231. opportunity
  232. oversized
  233. panes
  234. parents
  235. part
  236. paul
  237. peabody
  238. people
  239. percent
  240. permanent
  241. perpetuating
  242. place
  243. point
  244. policies
  245. politically
  246. pool
  247. poor
  248. poorly
  249. porch
  250. poster
  251. preservation
  252. pretty
  253. prevent
  254. price
  255. primary
  256. problem
  257. professor
  258. puffs
  259. purpose
  260. purposes
  261. question
  262. ran
  263. rate
  264. real
  265. recession
  266. recognizing
  267. regard
  268. respect
  269. rob
  270. roof
  271. room
  272. rooms
  273. rudolph
  274. rules
  275. sanctuary
  276. scale
  277. school
  278. screaming
  279. screen
  280. selling
  281. sense
  282. sensitive
  283. separate
  284. seperated
  285. series
  286. seventh
  287. shapes
  288. shoving
  289. siblings
  290. side
  291. smaller
  292. snarky
  293. sort
  294. space
  295. speaking
  296. spending
  297. square
  298. start
  299. started
  300. starting
  301. starts
  302. stay
  303. step
  304. study
  305. stuff
  306. styles
  307. suburbs
  308. suppose
  309. sustainability
  310. sustainable
  311. symbols
  312. table
  313. talk
  314. talking
  315. teaching
  316. thet
  317. thinking
  318. thousands
  319. throat
  320. time
  321. times
  322. traditional
  323. trends
  324. trust
  325. tub
  326. tv
  327. types
  328. ugliest
  329. ugly
  330. undergoing
  331. upset
  332. urban
  333. urbanism
  334. visual
  335. vitruvius
  336. warm
  337. water
  338. wearing
  339. windows
  340. wood
  341. world
  342. worse
  343. write
  344. writing
  345. yard
  346. years
  347. york