full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Joy Lin: If superpowers were real Super strength

Unscramble the Blue Letters

If you wake up one mnnoirg with 1,000 times the strength you had the night before, how will you hdnale dlaceite day-to-day tasks? Everything must seem so fragile to you since the scale of your sntergth has expanded one toasuhnd times. You'd have to be very careful when you're shaking someone's hand so you don't end up breaking their bones or crushing everyone you hug. And using a fork to pick up a piece of broccoli from a Styrofoam plate without driving the fork through the ptlae is going to be as difficult as brain surgery. Say the day comes and you get the chance to save a damsel in distress fianllg from a helicopter. So, you hold out your arms, hinpog to catch her. Seconds later, you will find yourself holding her lifeless body. What hpeapned? Well, pressure is fcore divided by area. The smaller the area, the bigger the pesurrse. This is why we can lift heavy objects without breaking our skin, but a tiny ndleee can make us bleed with just a little poke. The pressure that will be exerted on her body can be calculated by force divided by the area on the top of your arms that comes in contact with her. It doesn't matter if your arms are sntorg enough to catch her body without breaking your bones. Her spine is not strong enough to be chaugt by you without being damaged. Even if you rip off the nearest door to provide a bigger area to catch her with, you still wouldn't be able to save her anyway. Remember, it's not the fall that kills her, but the sudden stop at the bottom. Let's say she's falling from a 32 story building, about 300 feet, and you are 6 feet tall, maybe 10 feet on your tippy-toes, with your arms above your head holding a door, in hopes of distributing the pressure across a legrar srucafe area, but all you're doing is essentially moving the ground up by 10 feet. So, she's now falling from 290 feet, instead of 300 feet, reaching the speed of 173 feet per second just before impact, not cnitnoug air rssnicatee. It's the equivalent of crashing at 94 miles per hour into a wall with a door in front of it. The only thing that could save her is flying. But that power comes with its own host of scientific issues. If you could fly, what you must do is fly up to her, satrt flying down at the speed she is falling, hold on to her, then gllrdaauy slow down until you come to a complete stop. This process requires a lot of cushion sacpe between the point she srtats falling and the ground. Every second you waste on changing into your sphrerueo costume and flying up to her hgheit, her head is getting that much closer to the pavement! If she's falling from a high place, and you can't get to her until she's only a few feet above the ground, there's really nothing you can do other than magically turn the pavement into marshmellow to allow her enough time to slowly come to a stop. Then, baerk out the chocolate and graham crackers and you've got s'mores. Mmmm, delicious! Now, which spoepwreur physics lesson will you explore next? Shifting body size and content, seupr seepd, flight, super strength, immortality, and invisibility.

Open Cloze

If you wake up one _______ with 1,000 times the strength you had the night before, how will you ______ ________ day-to-day tasks? Everything must seem so fragile to you since the scale of your ________ has expanded one ________ times. You'd have to be very careful when you're shaking someone's hand so you don't end up breaking their bones or crushing everyone you hug. And using a fork to pick up a piece of broccoli from a Styrofoam plate without driving the fork through the _____ is going to be as difficult as brain surgery. Say the day comes and you get the chance to save a damsel in distress _______ from a helicopter. So, you hold out your arms, ______ to catch her. Seconds later, you will find yourself holding her lifeless body. What ________? Well, pressure is _____ divided by area. The smaller the area, the bigger the ________. This is why we can lift heavy objects without breaking our skin, but a tiny ______ can make us bleed with just a little poke. The pressure that will be exerted on her body can be calculated by force divided by the area on the top of your arms that comes in contact with her. It doesn't matter if your arms are ______ enough to catch her body without breaking your bones. Her spine is not strong enough to be ______ by you without being damaged. Even if you rip off the nearest door to provide a bigger area to catch her with, you still wouldn't be able to save her anyway. Remember, it's not the fall that kills her, but the sudden stop at the bottom. Let's say she's falling from a 32 story building, about 300 feet, and you are 6 feet tall, maybe 10 feet on your tippy-toes, with your arms above your head holding a door, in hopes of distributing the pressure across a ______ _______ area, but all you're doing is essentially moving the ground up by 10 feet. So, she's now falling from 290 feet, instead of 300 feet, reaching the speed of 173 feet per second just before impact, not ________ air __________. It's the equivalent of crashing at 94 miles per hour into a wall with a door in front of it. The only thing that could save her is flying. But that power comes with its own host of scientific issues. If you could fly, what you must do is fly up to her, _____ flying down at the speed she is falling, hold on to her, then _________ slow down until you come to a complete stop. This process requires a lot of cushion _____ between the point she ______ falling and the ground. Every second you waste on changing into your _________ costume and flying up to her ______, her head is getting that much closer to the pavement! If she's falling from a high place, and you can't get to her until she's only a few feet above the ground, there's really nothing you can do other than magically turn the pavement into marshmellow to allow her enough time to slowly come to a stop. Then, _____ out the chocolate and graham crackers and you've got s'mores. Mmmm, delicious! Now, which __________ physics lesson will you explore next? Shifting body size and content, _____ _____, flight, super strength, immortality, and invisibility.

Solution

  1. hoping
  2. falling
  3. resistance
  4. caught
  5. strong
  6. thousand
  7. space
  8. handle
  9. height
  10. superpower
  11. speed
  12. plate
  13. superhero
  14. pressure
  15. start
  16. super
  17. starts
  18. morning
  19. strength
  20. surface
  21. break
  22. force
  23. larger
  24. delicate
  25. gradually
  26. needle
  27. happened
  28. counting

Original Text

If you wake up one morning with 1,000 times the strength you had the night before, how will you handle delicate day-to-day tasks? Everything must seem so fragile to you since the scale of your strength has expanded one thousand times. You'd have to be very careful when you're shaking someone's hand so you don't end up breaking their bones or crushing everyone you hug. And using a fork to pick up a piece of broccoli from a Styrofoam plate without driving the fork through the plate is going to be as difficult as brain surgery. Say the day comes and you get the chance to save a damsel in distress falling from a helicopter. So, you hold out your arms, hoping to catch her. Seconds later, you will find yourself holding her lifeless body. What happened? Well, pressure is force divided by area. The smaller the area, the bigger the pressure. This is why we can lift heavy objects without breaking our skin, but a tiny needle can make us bleed with just a little poke. The pressure that will be exerted on her body can be calculated by force divided by the area on the top of your arms that comes in contact with her. It doesn't matter if your arms are strong enough to catch her body without breaking your bones. Her spine is not strong enough to be caught by you without being damaged. Even if you rip off the nearest door to provide a bigger area to catch her with, you still wouldn't be able to save her anyway. Remember, it's not the fall that kills her, but the sudden stop at the bottom. Let's say she's falling from a 32 story building, about 300 feet, and you are 6 feet tall, maybe 10 feet on your tippy-toes, with your arms above your head holding a door, in hopes of distributing the pressure across a larger surface area, but all you're doing is essentially moving the ground up by 10 feet. So, she's now falling from 290 feet, instead of 300 feet, reaching the speed of 173 feet per second just before impact, not counting air resistance. It's the equivalent of crashing at 94 miles per hour into a wall with a door in front of it. The only thing that could save her is flying. But that power comes with its own host of scientific issues. If you could fly, what you must do is fly up to her, start flying down at the speed she is falling, hold on to her, then gradually slow down until you come to a complete stop. This process requires a lot of cushion space between the point she starts falling and the ground. Every second you waste on changing into your superhero costume and flying up to her height, her head is getting that much closer to the pavement! If she's falling from a high place, and you can't get to her until she's only a few feet above the ground, there's really nothing you can do other than magically turn the pavement into marshmellow to allow her enough time to slowly come to a stop. Then, break out the chocolate and graham crackers and you've got s'mores. Mmmm, delicious! Now, which superpower physics lesson will you explore next? Shifting body size and content, super speed, flight, super strength, immortality, and invisibility.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
force divided 2

Important Words

  1. air
  2. area
  3. arms
  4. bigger
  5. bleed
  6. body
  7. bones
  8. bottom
  9. brain
  10. break
  11. breaking
  12. broccoli
  13. building
  14. calculated
  15. careful
  16. catch
  17. caught
  18. chance
  19. changing
  20. chocolate
  21. closer
  22. complete
  23. contact
  24. content
  25. costume
  26. counting
  27. crackers
  28. crashing
  29. crushing
  30. cushion
  31. damaged
  32. damsel
  33. day
  34. delicate
  35. difficult
  36. distress
  37. distributing
  38. divided
  39. door
  40. driving
  41. equivalent
  42. essentially
  43. exerted
  44. expanded
  45. explore
  46. fall
  47. falling
  48. feet
  49. find
  50. flight
  51. fly
  52. flying
  53. force
  54. fork
  55. fragile
  56. front
  57. gradually
  58. graham
  59. ground
  60. hand
  61. handle
  62. happened
  63. head
  64. heavy
  65. height
  66. helicopter
  67. high
  68. hold
  69. holding
  70. hopes
  71. hoping
  72. host
  73. hour
  74. hug
  75. immortality
  76. impact
  77. invisibility
  78. issues
  79. kills
  80. larger
  81. lesson
  82. lifeless
  83. lift
  84. lot
  85. magically
  86. marshmellow
  87. matter
  88. miles
  89. mmmm
  90. morning
  91. moving
  92. nearest
  93. needle
  94. night
  95. objects
  96. pavement
  97. physics
  98. pick
  99. piece
  100. place
  101. plate
  102. point
  103. poke
  104. power
  105. pressure
  106. process
  107. provide
  108. reaching
  109. remember
  110. requires
  111. resistance
  112. rip
  113. save
  114. scale
  115. scientific
  116. seconds
  117. shaking
  118. shifting
  119. size
  120. skin
  121. slow
  122. slowly
  123. smaller
  124. space
  125. speed
  126. spine
  127. start
  128. starts
  129. stop
  130. story
  131. strength
  132. strong
  133. styrofoam
  134. sudden
  135. super
  136. superhero
  137. superpower
  138. surface
  139. surgery
  140. tall
  141. tasks
  142. thousand
  143. time
  144. times
  145. tiny
  146. top
  147. turn
  148. wake
  149. wall
  150. waste