full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Rufus Griscom + Alisa Volkman: Let's talk parenting taboos"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

AV: So taboo number three: you can't talk about your miscarriage — but tdaoy I'll talk about mine. So after we had daelcn, we kind of recalibrated our expectations. We thought we actually could go through this again and thought we knew what we would be up against. And we were grateful that I was able to get pregnant, and I soon learned that we were having a boy, and then when I was five months, we learned that we had lost our child. This is actually the last little image we have of him. And it was obviously a very difficult time — really pniuafl. As I was working through that mrinunog process, I was amazed that I didn't want to see anybody. I really wanted to crwal into a hole, and I didn't really know how I was going to work my way back into my surrounding community. And I realize, I think, the way I was feeling that way, is on a really deep gut level, I was finleeg a lot of shame and embarrassed, frankly, that, in some respects, I had failed at delivering what I'm genetically engineered to do. And of course, it made me question, if I wasn't able to have another child, what would that mean for my marriage, and just me as a wamon. So it was a very dfliicuft time. As I started working through it more, I started climbing out of that hole and talking with other people. I was really amazed by all the stories that started flooding in. People I interacted with daily, worked with, was friends with, family members that I had known a long time, had never shared with me their own stories. And I just rmmeeber feeling all these stories came out of the woodwork, and I felt like I happened upon this secret society of wmeon that I now was a part of, which was rnasreisug and also really concerning. And I think, miscarriage is an invisible loss. There's not really a lot of community support around it. There's really no ceremony, riutals, or rites. And I think, with a death, you have a funeral, you celebrate the life, and there's a lot of community support, and it's something women don't have with maicgrsirae.

Open Cloze

AV: So taboo number three: you can't talk about your miscarriage — but _____ I'll talk about mine. So after we had ______, we kind of recalibrated our expectations. We thought we actually could go through this again and thought we knew what we would be up against. And we were grateful that I was able to get pregnant, and I soon learned that we were having a boy, and then when I was five months, we learned that we had lost our child. This is actually the last little image we have of him. And it was obviously a very difficult time — really _______. As I was working through that ________ process, I was amazed that I didn't want to see anybody. I really wanted to _____ into a hole, and I didn't really know how I was going to work my way back into my surrounding community. And I realize, I think, the way I was feeling that way, is on a really deep gut level, I was _______ a lot of shame and embarrassed, frankly, that, in some respects, I had failed at delivering what I'm genetically engineered to do. And of course, it made me question, if I wasn't able to have another child, what would that mean for my marriage, and just me as a _____. So it was a very _________ time. As I started working through it more, I started climbing out of that hole and talking with other people. I was really amazed by all the stories that started flooding in. People I interacted with daily, worked with, was friends with, family members that I had known a long time, had never shared with me their own stories. And I just ________ feeling all these stories came out of the woodwork, and I felt like I happened upon this secret society of _____ that I now was a part of, which was __________ and also really concerning. And I think, miscarriage is an invisible loss. There's not really a lot of community support around it. There's really no ceremony, _______, or rites. And I think, with a death, you have a funeral, you celebrate the life, and there's a lot of community support, and it's something women don't have with ___________.

Solution

  1. woman
  2. remember
  3. declan
  4. difficult
  5. mourning
  6. reassuring
  7. rituals
  8. today
  9. miscarriage
  10. feeling
  11. crawl
  12. painful
  13. women

Original Text

AV: So taboo number three: you can't talk about your miscarriage — but today I'll talk about mine. So after we had Declan, we kind of recalibrated our expectations. We thought we actually could go through this again and thought we knew what we would be up against. And we were grateful that I was able to get pregnant, and I soon learned that we were having a boy, and then when I was five months, we learned that we had lost our child. This is actually the last little image we have of him. And it was obviously a very difficult time — really painful. As I was working through that mourning process, I was amazed that I didn't want to see anybody. I really wanted to crawl into a hole, and I didn't really know how I was going to work my way back into my surrounding community. And I realize, I think, the way I was feeling that way, is on a really deep gut level, I was feeling a lot of shame and embarrassed, frankly, that, in some respects, I had failed at delivering what I'm genetically engineered to do. And of course, it made me question, if I wasn't able to have another child, what would that mean for my marriage, and just me as a woman. So it was a very difficult time. As I started working through it more, I started climbing out of that hole and talking with other people. I was really amazed by all the stories that started flooding in. People I interacted with daily, worked with, was friends with, family members that I had known a long time, had never shared with me their own stories. And I just remember feeling all these stories came out of the woodwork, and I felt like I happened upon this secret society of women that I now was a part of, which was reassuring and also really concerning. And I think, miscarriage is an invisible loss. There's not really a lot of community support around it. There's really no ceremony, rituals, or rites. And I think, with a death, you have a funeral, you celebrate the life, and there's a lot of community support, and it's something women don't have with miscarriage.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
average happiness 5
taboo number 4
transcendent moments 3

Important Words

  1. amazed
  2. boy
  3. celebrate
  4. ceremony
  5. child
  6. climbing
  7. community
  8. crawl
  9. daily
  10. death
  11. declan
  12. deep
  13. delivering
  14. difficult
  15. embarrassed
  16. engineered
  17. expectations
  18. failed
  19. family
  20. feeling
  21. felt
  22. flooding
  23. frankly
  24. friends
  25. funeral
  26. genetically
  27. grateful
  28. gut
  29. happened
  30. hole
  31. image
  32. interacted
  33. invisible
  34. kind
  35. knew
  36. learned
  37. level
  38. life
  39. long
  40. loss
  41. lost
  42. lot
  43. marriage
  44. members
  45. miscarriage
  46. months
  47. mourning
  48. number
  49. painful
  50. part
  51. people
  52. pregnant
  53. process
  54. question
  55. realize
  56. reassuring
  57. recalibrated
  58. remember
  59. respects
  60. rites
  61. rituals
  62. secret
  63. shame
  64. shared
  65. society
  66. started
  67. stories
  68. support
  69. surrounding
  70. taboo
  71. talk
  72. talking
  73. thought
  74. time
  75. today
  76. wanted
  77. woman
  78. women
  79. woodwork
  80. work
  81. worked
  82. working