full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Alexis Jones: Redefining manhood—one locker room talk at a time"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

"Here we go, we're going to have this conversation." Then I click the next slide, and I said, "But it's different when it's her." And I memorized ten to fifteen names, I said, "It's different when it's saarh, and when it's lreaun, and when it's Jenny." And now these guys are looking at their 16-year-old sister. Half the guys in the room saetrtd crying. We have to reframe this issue to make this eetxrmley personal to them. Number three, we have to have a conversation about respect. You can't give something that you don't have. We have to imbue these young men with more self-respect, so that they're able to taret others with more dignity. What dawned on me was that we are not tihnecag enough emotional education in school right now, we are certainly not teaching these young men how to caerte an auniehttc confidence, so they are snroiucg it from exactly where they know how. Through performance, through popularity, and through possessions. We have to broaden a definition of cndnoifcee that is not contingent on social media highlight reels and external vdalaitoin. Number four: We have to have real talk with these guys. I have yet to come into a locker room where they use wrdos like "consent" and "bystander." Those are words that we use, in our shiny star studded PSAs. I have yet to hear of a guy come in, and raise his hand, and be like, "There's this really great opportunity for us, bystanders, to intervene." (Laughter) I have never heard of a guy be like, "We were in the middle of hooking up, I'm not gnnoa lie, I pusaed, I was like, 'I just wanna make sure that I officially have your consent moving forward.'" (Laughter) That's not me poking fun at the intention behind these words. That's just we have to give them real language and real tools for the metnoms that we are asking them to be brave. We have to work with them, and be in conversation with them, to offer them language when they see something sketchy, being able to say, "Yo, we don't do that." That in the mlidde of hooking up, to give them lanuagge like, "Yo, I just wanna make sure that you're cool with us having sex." Because as long as we're talking to them like academic robots, I think we're setting them up to fail. And as far as a few calls to action, anyone in media, please stop crucifying coaches and universities when this stuff happens in their locker room; we're at pandemic levels, this is happening everywhere. Instead, just celebrate the universities who are doing it right, so that we can inspire others to follow suit. For chcaoes and educators, please invest in programs like these, that are preventative medicine, we cannot continue to triage these symptoms, putting band-aids on bullet wounds. For panerts out there, you hold all the pewor in your wleatls. Demand that, in order for you to pay ttuioin, these schools have to invest in the safety of both your daughters and your sons. For settudns out there, ask your administration to invest in these kinds of pgarmors. And for sdetnut athletes out there, say that you are not going to sign with any urietisvny that isn't making prevention a prtirioy. For policy makers out there, if you have to have a driver's license to drive a car, why would you not have to take a mtadranoy sexual assault pverinoetn program, in order to attend a college or play sports? For the National League team owners, would you be so audacious as to sign a ProtectHer pledge that says that you won't draft any students who have sxaeul aluasst ccivnoiotns. To be a professional athlete is a privilege, it's a real-life superhero in this country, and you literally have the atiibly to change the etnire game with those kinds of standards. ltalsy, phtoeretcr is a battle cry, it's a belief system, it is a cultural intidtey that is rooted in the innreeht respect for women. Right now, as we sit in this auditorium, we have wmeon and bad-ass men all over the country, marching, standing at their capital, saying that this is the shift - (Applause) (Cheers) saying that this is the shift that our country wants to make, and it's easy for us to sit in an aiurtdioum, and it's easy for us to hear these different talks and to be inspired by them, but the truth is, this kind of audacious shift in culture is going to demand that the warrior, that the gladiator, that the protector in you and in me rises to the occasion to create a new definition of normal, where girls, and women, and all people are treated with dignity and respect. Because the truth is that men are not simply the problem when it comes to violence against women, they're also the cure, and we have never needed them so much. So, for the real men out there, consider this your invitation. Thank you so much. (Applause) (Cheers)

Open Cloze

"Here we go, we're going to have this conversation." Then I click the next slide, and I said, "But it's different when it's her." And I memorized ten to fifteen names, I said, "It's different when it's _____, and when it's ______, and when it's Jenny." And now these guys are looking at their 16-year-old sister. Half the guys in the room _______ crying. We have to reframe this issue to make this _________ personal to them. Number three, we have to have a conversation about respect. You can't give something that you don't have. We have to imbue these young men with more self-respect, so that they're able to _____ others with more dignity. What dawned on me was that we are not ________ enough emotional education in school right now, we are certainly not teaching these young men how to ______ an _________ confidence, so they are ________ it from exactly where they know how. Through performance, through popularity, and through possessions. We have to broaden a definition of __________ that is not contingent on social media highlight reels and external __________. Number four: We have to have real talk with these guys. I have yet to come into a locker room where they use _____ like "consent" and "bystander." Those are words that we use, in our shiny star studded PSAs. I have yet to hear of a guy come in, and raise his hand, and be like, "There's this really great opportunity for us, bystanders, to intervene." (Laughter) I have never heard of a guy be like, "We were in the middle of hooking up, I'm not _____ lie, I ______, I was like, 'I just wanna make sure that I officially have your consent moving forward.'" (Laughter) That's not me poking fun at the intention behind these words. That's just we have to give them real language and real tools for the _______ that we are asking them to be brave. We have to work with them, and be in conversation with them, to offer them language when they see something sketchy, being able to say, "Yo, we don't do that." That in the ______ of hooking up, to give them ________ like, "Yo, I just wanna make sure that you're cool with us having sex." Because as long as we're talking to them like academic robots, I think we're setting them up to fail. And as far as a few calls to action, anyone in media, please stop crucifying coaches and universities when this stuff happens in their locker room; we're at pandemic levels, this is happening everywhere. Instead, just celebrate the universities who are doing it right, so that we can inspire others to follow suit. For _______ and educators, please invest in programs like these, that are preventative medicine, we cannot continue to triage these symptoms, putting band-aids on bullet wounds. For _______ out there, you hold all the _____ in your _______. Demand that, in order for you to pay _______, these schools have to invest in the safety of both your daughters and your sons. For ________ out there, ask your administration to invest in these kinds of ________. And for _______ athletes out there, say that you are not going to sign with any __________ that isn't making prevention a ________. For policy makers out there, if you have to have a driver's license to drive a car, why would you not have to take a _________ sexual assault __________ program, in order to attend a college or play sports? For the National League team owners, would you be so audacious as to sign a ProtectHer pledge that says that you won't draft any students who have ______ _______ ___________. To be a professional athlete is a privilege, it's a real-life superhero in this country, and you literally have the _______ to change the ______ game with those kinds of standards. ______, __________ is a battle cry, it's a belief system, it is a cultural ________ that is rooted in the ________ respect for women. Right now, as we sit in this auditorium, we have _____ and bad-ass men all over the country, marching, standing at their capital, saying that this is the shift - (Applause) (Cheers) saying that this is the shift that our country wants to make, and it's easy for us to sit in an __________, and it's easy for us to hear these different talks and to be inspired by them, but the truth is, this kind of audacious shift in culture is going to demand that the warrior, that the gladiator, that the protector in you and in me rises to the occasion to create a new definition of normal, where girls, and women, and all people are treated with dignity and respect. Because the truth is that men are not simply the problem when it comes to violence against women, they're also the cure, and we have never needed them so much. So, for the real men out there, consider this your invitation. Thank you so much. (Applause) (Cheers)

Solution

  1. mandatory
  2. words
  3. moments
  4. paused
  5. middle
  6. lastly
  7. sexual
  8. sarah
  9. confidence
  10. lauren
  11. extremely
  12. create
  13. priority
  14. started
  15. parents
  16. treat
  17. teaching
  18. convictions
  19. ability
  20. power
  21. students
  22. gonna
  23. tuition
  24. wallets
  25. assault
  26. student
  27. authentic
  28. identity
  29. women
  30. entire
  31. language
  32. coaches
  33. protecther
  34. university
  35. programs
  36. sourcing
  37. inherent
  38. validation
  39. prevention
  40. auditorium

Original Text

"Here we go, we're going to have this conversation." Then I click the next slide, and I said, "But it's different when it's her." And I memorized ten to fifteen names, I said, "It's different when it's Sarah, and when it's Lauren, and when it's Jenny." And now these guys are looking at their 16-year-old sister. Half the guys in the room started crying. We have to reframe this issue to make this extremely personal to them. Number three, we have to have a conversation about respect. You can't give something that you don't have. We have to imbue these young men with more self-respect, so that they're able to treat others with more dignity. What dawned on me was that we are not teaching enough emotional education in school right now, we are certainly not teaching these young men how to create an authentic confidence, so they are sourcing it from exactly where they know how. Through performance, through popularity, and through possessions. We have to broaden a definition of confidence that is not contingent on social media highlight reels and external validation. Number four: We have to have real talk with these guys. I have yet to come into a locker room where they use words like "consent" and "bystander." Those are words that we use, in our shiny star studded PSAs. I have yet to hear of a guy come in, and raise his hand, and be like, "There's this really great opportunity for us, bystanders, to intervene." (Laughter) I have never heard of a guy be like, "We were in the middle of hooking up, I'm not gonna lie, I paused, I was like, 'I just wanna make sure that I officially have your consent moving forward.'" (Laughter) That's not me poking fun at the intention behind these words. That's just we have to give them real language and real tools for the moments that we are asking them to be brave. We have to work with them, and be in conversation with them, to offer them language when they see something sketchy, being able to say, "Yo, we don't do that." That in the middle of hooking up, to give them language like, "Yo, I just wanna make sure that you're cool with us having sex." Because as long as we're talking to them like academic robots, I think we're setting them up to fail. And as far as a few calls to action, anyone in media, please stop crucifying coaches and universities when this stuff happens in their locker room; we're at pandemic levels, this is happening everywhere. Instead, just celebrate the universities who are doing it right, so that we can inspire others to follow suit. For coaches and educators, please invest in programs like these, that are preventative medicine, we cannot continue to triage these symptoms, putting band-aids on bullet wounds. For parents out there, you hold all the power in your wallets. Demand that, in order for you to pay tuition, these schools have to invest in the safety of both your daughters and your sons. For students out there, ask your administration to invest in these kinds of programs. And for student athletes out there, say that you are not going to sign with any university that isn't making prevention a priority. For policy makers out there, if you have to have a driver's license to drive a car, why would you not have to take a mandatory sexual assault prevention program, in order to attend a college or play sports? For the National League team owners, would you be so audacious as to sign a ProtectHer pledge that says that you won't draft any students who have sexual assault convictions. To be a professional athlete is a privilege, it's a real-life superhero in this country, and you literally have the ability to change the entire game with those kinds of standards. Lastly, ProtectHer is a battle cry, it's a belief system, it is a cultural identity that is rooted in the inherent respect for women. Right now, as we sit in this auditorium, we have women and bad-ass men all over the country, marching, standing at their capital, saying that this is the shift - (Applause) (Cheers) saying that this is the shift that our country wants to make, and it's easy for us to sit in an auditorium, and it's easy for us to hear these different talks and to be inspired by them, but the truth is, this kind of audacious shift in culture is going to demand that the warrior, that the gladiator, that the protector in you and in me rises to the occasion to create a new definition of normal, where girls, and women, and all people are treated with dignity and respect. Because the truth is that men are not simply the problem when it comes to violence against women, they're also the cure, and we have never needed them so much. So, for the real men out there, consider this your invitation. Thank you so much. (Applause) (Cheers)

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
young men 9
locker rooms 6
locker room 6
sexual assault 3

Important Words

  1. ability
  2. academic
  3. action
  4. administration
  5. applause
  6. assault
  7. athlete
  8. athletes
  9. attend
  10. audacious
  11. auditorium
  12. authentic
  13. battle
  14. belief
  15. brave
  16. broaden
  17. bullet
  18. bystanders
  19. calls
  20. capital
  21. car
  22. celebrate
  23. change
  24. cheers
  25. click
  26. coaches
  27. college
  28. confidence
  29. consent
  30. contingent
  31. continue
  32. conversation
  33. convictions
  34. cool
  35. country
  36. create
  37. crucifying
  38. cry
  39. crying
  40. cultural
  41. culture
  42. cure
  43. daughters
  44. dawned
  45. definition
  46. demand
  47. dignity
  48. draft
  49. drive
  50. easy
  51. education
  52. educators
  53. emotional
  54. entire
  55. external
  56. extremely
  57. fail
  58. fifteen
  59. follow
  60. fun
  61. game
  62. girls
  63. give
  64. gladiator
  65. gonna
  66. great
  67. guy
  68. guys
  69. hand
  70. happening
  71. hear
  72. heard
  73. highlight
  74. hold
  75. hooking
  76. identity
  77. imbue
  78. inherent
  79. inspire
  80. inspired
  81. intention
  82. intervene
  83. invest
  84. invitation
  85. issue
  86. jenny
  87. kind
  88. kinds
  89. language
  90. lastly
  91. laughter
  92. lauren
  93. league
  94. levels
  95. license
  96. lie
  97. literally
  98. locker
  99. long
  100. makers
  101. making
  102. mandatory
  103. marching
  104. media
  105. medicine
  106. memorized
  107. men
  108. middle
  109. moments
  110. moving
  111. names
  112. national
  113. needed
  114. normal
  115. number
  116. occasion
  117. offer
  118. officially
  119. opportunity
  120. order
  121. owners
  122. pandemic
  123. parents
  124. paused
  125. pay
  126. people
  127. performance
  128. personal
  129. play
  130. pledge
  131. poking
  132. policy
  133. popularity
  134. possessions
  135. power
  136. preventative
  137. prevention
  138. priority
  139. privilege
  140. problem
  141. professional
  142. program
  143. programs
  144. protecther
  145. protector
  146. psas
  147. putting
  148. raise
  149. real
  150. reels
  151. reframe
  152. respect
  153. rises
  154. robots
  155. room
  156. rooted
  157. safety
  158. sarah
  159. school
  160. schools
  161. setting
  162. sex
  163. sexual
  164. shift
  165. shiny
  166. sign
  167. simply
  168. sister
  169. sit
  170. sketchy
  171. slide
  172. social
  173. sons
  174. sourcing
  175. sports
  176. standards
  177. standing
  178. star
  179. started
  180. stop
  181. studded
  182. student
  183. students
  184. stuff
  185. suit
  186. superhero
  187. symptoms
  188. system
  189. talk
  190. talking
  191. talks
  192. teaching
  193. team
  194. ten
  195. tools
  196. treat
  197. treated
  198. triage
  199. truth
  200. tuition
  201. universities
  202. university
  203. validation
  204. violence
  205. wallets
  206. wanna
  207. warrior
  208. women
  209. words
  210. work
  211. wounds
  212. young