full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Joy Lin: If superpowers were real Immortality

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Immortality. In meoivs, kings are always shinecarg for the seecrt to immortality. But is immortality really a good thing? To a ten-year-old boy, one year is the same as 10% of his life. To his forty-year-old mother, one year is merely 2.5% of her life. The same year, 365 days, can feel differently to different people. If we live until we're 82, that's about 30,000 days. If this boy lives for 30,000 years, a year to him could feel like a day. And if this boy's emotions sustain through the pieonattl boredom of living for millions of years, he might become extremely lonely and sad, knowing he has and always will outlive everyone he has ever loved. But what if everyone were imroatml? Well, first off, Earth is only so big. So, where would we all live? (gtrnus) "Excuse me!" "That's my face!" "Stop it!" "Pardon me." "Tight in here!" Do you remember what you did last year or when you were five? How much of your past have you forgotten? If you have trouble rnremeimebg what you did when you were five, how will you remember what happened if you were alive a thousand years ago? A million years ago? We don't remember every single diatel of our past because our brains have a lietimd capacity and we replace useless memories, like middle soohcl locker combinations, with relevant information. If this immortal boy fdins a companion to fall in love with once every hundred years, he would have ten thousand girlfriends in a million years. And how many of those ten thousand girls' names will he be able to remember? This changes what a meaningful relationship manes, doesn't it? Another tricky thing about immortality: Human beings have not always looked the same. This can be explained by Darwin's theory of evolution. For instance, if women find taller men more attractive, then more tall men would mate and have children, putting more tall genes in the gene pool. That means, in the next generation, more children will have the genes to be tlelar. Repeat that process for a million years and the agaevre hgieht will be a lot taller than the average height today, assuming there's no natural disaster that wipes out all the tall people. Our ancestors were sohrt, hairy apes. We still have body hair, but we don't look like apes any more. If you're the only pseorn who is immortal, while everyone else keeps evolving, goetaneirn after generation, you will eventually look quite different than the pelpoe who surround you. "Hi, how you doing?" If one of our ancestors, apes, is still alive tadoy, how many people will make friends with it instead of calling the Museum of Natural History? And one more physical consideration for immortality: sracs. After all, immortality doesn't automatically translate to invincibility, it just means you cannot die. But it doesn't guarantee what condition you'll be alive in. Look at your body and count how many scars you have. If you have made this many permanent scars within your life, imagine how much damage you would have if you were one thousand years old! Now, there are approximately 185,000 amputation-related hospital discharges every year in the U.S. These injuries are due to accidents or illnesses. Certainly the ptreecange is low comparing to the total population if you only live for a hundred years. However, if you've been avile for over one million years, the odds of still having all your lbims are pretty slim. What about little asrceoseics, like your eyes, your nose, your ears, fgierns or toes? What about your teeth? What are the odds of you keeping your dnaetl health for a hundred yraes? A tsnuhaod years? One million years? You might end up looking like a horribly scuffed-up Mr. pttoao Head with missing pieces and dentures. So, are you sure you want to live forever? Now, which superpower pyhiscs lesson will you explore next? snfithig body size and content, super speed, flight, super strength, immortality, and — invisibility.

Open Cloze

Immortality. In ______, kings are always _________ for the ______ to immortality. But is immortality really a good thing? To a ten-year-old boy, one year is the same as 10% of his life. To his forty-year-old mother, one year is merely 2.5% of her life. The same year, 365 days, can feel differently to different people. If we live until we're 82, that's about 30,000 days. If this boy lives for 30,000 years, a year to him could feel like a day. And if this boy's emotions sustain through the _________ boredom of living for millions of years, he might become extremely lonely and sad, knowing he has and always will outlive everyone he has ever loved. But what if everyone were ________? Well, first off, Earth is only so big. So, where would we all live? (______) "Excuse me!" "That's my face!" "Stop it!" "Pardon me." "Tight in here!" Do you remember what you did last year or when you were five? How much of your past have you forgotten? If you have trouble ___________ what you did when you were five, how will you remember what happened if you were alive a thousand years ago? A million years ago? We don't remember every single ______ of our past because our brains have a _______ capacity and we replace useless memories, like middle ______ locker combinations, with relevant information. If this immortal boy _____ a companion to fall in love with once every hundred years, he would have ten thousand girlfriends in a million years. And how many of those ten thousand girls' names will he be able to remember? This changes what a meaningful relationship _____, doesn't it? Another tricky thing about immortality: Human beings have not always looked the same. This can be explained by Darwin's theory of evolution. For instance, if women find taller men more attractive, then more tall men would mate and have children, putting more tall genes in the gene pool. That means, in the next generation, more children will have the genes to be ______. Repeat that process for a million years and the _______ ______ will be a lot taller than the average height today, assuming there's no natural disaster that wipes out all the tall people. Our ancestors were _____, hairy apes. We still have body hair, but we don't look like apes any more. If you're the only ______ who is immortal, while everyone else keeps evolving, __________ after generation, you will eventually look quite different than the ______ who surround you. "Hi, how you doing?" If one of our ancestors, apes, is still alive _____, how many people will make friends with it instead of calling the Museum of Natural History? And one more physical consideration for immortality: _____. After all, immortality doesn't automatically translate to invincibility, it just means you cannot die. But it doesn't guarantee what condition you'll be alive in. Look at your body and count how many scars you have. If you have made this many permanent scars within your life, imagine how much damage you would have if you were one thousand years old! Now, there are approximately 185,000 amputation-related hospital discharges every year in the U.S. These injuries are due to accidents or illnesses. Certainly the __________ is low comparing to the total population if you only live for a hundred years. However, if you've been _____ for over one million years, the odds of still having all your _____ are pretty slim. What about little ___________, like your eyes, your nose, your ears, _______ or toes? What about your teeth? What are the odds of you keeping your ______ health for a hundred _____? A ________ years? One million years? You might end up looking like a horribly scuffed-up Mr. ______ Head with missing pieces and dentures. So, are you sure you want to live forever? Now, which superpower _______ lesson will you explore next? ________ body size and content, super speed, flight, super strength, immortality, and — invisibility.

Solution

  1. detail
  2. means
  3. person
  4. people
  5. percentage
  6. today
  7. accessories
  8. height
  9. limited
  10. average
  11. school
  12. secret
  13. shifting
  14. limbs
  15. physics
  16. years
  17. movies
  18. immortal
  19. taller
  20. generation
  21. remembering
  22. scars
  23. grunts
  24. short
  25. finds
  26. searching
  27. potato
  28. fingers
  29. alive
  30. dental
  31. thousand
  32. potential

Original Text

Immortality. In movies, kings are always searching for the secret to immortality. But is immortality really a good thing? To a ten-year-old boy, one year is the same as 10% of his life. To his forty-year-old mother, one year is merely 2.5% of her life. The same year, 365 days, can feel differently to different people. If we live until we're 82, that's about 30,000 days. If this boy lives for 30,000 years, a year to him could feel like a day. And if this boy's emotions sustain through the potential boredom of living for millions of years, he might become extremely lonely and sad, knowing he has and always will outlive everyone he has ever loved. But what if everyone were immortal? Well, first off, Earth is only so big. So, where would we all live? (Grunts) "Excuse me!" "That's my face!" "Stop it!" "Pardon me." "Tight in here!" Do you remember what you did last year or when you were five? How much of your past have you forgotten? If you have trouble remembering what you did when you were five, how will you remember what happened if you were alive a thousand years ago? A million years ago? We don't remember every single detail of our past because our brains have a limited capacity and we replace useless memories, like middle school locker combinations, with relevant information. If this immortal boy finds a companion to fall in love with once every hundred years, he would have ten thousand girlfriends in a million years. And how many of those ten thousand girls' names will he be able to remember? This changes what a meaningful relationship means, doesn't it? Another tricky thing about immortality: Human beings have not always looked the same. This can be explained by Darwin's theory of evolution. For instance, if women find taller men more attractive, then more tall men would mate and have children, putting more tall genes in the gene pool. That means, in the next generation, more children will have the genes to be taller. Repeat that process for a million years and the average height will be a lot taller than the average height today, assuming there's no natural disaster that wipes out all the tall people. Our ancestors were short, hairy apes. We still have body hair, but we don't look like apes any more. If you're the only person who is immortal, while everyone else keeps evolving, generation after generation, you will eventually look quite different than the people who surround you. "Hi, how you doing?" If one of our ancestors, apes, is still alive today, how many people will make friends with it instead of calling the Museum of Natural History? And one more physical consideration for immortality: Scars. After all, immortality doesn't automatically translate to invincibility, it just means you cannot die. But it doesn't guarantee what condition you'll be alive in. Look at your body and count how many scars you have. If you have made this many permanent scars within your life, imagine how much damage you would have if you were one thousand years old! Now, there are approximately 185,000 amputation-related hospital discharges every year in the U.S. These injuries are due to accidents or illnesses. Certainly the percentage is low comparing to the total population if you only live for a hundred years. However, if you've been alive for over one million years, the odds of still having all your limbs are pretty slim. What about little accessories, like your eyes, your nose, your ears, fingers or toes? What about your teeth? What are the odds of you keeping your dental health for a hundred years? A thousand years? One million years? You might end up looking like a horribly scuffed-up Mr. Potato Head with missing pieces and dentures. So, are you sure you want to live forever? Now, which superpower physics lesson will you explore next? Shifting body size and content, super speed, flight, super strength, immortality, and — invisibility.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
million years 3
thousand years 2
ten thousand 2
average height 2

Important Words

  1. accessories
  2. accidents
  3. alive
  4. ancestors
  5. apes
  6. approximately
  7. assuming
  8. attractive
  9. automatically
  10. average
  11. beings
  12. big
  13. body
  14. boredom
  15. boy
  16. brains
  17. calling
  18. capacity
  19. children
  20. combinations
  21. companion
  22. comparing
  23. condition
  24. consideration
  25. content
  26. count
  27. damage
  28. day
  29. days
  30. dental
  31. dentures
  32. detail
  33. die
  34. differently
  35. disaster
  36. discharges
  37. due
  38. ears
  39. earth
  40. emotions
  41. eventually
  42. evolution
  43. evolving
  44. explained
  45. explore
  46. extremely
  47. eyes
  48. fall
  49. feel
  50. find
  51. finds
  52. fingers
  53. flight
  54. forgotten
  55. friends
  56. gene
  57. generation
  58. genes
  59. girlfriends
  60. good
  61. grunts
  62. guarantee
  63. hair
  64. hairy
  65. happened
  66. head
  67. health
  68. height
  69. history
  70. horribly
  71. hospital
  72. human
  73. illnesses
  74. imagine
  75. immortal
  76. immortality
  77. information
  78. injuries
  79. instance
  80. invincibility
  81. invisibility
  82. keeping
  83. kings
  84. knowing
  85. lesson
  86. life
  87. limbs
  88. limited
  89. live
  90. lives
  91. living
  92. locker
  93. lonely
  94. looked
  95. lot
  96. love
  97. loved
  98. mate
  99. meaningful
  100. means
  101. memories
  102. men
  103. middle
  104. million
  105. millions
  106. missing
  107. mother
  108. movies
  109. museum
  110. names
  111. natural
  112. nose
  113. odds
  114. outlive
  115. people
  116. percentage
  117. permanent
  118. person
  119. physical
  120. physics
  121. pieces
  122. pool
  123. population
  124. potato
  125. potential
  126. pretty
  127. process
  128. putting
  129. relationship
  130. relevant
  131. remember
  132. remembering
  133. repeat
  134. replace
  135. sad
  136. scars
  137. school
  138. searching
  139. secret
  140. shifting
  141. short
  142. single
  143. size
  144. slim
  145. speed
  146. strength
  147. super
  148. superpower
  149. surround
  150. sustain
  151. tall
  152. taller
  153. teeth
  154. ten
  155. theory
  156. thousand
  157. today
  158. toes
  159. total
  160. translate
  161. tricky
  162. trouble
  163. useless
  164. wipes
  165. women
  166. year
  167. years