full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Paolo Bortolameolli: ¿Por qué nos emociona la música?"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

When I was seven, my father took me to a classical music concert for the first time and I went out crying. They performed Beethoven's 5th Symphony. (Music) How do you prepare a child to attend a classical music concert for the first time? A few days before, we sat down and lenitesd to a recording he had. There, he eaipelxnd a couple of simple things to me, for instance, the intscnsiee of "ta-ta-ta-tan" throughout the first movement. But that it also comes back later in the symphony. He explained that this sypomhny had four movements. Or that the end of it would be a vcoirty. A human, musical, concrete or aabtsrct kind of victory. He explained that what starts with an insistent and sententious call, becomes a triumph, full of validation and optimism. We even played a game: every time a section stteard, of which we had spoken about, I would squeeze his hand as a sign of rgotiioecnn. With this information I arrived at the thtaeer. This, and my natural curiosity filled me with expectations. I was so focused enjoying the music, but also the experience of being there: the public paying attention, the orchestra, the passionate sound. Everything was like what I anticipated, until something incredible happened. Something that to this day I consider one of the most perceft misacul moments ever wirtten. A miracle. The music had been repeating a gesture for quite a while, (Plays the piano) Do you recognize it? But also, a progression of cohdrs that made me think that after this, surely, this would come. A kind of "musical common sense." But there is no miracle on that. Humbly, I could have written that resolution myself, so we would've finished the movement, and let ppolee cough happily and compulsively, or check their pnhoes. But I didn't write this piece of music. And Beethoven is Beethoven for a reason. Let's go back a few seconds: (Music) All this follows a pattern and we already know how it should end. And this? This is not what I expected. A child would say: it's like cheating you. That note coming from another musical usenivre surprises us. The music, the rhythm, barely beats on the edge of its extinction. Little by little it szibealtis, showing vital signs. From that pulse, the violins sprout and an erratic inntirmteett melodic line, until both find cntsecnisoy, too. In that way the music captures our attention. A mmoent charged with the promise of an imienmnt outcome. That something that we know will happen; that without realizing it, we already eeetcpxd it. (muisc) After that my father looked at me and hggued me, deeply moved. I was crying. I looked at him and said: "I don't know why I'm crying, for it is not sadness what I feel." That moment marked my life. At that moment, being seven years old, I decided to dedicate my life to music. Because I wanted to recreate that moment, uaensntdrd it and then share and spread it. Let's see if we can do it here now, I think it's contagious. When I talked about this unexpected note, that key to new options that finally become the door to this great musical tmuiprh, I was pnntioig to a very simple and common phenomenon of life itself: expectations. Had the third movement efvifceetly finished like this, (Plays the pinao) our perception of what happened would've stayed within certain range of expectations. We basically rviecee what we expect. The music ends, the audience coughs and accommodates their seats. (Laughter) The musicians relax for a second until the director raises his hands again in a sign of onslaught to cunosqet the last movement. It works. The music ipatmcs anyway. But it's not the same. This transition Beethoven wrote not only succeeds in cinnctenog one music with another, but it caeters another kind of expectations. From that unexpected note, until the sraceh for new stability in the rhythm, the melody, the harmony and the texture that gorws to end up in something even gtearer. But in the meantime, our mind reacts. It sratts looking for alternatives, possible siaceorns. And Beethoven knows it. That's why that dissolution and rambling of the music confuses us. And that confusion brings on eepixntotcas which are a mix of poirtdecin and willingness to keep on being surprised, since the same music soewhd us that everything is possible. On another extra musical level it looks like my own attitude before and during the concert. The information from my father was an incentive to get to the theater full of expectations. To recognize what I already knew, to verify it. But once I was surprised, everything was possible. The evocative power of music comes to an extent from its ability to create, prolong, suspend, or even betray expectations. But what do we expect from it, from music itself? A melody and an annmccameoipt. An idea that presents itself, talks and finds a closure. A new, more happy idea. Everything peaceful and expected. Expectations fulfilled. Aha! An unexpected turn ... Drama! Opera! You didn't see that coming. Because it is esaeir to predict from consistency. Like in this prelude from Bach. We are designed to look for stability and reaffirm a prediction. Associations are triggered and our memory draws conclusions. Consistency allows us anticipate and guess rightly. And one of the sources of pleasure when listening to music is when our expectations are met. But, what happens when we lose control on the predictions? When they are not met? A great tool of Romanticism. fanrz Liszt pyals with surprises. A passionate, raptured melody, that begins a journey. But comes back. And then, when everything seems to go on the same, safe and prtelbidcae path, this! A door opens, another alternative. Which destabilizes, but fascinates. One more! It was like finding options that were not possible. And that chlgleane to our expectations seduces us. Or a cstoarnt. Mahler declares: "Dark is life. Dark is death." Serious and hopeless, the music takes a new turn. But also, this music has a hint of mvomeent, of a dcane, of a waltz. Of course! The style, toidraitn and heritage also generate expectations. Because Mahler is an heir of a whole Viennese tradition where this music is part of its DNA. And of ours? Didn't some of you smile when recognizing this waltz from Strauss? Which is also full of small games of expectations. Like these subtle changes in tempo. That cmiong and going, that brings about so much grace. Or more radical surprises. A new waltz! Like I told you, tradition lies in the collective uonucnociss and through gestures like this: one two three, one two three ... we can even recognize a distorted and decadent waltz written before the First World War. Isn't it like a spkooy echo of that vneeinse waltz? Those notes, apparently unconnected, are the product of years of transformation of musical rules. Wagner was one who cbrtoiunetd, in his case, by being a graet manipulator of expectations. Suggestive music, full of eroticism where each note, each sound clings to the next one, crawling and sticking to it. But, permanently changing direction. Not everything that sounds can be unexpected. A silence can also be provocative and lvaee open questions. The deafening silence ... Debussy and his susanel "Prelude to the afternoon of a faun" and that suggestive silence at the beginning. Silence, that essential eeenmlt of music. More than an absence of sound, it is a fundamental expressive resource. And one of my favorite silences is that complicit silence. Loaded with expectations. The one that happens before music is. (Music) But also every new silence. Giving moments of lucubration. Being part of the sepech and connecting ideas that can continue to grow. Contrasts, stability and instability. By the way, the stability of the pulse, and how we group it is an instinctive reaction we have as soon as we ifdetniy regularity. One, two, one, two ... But, what happens when we can't even anticipate this gropinug? And we are just left at the mercy of the utnsable? lenntisig to music can be like renidag a good detective story. Like those in which you even doubt the dead. (Laughter) Where the plot and the impending outcome will make you more sensitive to how the tnicekshs of the pages decreases. Expectations on the weight over the tip of your fingers. The state of attention changes, it's active and increasingly sateuviclpe. It is no longer, "if this, then that." But, "and if this, then that? This other or that one?" Like everything in life, in the nature of art it is also present this idea that you have to eepcxt the unexpected. But notice that the unexpected doesn't just taste like first time. That's why we read a book or wtach a movie many times, or we lstein to that music we like so much on repeat. Partly, this is because we like to experiment from security. Like a child who reads the same story tale every night, with the relief of knowing how it ends. But also rereading through memory gives us other details. It makes us pay attention to other places. We listen now not to the melody, but the accompaniment for example, to discover that bfauuteil music that had gone uniencotd, even when it was always there. To recognize, but also to rveoedsicr. An infinite game of expectations. Or the rohlesnitaip between the performer and the listener, "How will he do it? Surely different from the rnrodgices that I know!" But that's the idea! Because music is an organism, that breathes and it's alive at the very moment it sounds. Only there music is. And listening to it live allows us to live that moment full of expectations. When the concert ended, my dad took me to meet the director. I saw him and I started crying again. (lteughar) Without saying anything, I thought: you are responsible for these tears! He gave me a puzzled look. He asked if anything had happened, for many reasons can make a seven-year-old boy cry. My father, still moevd, summed it up and understanding now the iacpmt that music had had me, the dirtecor hugged me and said: "Well, that's why we do what we do." That day changed my life. Ever since, my expectations are to change yours. Thank you. (Applause)

Open Cloze

When I was seven, my father took me to a classical music concert for the first time and I went out crying. They performed Beethoven's 5th Symphony. (Music) How do you prepare a child to attend a classical music concert for the first time? A few days before, we sat down and ________ to a recording he had. There, he _________ a couple of simple things to me, for instance, the __________ of "ta-ta-ta-tan" throughout the first movement. But that it also comes back later in the symphony. He explained that this ________ had four movements. Or that the end of it would be a _______. A human, musical, concrete or ________ kind of victory. He explained that what starts with an insistent and sententious call, becomes a triumph, full of validation and optimism. We even played a game: every time a section _______, of which we had spoken about, I would squeeze his hand as a sign of ___________. With this information I arrived at the _______. This, and my natural curiosity filled me with expectations. I was so focused enjoying the music, but also the experience of being there: the public paying attention, the orchestra, the passionate sound. Everything was like what I anticipated, until something incredible happened. Something that to this day I consider one of the most _______ _______ moments ever _______. A miracle. The music had been repeating a gesture for quite a while, (Plays the piano) Do you recognize it? But also, a progression of ______ that made me think that after this, surely, this would come. A kind of "musical common sense." But there is no miracle on that. Humbly, I could have written that resolution myself, so we would've finished the movement, and let ______ cough happily and compulsively, or check their ______. But I didn't write this piece of music. And Beethoven is Beethoven for a reason. Let's go back a few seconds: (Music) All this follows a pattern and we already know how it should end. And this? This is not what I expected. A child would say: it's like cheating you. That note coming from another musical ________ surprises us. The music, the rhythm, barely beats on the edge of its extinction. Little by little it __________, showing vital signs. From that pulse, the violins sprout and an erratic ____________ melodic line, until both find ___________, too. In that way the music captures our attention. A ______ charged with the promise of an ________ outcome. That something that we know will happen; that without realizing it, we already ________ it. (_____) After that my father looked at me and ______ me, deeply moved. I was crying. I looked at him and said: "I don't know why I'm crying, for it is not sadness what I feel." That moment marked my life. At that moment, being seven years old, I decided to dedicate my life to music. Because I wanted to recreate that moment, __________ it and then share and spread it. Let's see if we can do it here now, I think it's contagious. When I talked about this unexpected note, that key to new options that finally become the door to this great musical _______, I was ________ to a very simple and common phenomenon of life itself: expectations. Had the third movement ___________ finished like this, (Plays the _____) our perception of what happened would've stayed within certain range of expectations. We basically _______ what we expect. The music ends, the audience coughs and accommodates their seats. (Laughter) The musicians relax for a second until the director raises his hands again in a sign of onslaught to ________ the last movement. It works. The music _______ anyway. But it's not the same. This transition Beethoven wrote not only succeeds in __________ one music with another, but it _______ another kind of expectations. From that unexpected note, until the ______ for new stability in the rhythm, the melody, the harmony and the texture that _____ to end up in something even _______. But in the meantime, our mind reacts. It ______ looking for alternatives, possible _________. And Beethoven knows it. That's why that dissolution and rambling of the music confuses us. And that confusion brings on ____________ which are a mix of __________ and willingness to keep on being surprised, since the same music ______ us that everything is possible. On another extra musical level it looks like my own attitude before and during the concert. The information from my father was an incentive to get to the theater full of expectations. To recognize what I already knew, to verify it. But once I was surprised, everything was possible. The evocative power of music comes to an extent from its ability to create, prolong, suspend, or even betray expectations. But what do we expect from it, from music itself? A melody and an _____________. An idea that presents itself, talks and finds a closure. A new, more happy idea. Everything peaceful and expected. Expectations fulfilled. Aha! An unexpected turn ... Drama! Opera! You didn't see that coming. Because it is ______ to predict from consistency. Like in this prelude from Bach. We are designed to look for stability and reaffirm a prediction. Associations are triggered and our memory draws conclusions. Consistency allows us anticipate and guess rightly. And one of the sources of pleasure when listening to music is when our expectations are met. But, what happens when we lose control on the predictions? When they are not met? A great tool of Romanticism. _____ Liszt _____ with surprises. A passionate, raptured melody, that begins a journey. But comes back. And then, when everything seems to go on the same, safe and ___________ path, this! A door opens, another alternative. Which destabilizes, but fascinates. One more! It was like finding options that were not possible. And that _________ to our expectations seduces us. Or a ________. Mahler declares: "Dark is life. Dark is death." Serious and hopeless, the music takes a new turn. But also, this music has a hint of ________, of a _____, of a waltz. Of course! The style, _________ and heritage also generate expectations. Because Mahler is an heir of a whole Viennese tradition where this music is part of its DNA. And of ours? Didn't some of you smile when recognizing this waltz from Strauss? Which is also full of small games of expectations. Like these subtle changes in tempo. That ______ and going, that brings about so much grace. Or more radical surprises. A new waltz! Like I told you, tradition lies in the collective ___________ and through gestures like this: one two three, one two three ... we can even recognize a distorted and decadent waltz written before the First World War. Isn't it like a ______ echo of that ________ waltz? Those notes, apparently unconnected, are the product of years of transformation of musical rules. Wagner was one who ___________, in his case, by being a _____ manipulator of expectations. Suggestive music, full of eroticism where each note, each sound clings to the next one, crawling and sticking to it. But, permanently changing direction. Not everything that sounds can be unexpected. A silence can also be provocative and _____ open questions. The deafening silence ... Debussy and his _______ "Prelude to the afternoon of a faun" and that suggestive silence at the beginning. Silence, that essential _______ of music. More than an absence of sound, it is a fundamental expressive resource. And one of my favorite silences is that complicit silence. Loaded with expectations. The one that happens before music is. (Music) But also every new silence. Giving moments of lucubration. Being part of the ______ and connecting ideas that can continue to grow. Contrasts, stability and instability. By the way, the stability of the pulse, and how we group it is an instinctive reaction we have as soon as we ________ regularity. One, two, one, two ... But, what happens when we can't even anticipate this ________? And we are just left at the mercy of the ________? _________ to music can be like _______ a good detective story. Like those in which you even doubt the dead. (Laughter) Where the plot and the impending outcome will make you more sensitive to how the _________ of the pages decreases. Expectations on the weight over the tip of your fingers. The state of attention changes, it's active and increasingly ___________. It is no longer, "if this, then that." But, "and if this, then that? This other or that one?" Like everything in life, in the nature of art it is also present this idea that you have to ______ the unexpected. But notice that the unexpected doesn't just taste like first time. That's why we read a book or _____ a movie many times, or we ______ to that music we like so much on repeat. Partly, this is because we like to experiment from security. Like a child who reads the same story tale every night, with the relief of knowing how it ends. But also rereading through memory gives us other details. It makes us pay attention to other places. We listen now not to the melody, but the accompaniment for example, to discover that _________ music that had gone _________, even when it was always there. To recognize, but also to __________. An infinite game of expectations. Or the ____________ between the performer and the listener, "How will he do it? Surely different from the __________ that I know!" But that's the idea! Because music is an organism, that breathes and it's alive at the very moment it sounds. Only there music is. And listening to it live allows us to live that moment full of expectations. When the concert ended, my dad took me to meet the director. I saw him and I started crying again. (________) Without saying anything, I thought: you are responsible for these tears! He gave me a puzzled look. He asked if anything had happened, for many reasons can make a seven-year-old boy cry. My father, still _____, summed it up and understanding now the ______ that music had had me, the ________ hugged me and said: "Well, that's why we do what we do." That day changed my life. Ever since, my expectations are to change yours. Thank you. (Applause)

Solution

  1. listen
  2. moved
  3. challenge
  4. contributed
  5. laughter
  6. conquest
  7. listened
  8. relationship
  9. speech
  10. thickness
  11. musical
  12. contrast
  13. piano
  14. leave
  15. effectively
  16. connecting
  17. creates
  18. started
  19. triumph
  20. receive
  21. spooky
  22. recordings
  23. unnoticed
  24. speculative
  25. identify
  26. dance
  27. great
  28. movement
  29. expectations
  30. moment
  31. sensual
  32. perfect
  33. symphony
  34. grouping
  35. watch
  36. impact
  37. accompaniment
  38. expected
  39. understand
  40. insistence
  41. intermittent
  42. impacts
  43. scenarios
  44. written
  45. universe
  46. chords
  47. pointing
  48. plays
  49. grows
  50. phones
  51. explained
  52. starts
  53. people
  54. hugged
  55. reading
  56. unstable
  57. imminent
  58. franz
  59. theater
  60. unconscious
  61. recognition
  62. tradition
  63. listening
  64. coming
  65. greater
  66. beautiful
  67. abstract
  68. music
  69. expect
  70. search
  71. showed
  72. consistency
  73. predictable
  74. director
  75. rediscover
  76. element
  77. easier
  78. prediction
  79. victory
  80. viennese
  81. stabilizes

Original Text

When I was seven, my father took me to a classical music concert for the first time and I went out crying. They performed Beethoven's 5th Symphony. (Music) How do you prepare a child to attend a classical music concert for the first time? A few days before, we sat down and listened to a recording he had. There, he explained a couple of simple things to me, for instance, the insistence of "ta-ta-ta-tan" throughout the first movement. But that it also comes back later in the symphony. He explained that this symphony had four movements. Or that the end of it would be a victory. A human, musical, concrete or abstract kind of victory. He explained that what starts with an insistent and sententious call, becomes a triumph, full of validation and optimism. We even played a game: every time a section started, of which we had spoken about, I would squeeze his hand as a sign of recognition. With this information I arrived at the theater. This, and my natural curiosity filled me with expectations. I was so focused enjoying the music, but also the experience of being there: the public paying attention, the orchestra, the passionate sound. Everything was like what I anticipated, until something incredible happened. Something that to this day I consider one of the most perfect musical moments ever written. A miracle. The music had been repeating a gesture for quite a while, (Plays the piano) Do you recognize it? But also, a progression of chords that made me think that after this, surely, this would come. A kind of "musical common sense." But there is no miracle on that. Humbly, I could have written that resolution myself, so we would've finished the movement, and let people cough happily and compulsively, or check their phones. But I didn't write this piece of music. And Beethoven is Beethoven for a reason. Let's go back a few seconds: (Music) All this follows a pattern and we already know how it should end. And this? This is not what I expected. A child would say: it's like cheating you. That note coming from another musical universe surprises us. The music, the rhythm, barely beats on the edge of its extinction. Little by little it stabilizes, showing vital signs. From that pulse, the violins sprout and an erratic intermittent melodic line, until both find consistency, too. In that way the music captures our attention. A moment charged with the promise of an imminent outcome. That something that we know will happen; that without realizing it, we already expected it. (Music) After that my father looked at me and hugged me, deeply moved. I was crying. I looked at him and said: "I don't know why I'm crying, for it is not sadness what I feel." That moment marked my life. At that moment, being seven years old, I decided to dedicate my life to music. Because I wanted to recreate that moment, understand it and then share and spread it. Let's see if we can do it here now, I think it's contagious. When I talked about this unexpected note, that key to new options that finally become the door to this great musical triumph, I was pointing to a very simple and common phenomenon of life itself: expectations. Had the third movement effectively finished like this, (Plays the piano) our perception of what happened would've stayed within certain range of expectations. We basically receive what we expect. The music ends, the audience coughs and accommodates their seats. (Laughter) The musicians relax for a second until the director raises his hands again in a sign of onslaught to conquest the last movement. It works. The music impacts anyway. But it's not the same. This transition Beethoven wrote not only succeeds in connecting one music with another, but it creates another kind of expectations. From that unexpected note, until the search for new stability in the rhythm, the melody, the harmony and the texture that grows to end up in something even greater. But in the meantime, our mind reacts. It starts looking for alternatives, possible scenarios. And Beethoven knows it. That's why that dissolution and rambling of the music confuses us. And that confusion brings on expectations which are a mix of prediction and willingness to keep on being surprised, since the same music showed us that everything is possible. On another extra musical level it looks like my own attitude before and during the concert. The information from my father was an incentive to get to the theater full of expectations. To recognize what I already knew, to verify it. But once I was surprised, everything was possible. The evocative power of music comes to an extent from its ability to create, prolong, suspend, or even betray expectations. But what do we expect from it, from music itself? A melody and an accompaniment. An idea that presents itself, talks and finds a closure. A new, more happy idea. Everything peaceful and expected. Expectations fulfilled. Aha! An unexpected turn ... Drama! Opera! You didn't see that coming. Because it is easier to predict from consistency. Like in this prelude from Bach. We are designed to look for stability and reaffirm a prediction. Associations are triggered and our memory draws conclusions. Consistency allows us anticipate and guess rightly. And one of the sources of pleasure when listening to music is when our expectations are met. But, what happens when we lose control on the predictions? When they are not met? A great tool of Romanticism. Franz Liszt plays with surprises. A passionate, raptured melody, that begins a journey. But comes back. And then, when everything seems to go on the same, safe and predictable path, this! A door opens, another alternative. Which destabilizes, but fascinates. One more! It was like finding options that were not possible. And that challenge to our expectations seduces us. Or a contrast. Mahler declares: "Dark is life. Dark is death." Serious and hopeless, the music takes a new turn. But also, this music has a hint of movement, of a dance, of a waltz. Of course! The style, tradition and heritage also generate expectations. Because Mahler is an heir of a whole Viennese tradition where this music is part of its DNA. And of ours? Didn't some of you smile when recognizing this waltz from Strauss? Which is also full of small games of expectations. Like these subtle changes in tempo. That coming and going, that brings about so much grace. Or more radical surprises. A new waltz! Like I told you, tradition lies in the collective unconscious and through gestures like this: one two three, one two three ... we can even recognize a distorted and decadent waltz written before the First World War. Isn't it like a spooky echo of that Viennese waltz? Those notes, apparently unconnected, are the product of years of transformation of musical rules. Wagner was one who contributed, in his case, by being a great manipulator of expectations. Suggestive music, full of eroticism where each note, each sound clings to the next one, crawling and sticking to it. But, permanently changing direction. Not everything that sounds can be unexpected. A silence can also be provocative and leave open questions. The deafening silence ... Debussy and his sensual "Prelude to the afternoon of a faun" and that suggestive silence at the beginning. Silence, that essential element of music. More than an absence of sound, it is a fundamental expressive resource. And one of my favorite silences is that complicit silence. Loaded with expectations. The one that happens before music is. (Music) But also every new silence. Giving moments of lucubration. Being part of the speech and connecting ideas that can continue to grow. Contrasts, stability and instability. By the way, the stability of the pulse, and how we group it is an instinctive reaction we have as soon as we identify regularity. One, two, one, two ... But, what happens when we can't even anticipate this grouping? And we are just left at the mercy of the unstable? Listening to music can be like reading a good detective story. Like those in which you even doubt the dead. (Laughter) Where the plot and the impending outcome will make you more sensitive to how the thickness of the pages decreases. Expectations on the weight over the tip of your fingers. The state of attention changes, it's active and increasingly speculative. It is no longer, "if this, then that." But, "and if this, then that? This other or that one?" Like everything in life, in the nature of art it is also present this idea that you have to expect the unexpected. But notice that the unexpected doesn't just taste like first time. That's why we read a book or watch a movie many times, or we listen to that music we like so much on repeat. Partly, this is because we like to experiment from security. Like a child who reads the same story tale every night, with the relief of knowing how it ends. But also rereading through memory gives us other details. It makes us pay attention to other places. We listen now not to the melody, but the accompaniment for example, to discover that beautiful music that had gone unnoticed, even when it was always there. To recognize, but also to rediscover. An infinite game of expectations. Or the relationship between the performer and the listener, "How will he do it? Surely different from the recordings that I know!" But that's the idea! Because music is an organism, that breathes and it's alive at the very moment it sounds. Only there music is. And listening to it live allows us to live that moment full of expectations. When the concert ended, my dad took me to meet the director. I saw him and I started crying again. (Laughter) Without saying anything, I thought: you are responsible for these tears! He gave me a puzzled look. He asked if anything had happened, for many reasons can make a seven-year-old boy cry. My father, still moved, summed it up and understanding now the impact that music had had me, the director hugged me and said: "Well, that's why we do what we do." That day changed my life. Ever since, my expectations are to change yours. Thank you. (Applause)

Important Words

  1. ability
  2. absence
  3. abstract
  4. accommodates
  5. accompaniment
  6. active
  7. afternoon
  8. alive
  9. alternative
  10. alternatives
  11. anticipate
  12. anticipated
  13. apparently
  14. applause
  15. arrived
  16. art
  17. asked
  18. associations
  19. attend
  20. attention
  21. attitude
  22. audience
  23. bach
  24. barely
  25. basically
  26. beats
  27. beautiful
  28. beethoven
  29. beginning
  30. begins
  31. betray
  32. book
  33. boy
  34. breathes
  35. brings
  36. call
  37. captures
  38. case
  39. challenge
  40. change
  41. changed
  42. changing
  43. charged
  44. cheating
  45. check
  46. child
  47. chords
  48. classical
  49. clings
  50. closure
  51. collective
  52. coming
  53. common
  54. complicit
  55. compulsively
  56. concert
  57. conclusions
  58. concrete
  59. confuses
  60. confusion
  61. connecting
  62. conquest
  63. consistency
  64. contagious
  65. continue
  66. contrast
  67. contrasts
  68. contributed
  69. control
  70. cough
  71. coughs
  72. couple
  73. crawling
  74. create
  75. creates
  76. cry
  77. crying
  78. curiosity
  79. dad
  80. dance
  81. dark
  82. day
  83. days
  84. dead
  85. deafening
  86. death
  87. debussy
  88. decadent
  89. decided
  90. decreases
  91. dedicate
  92. deeply
  93. designed
  94. destabilizes
  95. details
  96. detective
  97. direction
  98. director
  99. discover
  100. dissolution
  101. distorted
  102. dna
  103. door
  104. doubt
  105. draws
  106. easier
  107. echo
  108. edge
  109. effectively
  110. element
  111. ended
  112. ends
  113. enjoying
  114. eroticism
  115. erratic
  116. essential
  117. evocative
  118. expect
  119. expectations
  120. expected
  121. experience
  122. experiment
  123. explained
  124. expressive
  125. extent
  126. extinction
  127. extra
  128. fascinates
  129. father
  130. favorite
  131. feel
  132. filled
  133. finally
  134. find
  135. finding
  136. finds
  137. fingers
  138. finished
  139. focused
  140. franz
  141. fulfilled
  142. full
  143. fundamental
  144. game
  145. games
  146. gave
  147. generate
  148. gesture
  149. gestures
  150. giving
  151. good
  152. grace
  153. great
  154. greater
  155. group
  156. grouping
  157. grow
  158. grows
  159. guess
  160. hand
  161. hands
  162. happened
  163. happily
  164. happy
  165. harmony
  166. heir
  167. heritage
  168. hint
  169. hopeless
  170. hugged
  171. human
  172. humbly
  173. idea
  174. ideas
  175. identify
  176. imminent
  177. impact
  178. impacts
  179. impending
  180. incentive
  181. increasingly
  182. incredible
  183. infinite
  184. information
  185. insistence
  186. insistent
  187. instability
  188. instance
  189. instinctive
  190. intermittent
  191. journey
  192. key
  193. kind
  194. knew
  195. knowing
  196. laughter
  197. leave
  198. left
  199. level
  200. lies
  201. life
  202. line
  203. listen
  204. listened
  205. listener
  206. listening
  207. liszt
  208. live
  209. loaded
  210. longer
  211. looked
  212. lose
  213. lucubration
  214. mahler
  215. manipulator
  216. marked
  217. meet
  218. melodic
  219. melody
  220. memory
  221. mercy
  222. met
  223. mind
  224. miracle
  225. mix
  226. moment
  227. moments
  228. moved
  229. movement
  230. movements
  231. movie
  232. music
  233. musical
  234. musicians
  235. natural
  236. nature
  237. night
  238. note
  239. notes
  240. notice
  241. onslaught
  242. open
  243. opens
  244. optimism
  245. options
  246. orchestra
  247. organism
  248. outcome
  249. pages
  250. part
  251. partly
  252. passionate
  253. path
  254. pattern
  255. pay
  256. paying
  257. peaceful
  258. people
  259. perception
  260. perfect
  261. performed
  262. performer
  263. permanently
  264. phenomenon
  265. phones
  266. piano
  267. piece
  268. places
  269. played
  270. plays
  271. pleasure
  272. plot
  273. pointing
  274. power
  275. predict
  276. predictable
  277. prediction
  278. predictions
  279. prelude
  280. prepare
  281. present
  282. presents
  283. product
  284. progression
  285. prolong
  286. promise
  287. provocative
  288. public
  289. pulse
  290. puzzled
  291. questions
  292. radical
  293. raises
  294. rambling
  295. range
  296. raptured
  297. reaction
  298. reacts
  299. read
  300. reading
  301. reads
  302. reaffirm
  303. realizing
  304. reason
  305. reasons
  306. receive
  307. recognition
  308. recognize
  309. recognizing
  310. recording
  311. recordings
  312. recreate
  313. rediscover
  314. regularity
  315. relationship
  316. relax
  317. relief
  318. repeat
  319. repeating
  320. rereading
  321. resolution
  322. resource
  323. responsible
  324. rhythm
  325. rightly
  326. romanticism
  327. rules
  328. sadness
  329. safe
  330. sat
  331. scenarios
  332. search
  333. seats
  334. section
  335. security
  336. seduces
  337. sense
  338. sensitive
  339. sensual
  340. sententious
  341. share
  342. showed
  343. showing
  344. sign
  345. signs
  346. silence
  347. silences
  348. simple
  349. small
  350. smile
  351. sound
  352. sounds
  353. sources
  354. speculative
  355. speech
  356. spoken
  357. spooky
  358. spread
  359. sprout
  360. squeeze
  361. stability
  362. stabilizes
  363. started
  364. starts
  365. state
  366. stayed
  367. sticking
  368. story
  369. strauss
  370. style
  371. subtle
  372. succeeds
  373. suggestive
  374. summed
  375. surely
  376. surprised
  377. surprises
  378. suspend
  379. symphony
  380. takes
  381. tale
  382. talked
  383. talks
  384. taste
  385. tempo
  386. texture
  387. theater
  388. thickness
  389. time
  390. times
  391. tip
  392. told
  393. tool
  394. tradition
  395. transformation
  396. transition
  397. triggered
  398. triumph
  399. turn
  400. unconnected
  401. unconscious
  402. understand
  403. understanding
  404. unexpected
  405. universe
  406. unnoticed
  407. unstable
  408. validation
  409. verify
  410. victory
  411. viennese
  412. violins
  413. vital
  414. wagner
  415. waltz
  416. wanted
  417. war
  418. watch
  419. weight
  420. willingness
  421. works
  422. world
  423. write
  424. written
  425. wrote
  426. years