full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Ron Shaneyfelt: Is space trying to kill us?

Unscramble the Blue Letters

There are still lots of things about space that we may never be able to answer, like is time taverl possible? Or are alnies living somewhere else in the mkily Way? But there is one thing I believe about space: Space is trying to kill me. Space isn't out to get me personally. It's also trying to kill you and everybody else. Think about it. Space doesn't naturally have what we need to survive when we travel there: no air, it's too hot or too cold, no ozone to protect us from those nasty UV rays, either. This all sudons bad, but what can sacpe really do to me if I stay on Earth? What we need to utsaendnrd is that objects in space can cause people to think their days are numbered, even when there are events on Earth that can hurt or kill us before something from space does. So, what are the odds that one of these objects will really affect Earth and you and me in our lifetime? Well, we can take what we know about the universe to try and fuigre that out. You might have heard sretios about asteroids hitting the etrah. That would be pretty bad. Scientists think asteroids might have klleid off most of the dinosaurs. Sounds like something we should worry about, right? Well, astronomers can now wacth asteroids in space and see them coming using complex computer meodls to pdercit the deadly rock's path. For a while, the ropteerd odds that asteroid Apophis would strike Earth in 2036 were once 1 in 625. But, after updating their data, astronomers now say the chances are extremely low. Okay, what about the sun? Hollywood movies like to pick on our sun by showing Earth destroyed by solar flares or the sun dinyg out, which would cause Earth to freeze. aromtsreons predict our sun contains enough gas to make energy for another 3 to 5 billion years. So, in 3 to 5 billion years, if people still exist on Earth, they'll have to deal with that. But today, well, we're safe. Sometimes the sun does shoot falres at Earth, but the magnetic fields surrounding our planet blocks most of that radiation. The radiation that does get through creates things like the arruoa brileaos. Gigantic solar flares can mess with our satellites and electrical equipment, but the cchnaes of it killing you are pretty slim. Okay, what about that supermassive black hole in the mlidde of our galaxy? What happens to Earth, and us, when it pulls us in? After all, it is supermassive. Nope, not going to happen. That's one big object that can't bother us. How can we be so sure? Our soalr system is on the edge of the Milky Way while the nearest supermassive black hole is about 26,000 light years from Earth. That means we aren't on that black hole's menu. So, you still think space objects are trying to kill you even after what I've told you so far? I think I've even cnenoivcd myself that odds are really good that space and the objects up there won't kill me after all. But I'll probably keep looking up just to make sure nothing is headed my way.

Open Cloze

There are still lots of things about space that we may never be able to answer, like is time ______ possible? Or are ______ living somewhere else in the _____ Way? But there is one thing I believe about space: Space is trying to kill me. Space isn't out to get me personally. It's also trying to kill you and everybody else. Think about it. Space doesn't naturally have what we need to survive when we travel there: no air, it's too hot or too cold, no ozone to protect us from those nasty UV rays, either. This all ______ bad, but what can _____ really do to me if I stay on Earth? What we need to __________ is that objects in space can cause people to think their days are numbered, even when there are events on Earth that can hurt or kill us before something from space does. So, what are the odds that one of these objects will really affect Earth and you and me in our lifetime? Well, we can take what we know about the universe to try and ______ that out. You might have heard _______ about asteroids hitting the _____. That would be pretty bad. Scientists think asteroids might have ______ off most of the dinosaurs. Sounds like something we should worry about, right? Well, astronomers can now _____ asteroids in space and see them coming using complex computer ______ to _______ the deadly rock's path. For a while, the ________ odds that asteroid Apophis would strike Earth in 2036 were once 1 in 625. But, after updating their data, astronomers now say the chances are extremely low. Okay, what about the sun? Hollywood movies like to pick on our sun by showing Earth destroyed by solar flares or the sun _____ out, which would cause Earth to freeze. ___________ predict our sun contains enough gas to make energy for another 3 to 5 billion years. So, in 3 to 5 billion years, if people still exist on Earth, they'll have to deal with that. But today, well, we're safe. Sometimes the sun does shoot ______ at Earth, but the magnetic fields surrounding our planet blocks most of that radiation. The radiation that does get through creates things like the ______ ________. Gigantic solar flares can mess with our satellites and electrical equipment, but the _______ of it killing you are pretty slim. Okay, what about that supermassive black hole in the ______ of our galaxy? What happens to Earth, and us, when it pulls us in? After all, it is supermassive. Nope, not going to happen. That's one big object that can't bother us. How can we be so sure? Our _____ system is on the edge of the Milky Way while the nearest supermassive black hole is about 26,000 light years from Earth. That means we aren't on that black hole's menu. So, you still think space objects are trying to kill you even after what I've told you so far? I think I've even _________ myself that odds are really good that space and the objects up there won't kill me after all. But I'll probably keep looking up just to make sure nothing is headed my way.

Solution

  1. milky
  2. killed
  3. solar
  4. earth
  5. sounds
  6. watch
  7. flares
  8. predict
  9. aliens
  10. borealis
  11. understand
  12. middle
  13. figure
  14. chances
  15. astronomers
  16. aurora
  17. travel
  18. dying
  19. convinced
  20. reported
  21. models
  22. space
  23. stories

Original Text

There are still lots of things about space that we may never be able to answer, like is time travel possible? Or are aliens living somewhere else in the Milky Way? But there is one thing I believe about space: Space is trying to kill me. Space isn't out to get me personally. It's also trying to kill you and everybody else. Think about it. Space doesn't naturally have what we need to survive when we travel there: no air, it's too hot or too cold, no ozone to protect us from those nasty UV rays, either. This all sounds bad, but what can space really do to me if I stay on Earth? What we need to understand is that objects in space can cause people to think their days are numbered, even when there are events on Earth that can hurt or kill us before something from space does. So, what are the odds that one of these objects will really affect Earth and you and me in our lifetime? Well, we can take what we know about the universe to try and figure that out. You might have heard stories about asteroids hitting the Earth. That would be pretty bad. Scientists think asteroids might have killed off most of the dinosaurs. Sounds like something we should worry about, right? Well, astronomers can now watch asteroids in space and see them coming using complex computer models to predict the deadly rock's path. For a while, the reported odds that asteroid Apophis would strike Earth in 2036 were once 1 in 625. But, after updating their data, astronomers now say the chances are extremely low. Okay, what about the sun? Hollywood movies like to pick on our sun by showing Earth destroyed by solar flares or the sun dying out, which would cause Earth to freeze. Astronomers predict our sun contains enough gas to make energy for another 3 to 5 billion years. So, in 3 to 5 billion years, if people still exist on Earth, they'll have to deal with that. But today, well, we're safe. Sometimes the sun does shoot flares at Earth, but the magnetic fields surrounding our planet blocks most of that radiation. The radiation that does get through creates things like the Aurora Borealis. Gigantic solar flares can mess with our satellites and electrical equipment, but the chances of it killing you are pretty slim. Okay, what about that supermassive black hole in the middle of our galaxy? What happens to Earth, and us, when it pulls us in? After all, it is supermassive. Nope, not going to happen. That's one big object that can't bother us. How can we be so sure? Our solar system is on the edge of the Milky Way while the nearest supermassive black hole is about 26,000 light years from Earth. That means we aren't on that black hole's menu. So, you still think space objects are trying to kill you even after what I've told you so far? I think I've even convinced myself that odds are really good that space and the objects up there won't kill me after all. But I'll probably keep looking up just to make sure nothing is headed my way.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
solar flares 2
supermassive black 2
black hole 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
supermassive black hole 2

Important Words

  1. affect
  2. air
  3. aliens
  4. answer
  5. apophis
  6. asteroid
  7. asteroids
  8. astronomers
  9. aurora
  10. bad
  11. big
  12. billion
  13. black
  14. blocks
  15. borealis
  16. bother
  17. chances
  18. cold
  19. coming
  20. complex
  21. computer
  22. convinced
  23. creates
  24. data
  25. days
  26. deadly
  27. deal
  28. destroyed
  29. dinosaurs
  30. dying
  31. earth
  32. edge
  33. electrical
  34. energy
  35. equipment
  36. events
  37. exist
  38. extremely
  39. fields
  40. figure
  41. flares
  42. freeze
  43. galaxy
  44. gas
  45. gigantic
  46. good
  47. happen
  48. headed
  49. heard
  50. hitting
  51. hole
  52. hollywood
  53. hot
  54. hurt
  55. kill
  56. killed
  57. killing
  58. lifetime
  59. light
  60. living
  61. lots
  62. magnetic
  63. means
  64. menu
  65. mess
  66. middle
  67. milky
  68. models
  69. movies
  70. nasty
  71. naturally
  72. nearest
  73. nope
  74. numbered
  75. object
  76. objects
  77. odds
  78. ozone
  79. path
  80. people
  81. personally
  82. pick
  83. planet
  84. predict
  85. pretty
  86. protect
  87. pulls
  88. radiation
  89. rays
  90. reported
  91. safe
  92. satellites
  93. scientists
  94. shoot
  95. showing
  96. slim
  97. solar
  98. sounds
  99. space
  100. stay
  101. stories
  102. strike
  103. sun
  104. supermassive
  105. surrounding
  106. survive
  107. system
  108. time
  109. today
  110. told
  111. travel
  112. understand
  113. universe
  114. updating
  115. uv
  116. watch
  117. worry
  118. years