full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Danny Dorling: Maps that show us who we are (not just where we are)

Unscramble the Blue Letters

We've lveid in cities for a very long time, but most of us didn't live in cities. This is Çatalhöyük, one of the world's first cities. At its peak 9,000 years ago, people had to walk over the roofs of others' houses to get to their home. If you look carefully at the map of the city, you'll see it has no streets, because streets are something we invented. The world changes. It changes by trial and error. We work out slowly and gradually how to live in better ways. And the world has changed iblridncey quickly most recently. It's only within the last six, seven, or eight generations that we have actually realized that we are a secpies. It's only within the last few decades that a map like this could be dwran. Again, the underlying map is the map of world population, but over it, you're seeing aorrws shiwnog how we spread out of arfcia with dates showing you where we think we arrived at particular temis. I have to redraw this map every few months, because somebody makes a discovery that a particular date was wrong. We are lneranig about ourselves at an incredible seped. And we're changing. A lot of change is gradual. It's accretion. We don't notice the cnahge because we only have short lives, 70, 80, if you're lucky 90 years. This graph is showing you the annual rate of population growth in the wlrod. It was very low until around about 1850, and then the rate of population growth began to rise so that around the time I was born, when we first saw those images from the moon of our planet, our global population was growing at two percent a year. If it had caeirrd on gwirnog at two percent a year for just another couple of centuries, the entire planet would be covered with a shinteeg mass of human bodies all touching each other. And people were scared. They were scared of population growth and what they called "the population bomb" in 1968. But then, if you look at the end of the graph, the growth began to slow. The dcedae — the '70s, the '80s, the '90s, the noughties, and in this decade, even faster — our pploaioutn growth is slowing. Our planet is stabilizing. We are heading towards nine, 10, or 11 billion people by the end of the century. Within that change, you can see tumult. You can see the Second World War. You can see the pandemic in 1918 from influenza. You can see the great cnieshe famine. These are the events we tend to concentrate on. We tend to concentrate on the tilrrebe events in the news. We don't tend to concentrate on the gradual change and the good news serotis.

Open Cloze

We've _____ in cities for a very long time, but most of us didn't live in cities. This is Çatalhöyük, one of the world's first cities. At its peak 9,000 years ago, people had to walk over the roofs of others' houses to get to their home. If you look carefully at the map of the city, you'll see it has no streets, because streets are something we invented. The world changes. It changes by trial and error. We work out slowly and gradually how to live in better ways. And the world has changed __________ quickly most recently. It's only within the last six, seven, or eight generations that we have actually realized that we are a _______. It's only within the last few decades that a map like this could be _____. Again, the underlying map is the map of world population, but over it, you're seeing ______ _______ how we spread out of ______ with dates showing you where we think we arrived at particular _____. I have to redraw this map every few months, because somebody makes a discovery that a particular date was wrong. We are ________ about ourselves at an incredible _____. And we're changing. A lot of change is gradual. It's accretion. We don't notice the ______ because we only have short lives, 70, 80, if you're lucky 90 years. This graph is showing you the annual rate of population growth in the _____. It was very low until around about 1850, and then the rate of population growth began to rise so that around the time I was born, when we first saw those images from the moon of our planet, our global population was growing at two percent a year. If it had _______ on _______ at two percent a year for just another couple of centuries, the entire planet would be covered with a ________ mass of human bodies all touching each other. And people were scared. They were scared of population growth and what they called "the population bomb" in 1968. But then, if you look at the end of the graph, the growth began to slow. The ______ — the '70s, the '80s, the '90s, the noughties, and in this decade, even faster — our __________ growth is slowing. Our planet is stabilizing. We are heading towards nine, 10, or 11 billion people by the end of the century. Within that change, you can see tumult. You can see the Second World War. You can see the pandemic in 1918 from influenza. You can see the great _______ famine. These are the events we tend to concentrate on. We tend to concentrate on the ________ events in the news. We don't tend to concentrate on the gradual change and the good news _______.

Solution

  1. times
  2. africa
  3. population
  4. change
  5. world
  6. lived
  7. terrible
  8. decade
  9. drawn
  10. seething
  11. arrows
  12. showing
  13. species
  14. growing
  15. chinese
  16. carried
  17. incredibly
  18. stories
  19. learning
  20. speed

Original Text

We've lived in cities for a very long time, but most of us didn't live in cities. This is Çatalhöyük, one of the world's first cities. At its peak 9,000 years ago, people had to walk over the roofs of others' houses to get to their home. If you look carefully at the map of the city, you'll see it has no streets, because streets are something we invented. The world changes. It changes by trial and error. We work out slowly and gradually how to live in better ways. And the world has changed incredibly quickly most recently. It's only within the last six, seven, or eight generations that we have actually realized that we are a species. It's only within the last few decades that a map like this could be drawn. Again, the underlying map is the map of world population, but over it, you're seeing arrows showing how we spread out of Africa with dates showing you where we think we arrived at particular times. I have to redraw this map every few months, because somebody makes a discovery that a particular date was wrong. We are learning about ourselves at an incredible speed. And we're changing. A lot of change is gradual. It's accretion. We don't notice the change because we only have short lives, 70, 80, if you're lucky 90 years. This graph is showing you the annual rate of population growth in the world. It was very low until around about 1850, and then the rate of population growth began to rise so that around the time I was born, when we first saw those images from the moon of our planet, our global population was growing at two percent a year. If it had carried on growing at two percent a year for just another couple of centuries, the entire planet would be covered with a seething mass of human bodies all touching each other. And people were scared. They were scared of population growth and what they called "the population bomb" in 1968. But then, if you look at the end of the graph, the growth began to slow. The decade — the '70s, the '80s, the '90s, the noughties, and in this decade, even faster — our population growth is slowing. Our planet is stabilizing. We are heading towards nine, 10, or 11 billion people by the end of the century. Within that change, you can see tumult. You can see the Second World War. You can see the pandemic in 1918 from influenza. You can see the great Chinese famine. These are the events we tend to concentrate on. We tend to concentrate on the terrible events in the news. We don't tend to concentrate on the gradual change and the good news stories.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
population growth 4
good news 4
people live 3
incredible rate 2
growth began 2
billion people 2
news stories 2
news story 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
good news stories 2
good news story 2

Important Words

  1. accretion
  2. africa
  3. annual
  4. arrived
  5. arrows
  6. began
  7. billion
  8. bodies
  9. born
  10. called
  11. carefully
  12. carried
  13. centuries
  14. century
  15. change
  16. changed
  17. changing
  18. chinese
  19. cities
  20. city
  21. concentrate
  22. couple
  23. covered
  24. date
  25. dates
  26. decade
  27. decades
  28. discovery
  29. drawn
  30. entire
  31. error
  32. events
  33. famine
  34. faster
  35. generations
  36. global
  37. good
  38. gradual
  39. gradually
  40. graph
  41. great
  42. growing
  43. growth
  44. heading
  45. home
  46. houses
  47. human
  48. images
  49. incredible
  50. incredibly
  51. influenza
  52. invented
  53. learning
  54. live
  55. lived
  56. lives
  57. long
  58. lot
  59. lucky
  60. map
  61. mass
  62. months
  63. moon
  64. news
  65. notice
  66. noughties
  67. pandemic
  68. peak
  69. people
  70. percent
  71. planet
  72. population
  73. quickly
  74. rate
  75. realized
  76. redraw
  77. rise
  78. roofs
  79. scared
  80. seething
  81. short
  82. showing
  83. slow
  84. slowing
  85. slowly
  86. species
  87. speed
  88. spread
  89. stabilizing
  90. stories
  91. streets
  92. tend
  93. terrible
  94. time
  95. times
  96. touching
  97. trial
  98. tumult
  99. underlying
  100. walk
  101. war
  102. ways
  103. work
  104. world
  105. wrong
  106. year
  107. years