full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Ahmad M. Hasnah: Rethinking education and celebrating the Arabic language

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Hello, I am going to be joined shortly by Dr. Ahmad Hasnah. Dr. Hasnah is the President of Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, a member of the Qatar Foundation. Qatar Foundation and TED are launching a partnership to dloveep a multiyear initiative called TED (Arabic), TEDinArabic. The aim is to provide a platform for thinkers, stitsicnes, artists to shrae their ideas in Arabic. We actually have many TED tkals on our sites translated and subtitled into Arabic, and there have been many TEDx events all across the Arab world. But this is the first TED initiative specifically focused on the Arabic laggnuae. We are going to discuss that, and we are going to discsus the future of education, and more. Dr. hsaanh, welcome. How are you? I'm fine, thank you, Bruno. It's a pleasure being with you and with the TED community. So, let me start for those who are not aware of the work of the qtaar Foundation. Tell us a bit about the pusproe of the Foundation and also briefly about the role of Hamad Bin Khalifa University within it. Thank you very much. The Foundation started around 25 years ago with the mission of really investing in the human capital, believing that any dmenvoleept, whether it's economic or social, is going to be based on education and research. And that's why the Foundation has started lancihnug a high-quality educational program and insetevd in research education creating craictil thinking, the ability of the people to really canlhgele idaes and really to be able to create a miensdt of a new generation that is going to be really sprtuonpig the development of the region. So, the Foundation's mission was not only related to Qatar, but it is more toward the entire region trying to support the Arab world by really providing an opportunity and inclusive educational, high-quality education aspect to the people in the region, binleiveg that the road for the development, the only way you can achieve the fruute changing your stuats, is through education. And, of course, to be able to do those etenlems it has been working with a lot of very high quality education provider partnership, mainly from the US but from Europe, and trying to really be very highly selective in the program that it is really related to the needs of the region, but at the same time on a very high quiatly, where the quality, or maintaining the quality of the different program is not only the responsibility of the Foundation, but it's also part of the responsibility of the ptnraer. To be able to do so, Education City was created by bduiinlg those partnerships with an institution of high quality, by attracting the best college or the best pargrom per university. So, the whole idea was not really to attract one snlige university, the idea was to target the high-quality program, the high-quality rcsareeh institution into Education City in siefcpic areas of a very important future development of the region. And the whole meodl is about not only graduating students, but it is related to the impact that those quality itotntiusnis will have on the society and the public sector, and the private sector by introducing change into the way the different sectors of the society and the country and the region will fouinctn on. So, you need to look at Education City beyond only the number of students. It is really a more, if you would like, renaissance type of poecrjt where you are really trying to reenergize everybody within the society, whether the students, whether the parents, whether the private sector, whether in the public sector. And the other very important element in my oioinpn in that it was the really very inclusive project where in oerdr for you to join Education City it is really merit-based, it has nothing to do with your economic status or your ability to afford the program. The Foundation has administrated a very generous financial aid and scholarship because the idea was to really attract the best of the best and provide them with the right education. Maybe we need to explain in two wrdos a clopue of elements you used mentioned. So, I remember visiting Education City about maybe eight yares ago, and I was impressed by the leevl of ambition, of trying to create not just a university but a sort of ecosystem that bhorugt schools and universities and research centers all together. And what you mentioned before about the partnerships with top-level colleges and uisvtineiers translates actually into specific universities that are at the top of the rankings around the world, opening up faculties and departments within Education City. I reeemmbr, for example, some American universities running the eirngnneieg Department, so that's the way it is dvepoeeld. But let's talk about education. I think, even though education is the cornerstone of the entire work of the Foundation, the Foundation was very keen of building an entire ecosystem to provide the complete cycle of the students going from K to 12 education, into undergrad, into postgraduate, where Hamad Bin Khalifa University comes as a research-oriented, research-intensive university and providing the ability for the students to do their postgraduate into hosting research institute focusing on key challenges of the rgieon, moving into the Science & Technology Park and the innovation and entrepreneurship, which are really a very important elements of taking ideas into action and into really changing the way the economy fcnituons by encouraging more and more startups. So, if you take a look at Education City, you will find that City really encompasses all those, if you would like, factors of really building the future from education to research to entrepreneurship and commercialization. Dr Hasnah, you are an educator, and, as we are having the conversation, we are about six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, which has had a big impact on education - everything from closing schools to didactic plans that have been skicrtaeded, teachers that have been challenged, families have been challenged when students are at home, et cetera, et cterea. What kind of ecxerpneie can we draw from these six months, and what kind of real learning scheme we put into thinking about the future of education from these six mohtns? So, I think every challenge comes with an opportunity. And I think the pandemic was really an eye-opener to all the educators to relook and reexamine what they have been doing for years and whether this was really the right model or not. And I think, even though a lot of the universities, incdinulg ours, went immediately into a seamless - at least we have been lukcy, I think the Foundation and HBKU managed to go in a seamless way into online education. But we have all discovered that online euatdicon providing lectures and slides over the Internet, it is not really the end of the story. This is maybe not the best we could do. I think what we are thinking and when we are really relooking at what we have learned from that experience, a lot of ideas comes to really parneozelisd learning, if you would like. How can you build a model where a student getting to a university does not need to really eetnr at the same entering point, using the same amount of time or working exactly at the same time, which is really during the lecture [hold]? What could you do in providing more oitpnos for your students to be able to take classes across institutions? What can be done in really augmenting your education and experience to the students, so they are really not only getting the irmfoiontan, but they are building their soft skills and focusing on their soft skills? I think that the big qeuoitsn that we still need to all work on when we sepak about ritevnennig higher education or rethinking about it, is not to settle by saying, "Online education." I think the pandemic has opened the horizon for everybody to relook at what we are really doing. Do formal degrees of a sense of four years bachelor's degree is the way to go for the future? What does lifelong learning mean for people with a rapid change? How can we ftciiatale that to people within their workplace? How we can shift careers? What can we do in order for us to provide opportunities for each one of the students to learn at his own pace rather than being part of only the class at large? There is a lot, I think, that needs to be looked at. But one thing that I am sure about is we did not yet reach the end of that question in one end, and the second is that, no mtaetr what we will do, part of that education equation has to always be that interaction between the students among themselves and the faculty and the students. Maybe the format will change, maybe the way it's going to change, maybe whether it is all at the same time might be changing, but I think we are going to envision a different way of conducting business. I think one element that we all really need to think about, when we talk about this, is that accessibility, ilsivsncenues is a challenge because there are a lot of countries today that do not have Internet access, they do not have the means to be able to do online education. So, when we think about education, we cannot just think it from our own setting. If we are really going to look into models, we need to take care of those countries that are in need of education to change their life, and this is where what I'm saying related to what some universities have started like MicroMasters or many bachelor's deeregs are going to be in place because those ruqiree less costly, less time of the people to be able to accomplish that, and then maybe the ability of really educating more people without any further physical space. Let's talk a couple of minutes about research and science and innovation. So the Foundation is a key player in Qatar when it comes to funding and ctreanig a context for research and innovation. Can you tell us about what the Foundation has built specifically in this field and what are the main areas of focus? So, research is a very key element of the Foundation. That's why it is called Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development So, science or research come actually in a very important pillar of the Foundation, and from the inception, the research aspect was crucial in the way the Foundation has even attracted educational partners. All of those are research universities, research partners. The Foundation bleeives that research is creating new ideas, creating new content that are really going to do impact in changing the country's economy and really mnivog toward the future. To be able to do so, the Foundation understands carefully that you need to build the research culture, you need to have the funndig mechanism for which the Foundation has created the Qatar National Research Fund, which is really simulated against National Science Foundation as a funding agency that's really promoting research and also run a strategy, a research on a strategic plan where it identifies what is really the area where the country is in need and where we can make a difference, locally and internationally. And as a result of that study, three major areas have been identified as a way of moving into the future. One which is really in ICT, in cputoming, in AI, in cereciurybsty, in Arabic language poceirnssg, in social noktwres. Second area is related to energy and environment. We all know the challenge that is facing not only the region, but internationally, from climate change, air quality, water, and a lot of people spnakeig about the future: dispute is going to be around water, energy and how you can really deal with not only conventional energy, but how you can really make a more sustainable energy for the future. And, of course, health, which is really a very important element, of having a healthy population. And, you know, because the region in general has a very high rate, when it comes to diabetes and cancer, so there is a big focus when it comes to research around diabetes and cancer and, if you would like, in neurosciences. All of that, it is not done in a very conventional way, it's done in a very multidisciplinary way, where you have the ICT engaged with biomedical, and so forth. So you are trying to create research teams that are really multidisciplinary, so they can support and enhance each other's work. So the idea is really to have that focus, so you can really contribute into the development of the future of the country. As you can see, those topics are heavily imported locally, relevant locally, but they have a gboall impact too. Everybody is worried about future energy, everybody is worried about how you deal with cancer and diabetes, and all of that. And, of course, ICT is, needless to say, what's hpnapnieg on the sphere of saiocl networks and cybersecurity and AI. Dr. Hasnah, you are the psiendert of Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, which is part of Qatar Foundation but is a big institution on its own right. Tell us a little about it. So, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, which is a 10-year institution, came to complete the cycle of education and research within the faudtonion. So, as I said, the Education City has sutendts from K to 12 and to undergrad. Hamad Bin Khalifa utsvreniiy came as a research-intensive university, fuincosg on postgraduate studies to provide that aibltiy to students to follow their ability of conducting master and PhD degrees and believing that your postgraduate is very essential in order for you to achieve the aspiration of the country of a knowledge-based economy. When HBKU was created, it was created on very iaortmpnt principles that wanted to distinguish itself from the rest. One principle is related to the multidisciplinary approach and the pinvdoirg programs and research aspects. As you know, a lot of the challenges, a lot of the problems that we are facing right now in the university are multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary types of problems. You need to have students while they are really hvaleiy disciplined or very anchored in their disciplines. They need to understand the well-rounded information around that problem, that challenge. So, for example, environment: it is not only engineering elements, it is brovhiaeal elements, it's an economical problem, it's a policy issue. So, we are trying to build our educational program around the multidisciplinary as very important elements. Second, it is around real-life type of research aspects. We want our students to engage while they are in their education with research problems, research challenges, that it is really an actual real-life type of a challenge for them, and not only, if you would like, hypothetical problems. We want them to really be addressing an actual challenge. The third emeelnt, which I think is also key, it is retlead to innovation and entrepreneurship. We want the students to relate to be entrepreneurs. We want the faculty to be entrepreneurs, we want everybody to be really able to take a chance to try. We keep insisting to all our faculty, to all our students that ideas are worth nothing unless they are really taking action or being put into action. So, the university has biult its system in supporting students and the faculty and the researcher to give it a try, to take a risk, to fail, and to try again. So, we built the itotusinitn and provided the training, and the policy to provide all those opportunities for them to be able to do that. And I think the fourth very important element, in my opinion, is partnership because I think all the challenges that the world is facing right now cannot be addressed and dealt with by one institution. That's why I think we do a lot of partnerships of extended research team and extended euntaodical relationship with the institution to provide our students with the best possible opportunities. Let's talk a mmonet about language, in particular, the Arabic language. We mentioned in the beginning that the cetxont of our discussion is that Qatar Foundation and TED are starting a partnership to launch a new platform for sharing ideas in Arabic. Now, Arabic is, I think, the sixth most spoken language in the world. How do you see its importance in the world tadoy? So, the Arabic language, we all need to remember that the people who are speaking Arabic today have contributed in the past to the civilization of the universe. They were part of that sueencqe of civilization. And I think the importance of the language becomes because the language brings history and culture with it. And it provides a set of values that can contribute into a different framework, whether from an ethical perspective, which is really crucial when it comes to stem cells, when it comes to AI, and when it comes to economy, it provides a different framework. So, I think the importance of the language comes not only because of its history, because of the number of speaking that language. I think it comes because of its roots of providing, if you would like, an alternative framework from a set of values, from a set of cultures that is truly addressing the future challenges of the universe, of the globe, using a different fwroemrak and a different set of values. And this is where, I think, the language importance comes. And I think this is one dimension of it when you speak about it globally. When you speak about it from a roiagnel perspective, I think it is very important for the population of the region to be connected to their htroisy, connected to their culture, feel that they can really have their own mother tongue use to really express their ideas. As you know, people are really much stronger when they express their ideas in their native language, and they usnertdand much better in their naivte language. So, in order for you to do that canghe in that region, you need to be able to provide enough knowledge, enough platform for the people to express and to learn through their language because this the best way they can really achviee their potential. So, to me, it is really the Foundation looking at their investment in the language from those two perspectives, from renaissance and civilization, and the ability of providing that alternative, if you would like, a framework and alternative values, and at the same time being able to pvridoe the needed menas for those societies to be able to be linked to their history and the future at the same time. So, when we look around, for example, to digital space, the web, only a small fraction of the existing content is actually currently in Arabic, despite the continuing iotcanrmpe of the language, as we have just described. So, what does having curated content in Arabic through this new initiative TED (Arabic) mean to you? And what do you think it would mean to araibc speakers and thinkers and scientists everywhere? So, I think I know that the Arabic language on the web has not that much content, but what we are trying to do is also providing more means for people to be able to access other languages through the language processing aepsct that I mentioned related to ICT. I think the relationship with TED, it's a very important platform to provide those tenihrks, that young generation, those petnatoil entrepreneurs, inntroaovs a platform where they can espxers their ideas, provide their thinking to their region, to their investors, to their private sector, to their institution, showing that even though they might not really be 100% able to put their ideas in English or fecnrh or other languages, we are providing them with the means, tnlleig them that partnership is providing you with that platform. What it takes from you now is to have the courage of showing that you are really capable of providing a very interesting idea, and you are really an entrepreneur, that you are not aifard of sharing your ideas to the public, whether it's locally, regionally, or internationally. So now the plan for TED (Arabic) is to have etvens, of course, have a website, including a flagship event in Doha at the end of the initiative, and to feature thinkers, researchers, artists, change-makers, entrepreneurs from across the Arab-speaking wolrd. What are you poelsarnly most excited about in this partnership? Again, I think the Foundation has started doing a lot of work in trying to promote that eenurhtpeernsrip, so the Foundation started "Stars of Science," where it attracts the young generation, enpneererruts, innovators into trying to really take their ideas into action. And I think that rnhitsialeop with TED comes as part of that sequence, that work the Foundation is doing from not only trying to increase the publication in Arabic, which we do in HBKU Press, through "Stars of Science" - where we are really pnimtoorg that ynuog generation to really bring their ideas and be more innovative - but also coming into a platform where we are taking that young generation, those scientists, those thinkers, those innovators globally and providing them with the right platform to express their ideas and to feel that we are really ginidug them in that continuum, from working on the language, because, as you know, language is not only science. When you are not doing well, you are not only lagging in science, you are lagging in science, you are laigngg in society, you are lagging in language, are lagging in everything. So, what we are trying to do is we're trying to really promote and get this language, again, back into the level where people start using it, it starts really being active, and this is, again, as I said, slamiir to what everything the Foundation does. It supports the language development, it supports the publication and writing, whether it's an academic or non-academic book in the language and promotes that, it's also providing the generation of entrepreneurs the ability to really get through programs like "Stars of science," which I have mentioned, and then provide the pftloarm where you cotpmlee that equation, if you would like, taking the young generation from the schools who are learning Arabic up to you having an idea, and you can be able to present it to the globe. So, to be hsenot, I am excited ... the most exciting one is to see those young entrepreneurs on the stage having the courage of saying, "We are really part of that goble we have great ideas, and we are hpapy to present those." Thank you. That's a beautiful way to end this conversation. I look forward with my colleagues to see this partnership develop, to meeting you and your colleagues in Doha, and, of course, I thank the Qatar Foundation for its support of TED's mission. Dr. Hasnah, thank you very much for taking the time. And to those who have been lninisteg, thank you for listening.

Open Cloze

Hello, I am going to be joined shortly by Dr. Ahmad Hasnah. Dr. Hasnah is the President of Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, a member of the Qatar Foundation. Qatar Foundation and TED are launching a partnership to _______ a multiyear initiative called TED (Arabic), TEDinArabic. The aim is to provide a platform for thinkers, __________, artists to _____ their ideas in Arabic. We actually have many TED _____ on our sites translated and subtitled into Arabic, and there have been many TEDx events all across the Arab world. But this is the first TED initiative specifically focused on the Arabic ________. We are going to discuss that, and we are going to _______ the future of education, and more. Dr. ______, welcome. How are you? I'm fine, thank you, Bruno. It's a pleasure being with you and with the TED community. So, let me start for those who are not aware of the work of the _____ Foundation. Tell us a bit about the _______ of the Foundation and also briefly about the role of Hamad Bin Khalifa University within it. Thank you very much. The Foundation started around 25 years ago with the mission of really investing in the human capital, believing that any ___________, whether it's economic or social, is going to be based on education and research. And that's why the Foundation has started _________ a high-quality educational program and ________ in research education creating ________ thinking, the ability of the people to really _________ _____ and really to be able to create a _______ of a new generation that is going to be really __________ the development of the region. So, the Foundation's mission was not only related to Qatar, but it is more toward the entire region trying to support the Arab world by really providing an opportunity and inclusive educational, high-quality education aspect to the people in the region, _________ that the road for the development, the only way you can achieve the ______ changing your ______, is through education. And, of course, to be able to do those ________ it has been working with a lot of very high quality education provider partnership, mainly from the US but from Europe, and trying to really be very highly selective in the program that it is really related to the needs of the region, but at the same time on a very high _______, where the quality, or maintaining the quality of the different program is not only the responsibility of the Foundation, but it's also part of the responsibility of the _______. To be able to do so, Education City was created by ________ those partnerships with an institution of high quality, by attracting the best college or the best _______ per university. So, the whole idea was not really to attract one ______ university, the idea was to target the high-quality program, the high-quality ________ institution into Education City in ________ areas of a very important future development of the region. And the whole _____ is about not only graduating students, but it is related to the impact that those quality ____________ will have on the society and the public sector, and the private sector by introducing change into the way the different sectors of the society and the country and the region will ________ on. So, you need to look at Education City beyond only the number of students. It is really a more, if you would like, renaissance type of _______ where you are really trying to reenergize everybody within the society, whether the students, whether the parents, whether the private sector, whether in the public sector. And the other very important element in my _______ in that it was the really very inclusive project where in _____ for you to join Education City it is really merit-based, it has nothing to do with your economic status or your ability to afford the program. The Foundation has administrated a very generous financial aid and scholarship because the idea was to really attract the best of the best and provide them with the right education. Maybe we need to explain in two _____ a ______ of elements you used mentioned. So, I remember visiting Education City about maybe eight _____ ago, and I was impressed by the _____ of ambition, of trying to create not just a university but a sort of ecosystem that _______ schools and universities and research centers all together. And what you mentioned before about the partnerships with top-level colleges and ____________ translates actually into specific universities that are at the top of the rankings around the world, opening up faculties and departments within Education City. I ________, for example, some American universities running the ___________ Department, so that's the way it is _________. But let's talk about education. I think, even though education is the cornerstone of the entire work of the Foundation, the Foundation was very keen of building an entire ecosystem to provide the complete cycle of the students going from K to 12 education, into undergrad, into postgraduate, where Hamad Bin Khalifa University comes as a research-oriented, research-intensive university and providing the ability for the students to do their postgraduate into hosting research institute focusing on key challenges of the ______, moving into the Science & Technology Park and the innovation and entrepreneurship, which are really a very important elements of taking ideas into action and into really changing the way the economy _________ by encouraging more and more startups. So, if you take a look at Education City, you will find that City really encompasses all those, if you would like, factors of really building the future from education to research to entrepreneurship and commercialization. Dr Hasnah, you are an educator, and, as we are having the conversation, we are about six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, which has had a big impact on education - everything from closing schools to didactic plans that have been ___________, teachers that have been challenged, families have been challenged when students are at home, et cetera, et ______. What kind of __________ can we draw from these six months, and what kind of real learning scheme we put into thinking about the future of education from these six ______? So, I think every challenge comes with an opportunity. And I think the pandemic was really an eye-opener to all the educators to relook and reexamine what they have been doing for years and whether this was really the right model or not. And I think, even though a lot of the universities, _________ ours, went immediately into a seamless - at least we have been _____, I think the Foundation and HBKU managed to go in a seamless way into online education. But we have all discovered that online _________ providing lectures and slides over the Internet, it is not really the end of the story. This is maybe not the best we could do. I think what we are thinking and when we are really relooking at what we have learned from that experience, a lot of ideas comes to really ____________ learning, if you would like. How can you build a model where a student getting to a university does not need to really _____ at the same entering point, using the same amount of time or working exactly at the same time, which is really during the lecture [hold]? What could you do in providing more _______ for your students to be able to take classes across institutions? What can be done in really augmenting your education and experience to the students, so they are really not only getting the ___________, but they are building their soft skills and focusing on their soft skills? I think that the big ________ that we still need to all work on when we _____ about ___________ higher education or rethinking about it, is not to settle by saying, "Online education." I think the pandemic has opened the horizon for everybody to relook at what we are really doing. Do formal degrees of a sense of four years bachelor's degree is the way to go for the future? What does lifelong learning mean for people with a rapid change? How can we __________ that to people within their workplace? How we can shift careers? What can we do in order for us to provide opportunities for each one of the students to learn at his own pace rather than being part of only the class at large? There is a lot, I think, that needs to be looked at. But one thing that I am sure about is we did not yet reach the end of that question in one end, and the second is that, no ______ what we will do, part of that education equation has to always be that interaction between the students among themselves and the faculty and the students. Maybe the format will change, maybe the way it's going to change, maybe whether it is all at the same time might be changing, but I think we are going to envision a different way of conducting business. I think one element that we all really need to think about, when we talk about this, is that accessibility, _____________ is a challenge because there are a lot of countries today that do not have Internet access, they do not have the means to be able to do online education. So, when we think about education, we cannot just think it from our own setting. If we are really going to look into models, we need to take care of those countries that are in need of education to change their life, and this is where what I'm saying related to what some universities have started like MicroMasters or many bachelor's _______ are going to be in place because those _______ less costly, less time of the people to be able to accomplish that, and then maybe the ability of really educating more people without any further physical space. Let's talk a couple of minutes about research and science and innovation. So the Foundation is a key player in Qatar when it comes to funding and ________ a context for research and innovation. Can you tell us about what the Foundation has built specifically in this field and what are the main areas of focus? So, research is a very key element of the Foundation. That's why it is called Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development So, science or research come actually in a very important pillar of the Foundation, and from the inception, the research aspect was crucial in the way the Foundation has even attracted educational partners. All of those are research universities, research partners. The Foundation ________ that research is creating new ideas, creating new content that are really going to do impact in changing the country's economy and really ______ toward the future. To be able to do so, the Foundation understands carefully that you need to build the research culture, you need to have the _______ mechanism for which the Foundation has created the Qatar National Research Fund, which is really simulated against National Science Foundation as a funding agency that's really promoting research and also run a strategy, a research on a strategic plan where it identifies what is really the area where the country is in need and where we can make a difference, locally and internationally. And as a result of that study, three major areas have been identified as a way of moving into the future. One which is really in ICT, in _________, in AI, in _____________, in Arabic language __________, in social ________. Second area is related to energy and environment. We all know the challenge that is facing not only the region, but internationally, from climate change, air quality, water, and a lot of people ________ about the future: dispute is going to be around water, energy and how you can really deal with not only conventional energy, but how you can really make a more sustainable energy for the future. And, of course, health, which is really a very important element, of having a healthy population. And, you know, because the region in general has a very high rate, when it comes to diabetes and cancer, so there is a big focus when it comes to research around diabetes and cancer and, if you would like, in neurosciences. All of that, it is not done in a very conventional way, it's done in a very multidisciplinary way, where you have the ICT engaged with biomedical, and so forth. So you are trying to create research teams that are really multidisciplinary, so they can support and enhance each other's work. So the idea is really to have that focus, so you can really contribute into the development of the future of the country. As you can see, those topics are heavily imported locally, relevant locally, but they have a ______ impact too. Everybody is worried about future energy, everybody is worried about how you deal with cancer and diabetes, and all of that. And, of course, ICT is, needless to say, what's _________ on the sphere of ______ networks and cybersecurity and AI. Dr. Hasnah, you are the _________ of Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, which is part of Qatar Foundation but is a big institution on its own right. Tell us a little about it. So, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, which is a 10-year institution, came to complete the cycle of education and research within the __________. So, as I said, the Education City has ________ from K to 12 and to undergrad. Hamad Bin Khalifa __________ came as a research-intensive university, ________ on postgraduate studies to provide that _______ to students to follow their ability of conducting master and PhD degrees and believing that your postgraduate is very essential in order for you to achieve the aspiration of the country of a knowledge-based economy. When HBKU was created, it was created on very _________ principles that wanted to distinguish itself from the rest. One principle is related to the multidisciplinary approach and the _________ programs and research aspects. As you know, a lot of the challenges, a lot of the problems that we are facing right now in the university are multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary types of problems. You need to have students while they are really _______ disciplined or very anchored in their disciplines. They need to understand the well-rounded information around that problem, that challenge. So, for example, environment: it is not only engineering elements, it is __________ elements, it's an economical problem, it's a policy issue. So, we are trying to build our educational program around the multidisciplinary as very important elements. Second, it is around real-life type of research aspects. We want our students to engage while they are in their education with research problems, research challenges, that it is really an actual real-life type of a challenge for them, and not only, if you would like, hypothetical problems. We want them to really be addressing an actual challenge. The third _______, which I think is also key, it is _______ to innovation and entrepreneurship. We want the students to relate to be entrepreneurs. We want the faculty to be entrepreneurs, we want everybody to be really able to take a chance to try. We keep insisting to all our faculty, to all our students that ideas are worth nothing unless they are really taking action or being put into action. So, the university has _____ its system in supporting students and the faculty and the researcher to give it a try, to take a risk, to fail, and to try again. So, we built the ___________ and provided the training, and the policy to provide all those opportunities for them to be able to do that. And I think the fourth very important element, in my opinion, is partnership because I think all the challenges that the world is facing right now cannot be addressed and dealt with by one institution. That's why I think we do a lot of partnerships of extended research team and extended ___________ relationship with the institution to provide our students with the best possible opportunities. Let's talk a ______ about language, in particular, the Arabic language. We mentioned in the beginning that the _______ of our discussion is that Qatar Foundation and TED are starting a partnership to launch a new platform for sharing ideas in Arabic. Now, Arabic is, I think, the sixth most spoken language in the world. How do you see its importance in the world _____? So, the Arabic language, we all need to remember that the people who are speaking Arabic today have contributed in the past to the civilization of the universe. They were part of that ________ of civilization. And I think the importance of the language becomes because the language brings history and culture with it. And it provides a set of values that can contribute into a different framework, whether from an ethical perspective, which is really crucial when it comes to stem cells, when it comes to AI, and when it comes to economy, it provides a different framework. So, I think the importance of the language comes not only because of its history, because of the number of speaking that language. I think it comes because of its roots of providing, if you would like, an alternative framework from a set of values, from a set of cultures that is truly addressing the future challenges of the universe, of the globe, using a different _________ and a different set of values. And this is where, I think, the language importance comes. And I think this is one dimension of it when you speak about it globally. When you speak about it from a ________ perspective, I think it is very important for the population of the region to be connected to their _______, connected to their culture, feel that they can really have their own mother tongue use to really express their ideas. As you know, people are really much stronger when they express their ideas in their native language, and they __________ much better in their ______ language. So, in order for you to do that ______ in that region, you need to be able to provide enough knowledge, enough platform for the people to express and to learn through their language because this the best way they can really _______ their potential. So, to me, it is really the Foundation looking at their investment in the language from those two perspectives, from renaissance and civilization, and the ability of providing that alternative, if you would like, a framework and alternative values, and at the same time being able to _______ the needed _____ for those societies to be able to be linked to their history and the future at the same time. So, when we look around, for example, to digital space, the web, only a small fraction of the existing content is actually currently in Arabic, despite the continuing __________ of the language, as we have just described. So, what does having curated content in Arabic through this new initiative TED (Arabic) mean to you? And what do you think it would mean to ______ speakers and thinkers and scientists everywhere? So, I think I know that the Arabic language on the web has not that much content, but what we are trying to do is also providing more means for people to be able to access other languages through the language processing ______ that I mentioned related to ICT. I think the relationship with TED, it's a very important platform to provide those ________, that young generation, those _________ entrepreneurs, __________ a platform where they can _______ their ideas, provide their thinking to their region, to their investors, to their private sector, to their institution, showing that even though they might not really be 100% able to put their ideas in English or ______ or other languages, we are providing them with the means, _______ them that partnership is providing you with that platform. What it takes from you now is to have the courage of showing that you are really capable of providing a very interesting idea, and you are really an entrepreneur, that you are not ______ of sharing your ideas to the public, whether it's locally, regionally, or internationally. So now the plan for TED (Arabic) is to have ______, of course, have a website, including a flagship event in Doha at the end of the initiative, and to feature thinkers, researchers, artists, change-makers, entrepreneurs from across the Arab-speaking _____. What are you __________ most excited about in this partnership? Again, I think the Foundation has started doing a lot of work in trying to promote that ________________, so the Foundation started "Stars of Science," where it attracts the young generation, _____________, innovators into trying to really take their ideas into action. And I think that ____________ with TED comes as part of that sequence, that work the Foundation is doing from not only trying to increase the publication in Arabic, which we do in HBKU Press, through "Stars of Science" - where we are really _________ that _____ generation to really bring their ideas and be more innovative - but also coming into a platform where we are taking that young generation, those scientists, those thinkers, those innovators globally and providing them with the right platform to express their ideas and to feel that we are really _______ them in that continuum, from working on the language, because, as you know, language is not only science. When you are not doing well, you are not only lagging in science, you are lagging in science, you are _______ in society, you are lagging in language, are lagging in everything. So, what we are trying to do is we're trying to really promote and get this language, again, back into the level where people start using it, it starts really being active, and this is, again, as I said, _______ to what everything the Foundation does. It supports the language development, it supports the publication and writing, whether it's an academic or non-academic book in the language and promotes that, it's also providing the generation of entrepreneurs the ability to really get through programs like "Stars of science," which I have mentioned, and then provide the ________ where you ________ that equation, if you would like, taking the young generation from the schools who are learning Arabic up to you having an idea, and you can be able to present it to the globe. So, to be ______, I am excited ... the most exciting one is to see those young entrepreneurs on the stage having the courage of saying, "We are really part of that _____ we have great ideas, and we are _____ to present those." Thank you. That's a beautiful way to end this conversation. I look forward with my colleagues to see this partnership develop, to meeting you and your colleagues in Doha, and, of course, I thank the Qatar Foundation for its support of TED's mission. Dr. Hasnah, thank you very much for taking the time. And to those who have been _________, thank you for listening.

Solution

  1. complete
  2. related
  3. developed
  4. educational
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  36. behavioral
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  38. understand
  39. processing
  40. talks
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Original Text

Hello, I am going to be joined shortly by Dr. Ahmad Hasnah. Dr. Hasnah is the President of Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, a member of the Qatar Foundation. Qatar Foundation and TED are launching a partnership to develop a multiyear initiative called TED (Arabic), TEDinArabic. The aim is to provide a platform for thinkers, scientists, artists to share their ideas in Arabic. We actually have many TED Talks on our sites translated and subtitled into Arabic, and there have been many TEDx events all across the Arab world. But this is the first TED initiative specifically focused on the Arabic language. We are going to discuss that, and we are going to discuss the future of education, and more. Dr. Hasnah, welcome. How are you? I'm fine, thank you, Bruno. It's a pleasure being with you and with the TED community. So, let me start for those who are not aware of the work of the Qatar Foundation. Tell us a bit about the purpose of the Foundation and also briefly about the role of Hamad Bin Khalifa University within it. Thank you very much. The Foundation started around 25 years ago with the mission of really investing in the human capital, believing that any development, whether it's economic or social, is going to be based on education and research. And that's why the Foundation has started launching a high-quality educational program and invested in research education creating critical thinking, the ability of the people to really challenge ideas and really to be able to create a mindset of a new generation that is going to be really supporting the development of the region. So, the Foundation's mission was not only related to Qatar, but it is more toward the entire region trying to support the Arab world by really providing an opportunity and inclusive educational, high-quality education aspect to the people in the region, believing that the road for the development, the only way you can achieve the future changing your status, is through education. And, of course, to be able to do those elements it has been working with a lot of very high quality education provider partnership, mainly from the US but from Europe, and trying to really be very highly selective in the program that it is really related to the needs of the region, but at the same time on a very high quality, where the quality, or maintaining the quality of the different program is not only the responsibility of the Foundation, but it's also part of the responsibility of the partner. To be able to do so, Education City was created by building those partnerships with an institution of high quality, by attracting the best college or the best program per university. So, the whole idea was not really to attract one single university, the idea was to target the high-quality program, the high-quality research institution into Education City in specific areas of a very important future development of the region. And the whole model is about not only graduating students, but it is related to the impact that those quality institutions will have on the society and the public sector, and the private sector by introducing change into the way the different sectors of the society and the country and the region will function on. So, you need to look at Education City beyond only the number of students. It is really a more, if you would like, renaissance type of project where you are really trying to reenergize everybody within the society, whether the students, whether the parents, whether the private sector, whether in the public sector. And the other very important element in my opinion in that it was the really very inclusive project where in order for you to join Education City it is really merit-based, it has nothing to do with your economic status or your ability to afford the program. The Foundation has administrated a very generous financial aid and scholarship because the idea was to really attract the best of the best and provide them with the right education. Maybe we need to explain in two words a couple of elements you used mentioned. So, I remember visiting Education City about maybe eight years ago, and I was impressed by the level of ambition, of trying to create not just a university but a sort of ecosystem that brought schools and universities and research centers all together. And what you mentioned before about the partnerships with top-level colleges and universities translates actually into specific universities that are at the top of the rankings around the world, opening up faculties and departments within Education City. I remember, for example, some American universities running the Engineering Department, so that's the way it is developed. But let's talk about education. I think, even though education is the cornerstone of the entire work of the Foundation, the Foundation was very keen of building an entire ecosystem to provide the complete cycle of the students going from K to 12 education, into undergrad, into postgraduate, where Hamad Bin Khalifa University comes as a research-oriented, research-intensive university and providing the ability for the students to do their postgraduate into hosting research institute focusing on key challenges of the region, moving into the Science & Technology Park and the innovation and entrepreneurship, which are really a very important elements of taking ideas into action and into really changing the way the economy functions by encouraging more and more startups. So, if you take a look at Education City, you will find that City really encompasses all those, if you would like, factors of really building the future from education to research to entrepreneurship and commercialization. Dr Hasnah, you are an educator, and, as we are having the conversation, we are about six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, which has had a big impact on education - everything from closing schools to didactic plans that have been sidetracked, teachers that have been challenged, families have been challenged when students are at home, et cetera, et cetera. What kind of experience can we draw from these six months, and what kind of real learning scheme we put into thinking about the future of education from these six months? So, I think every challenge comes with an opportunity. And I think the pandemic was really an eye-opener to all the educators to relook and reexamine what they have been doing for years and whether this was really the right model or not. And I think, even though a lot of the universities, including ours, went immediately into a seamless - at least we have been lucky, I think the Foundation and HBKU managed to go in a seamless way into online education. But we have all discovered that online education providing lectures and slides over the Internet, it is not really the end of the story. This is maybe not the best we could do. I think what we are thinking and when we are really relooking at what we have learned from that experience, a lot of ideas comes to really personalized learning, if you would like. How can you build a model where a student getting to a university does not need to really enter at the same entering point, using the same amount of time or working exactly at the same time, which is really during the lecture [hold]? What could you do in providing more options for your students to be able to take classes across institutions? What can be done in really augmenting your education and experience to the students, so they are really not only getting the information, but they are building their soft skills and focusing on their soft skills? I think that the big question that we still need to all work on when we speak about reinventing higher education or rethinking about it, is not to settle by saying, "Online education." I think the pandemic has opened the horizon for everybody to relook at what we are really doing. Do formal degrees of a sense of four years bachelor's degree is the way to go for the future? What does lifelong learning mean for people with a rapid change? How can we facilitate that to people within their workplace? How we can shift careers? What can we do in order for us to provide opportunities for each one of the students to learn at his own pace rather than being part of only the class at large? There is a lot, I think, that needs to be looked at. But one thing that I am sure about is we did not yet reach the end of that question in one end, and the second is that, no matter what we will do, part of that education equation has to always be that interaction between the students among themselves and the faculty and the students. Maybe the format will change, maybe the way it's going to change, maybe whether it is all at the same time might be changing, but I think we are going to envision a different way of conducting business. I think one element that we all really need to think about, when we talk about this, is that accessibility, inclusiveness is a challenge because there are a lot of countries today that do not have Internet access, they do not have the means to be able to do online education. So, when we think about education, we cannot just think it from our own setting. If we are really going to look into models, we need to take care of those countries that are in need of education to change their life, and this is where what I'm saying related to what some universities have started like MicroMasters or many bachelor's degrees are going to be in place because those require less costly, less time of the people to be able to accomplish that, and then maybe the ability of really educating more people without any further physical space. Let's talk a couple of minutes about research and science and innovation. So the Foundation is a key player in Qatar when it comes to funding and creating a context for research and innovation. Can you tell us about what the Foundation has built specifically in this field and what are the main areas of focus? So, research is a very key element of the Foundation. That's why it is called Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development So, science or research come actually in a very important pillar of the Foundation, and from the inception, the research aspect was crucial in the way the Foundation has even attracted educational partners. All of those are research universities, research partners. The Foundation believes that research is creating new ideas, creating new content that are really going to do impact in changing the country's economy and really moving toward the future. To be able to do so, the Foundation understands carefully that you need to build the research culture, you need to have the funding mechanism for which the Foundation has created the Qatar National Research Fund, which is really simulated against National Science Foundation as a funding agency that's really promoting research and also run a strategy, a research on a strategic plan where it identifies what is really the area where the country is in need and where we can make a difference, locally and internationally. And as a result of that study, three major areas have been identified as a way of moving into the future. One which is really in ICT, in computing, in AI, in cybersecurity, in Arabic language processing, in social networks. Second area is related to energy and environment. We all know the challenge that is facing not only the region, but internationally, from climate change, air quality, water, and a lot of people speaking about the future: dispute is going to be around water, energy and how you can really deal with not only conventional energy, but how you can really make a more sustainable energy for the future. And, of course, health, which is really a very important element, of having a healthy population. And, you know, because the region in general has a very high rate, when it comes to diabetes and cancer, so there is a big focus when it comes to research around diabetes and cancer and, if you would like, in neurosciences. All of that, it is not done in a very conventional way, it's done in a very multidisciplinary way, where you have the ICT engaged with biomedical, and so forth. So you are trying to create research teams that are really multidisciplinary, so they can support and enhance each other's work. So the idea is really to have that focus, so you can really contribute into the development of the future of the country. As you can see, those topics are heavily imported locally, relevant locally, but they have a global impact too. Everybody is worried about future energy, everybody is worried about how you deal with cancer and diabetes, and all of that. And, of course, ICT is, needless to say, what's happening on the sphere of social networks and cybersecurity and AI. Dr. Hasnah, you are the President of Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, which is part of Qatar Foundation but is a big institution on its own right. Tell us a little about it. So, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, which is a 10-year institution, came to complete the cycle of education and research within the Foundation. So, as I said, the Education City has students from K to 12 and to undergrad. Hamad Bin Khalifa University came as a research-intensive university, focusing on postgraduate studies to provide that ability to students to follow their ability of conducting master and PhD degrees and believing that your postgraduate is very essential in order for you to achieve the aspiration of the country of a knowledge-based economy. When HBKU was created, it was created on very important principles that wanted to distinguish itself from the rest. One principle is related to the multidisciplinary approach and the providing programs and research aspects. As you know, a lot of the challenges, a lot of the problems that we are facing right now in the university are multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary types of problems. You need to have students while they are really heavily disciplined or very anchored in their disciplines. They need to understand the well-rounded information around that problem, that challenge. So, for example, environment: it is not only engineering elements, it is behavioral elements, it's an economical problem, it's a policy issue. So, we are trying to build our educational program around the multidisciplinary as very important elements. Second, it is around real-life type of research aspects. We want our students to engage while they are in their education with research problems, research challenges, that it is really an actual real-life type of a challenge for them, and not only, if you would like, hypothetical problems. We want them to really be addressing an actual challenge. The third element, which I think is also key, it is related to innovation and entrepreneurship. We want the students to relate to be entrepreneurs. We want the faculty to be entrepreneurs, we want everybody to be really able to take a chance to try. We keep insisting to all our faculty, to all our students that ideas are worth nothing unless they are really taking action or being put into action. So, the university has built its system in supporting students and the faculty and the researcher to give it a try, to take a risk, to fail, and to try again. So, we built the institution and provided the training, and the policy to provide all those opportunities for them to be able to do that. And I think the fourth very important element, in my opinion, is partnership because I think all the challenges that the world is facing right now cannot be addressed and dealt with by one institution. That's why I think we do a lot of partnerships of extended research team and extended educational relationship with the institution to provide our students with the best possible opportunities. Let's talk a moment about language, in particular, the Arabic language. We mentioned in the beginning that the context of our discussion is that Qatar Foundation and TED are starting a partnership to launch a new platform for sharing ideas in Arabic. Now, Arabic is, I think, the sixth most spoken language in the world. How do you see its importance in the world today? So, the Arabic language, we all need to remember that the people who are speaking Arabic today have contributed in the past to the civilization of the universe. They were part of that sequence of civilization. And I think the importance of the language becomes because the language brings history and culture with it. And it provides a set of values that can contribute into a different framework, whether from an ethical perspective, which is really crucial when it comes to stem cells, when it comes to AI, and when it comes to economy, it provides a different framework. So, I think the importance of the language comes not only because of its history, because of the number of speaking that language. I think it comes because of its roots of providing, if you would like, an alternative framework from a set of values, from a set of cultures that is truly addressing the future challenges of the universe, of the globe, using a different framework and a different set of values. And this is where, I think, the language importance comes. And I think this is one dimension of it when you speak about it globally. When you speak about it from a regional perspective, I think it is very important for the population of the region to be connected to their history, connected to their culture, feel that they can really have their own mother tongue use to really express their ideas. As you know, people are really much stronger when they express their ideas in their native language, and they understand much better in their native language. So, in order for you to do that change in that region, you need to be able to provide enough knowledge, enough platform for the people to express and to learn through their language because this the best way they can really achieve their potential. So, to me, it is really the Foundation looking at their investment in the language from those two perspectives, from renaissance and civilization, and the ability of providing that alternative, if you would like, a framework and alternative values, and at the same time being able to provide the needed means for those societies to be able to be linked to their history and the future at the same time. So, when we look around, for example, to digital space, the web, only a small fraction of the existing content is actually currently in Arabic, despite the continuing importance of the language, as we have just described. So, what does having curated content in Arabic through this new initiative TED (Arabic) mean to you? And what do you think it would mean to Arabic speakers and thinkers and scientists everywhere? So, I think I know that the Arabic language on the web has not that much content, but what we are trying to do is also providing more means for people to be able to access other languages through the language processing aspect that I mentioned related to ICT. I think the relationship with TED, it's a very important platform to provide those thinkers, that young generation, those potential entrepreneurs, innovators a platform where they can express their ideas, provide their thinking to their region, to their investors, to their private sector, to their institution, showing that even though they might not really be 100% able to put their ideas in English or French or other languages, we are providing them with the means, telling them that partnership is providing you with that platform. What it takes from you now is to have the courage of showing that you are really capable of providing a very interesting idea, and you are really an entrepreneur, that you are not afraid of sharing your ideas to the public, whether it's locally, regionally, or internationally. So now the plan for TED (Arabic) is to have events, of course, have a website, including a flagship event in Doha at the end of the initiative, and to feature thinkers, researchers, artists, change-makers, entrepreneurs from across the Arab-speaking world. What are you personally most excited about in this partnership? Again, I think the Foundation has started doing a lot of work in trying to promote that entrepreneurship, so the Foundation started "Stars of Science," where it attracts the young generation, entrepreneurs, innovators into trying to really take their ideas into action. And I think that relationship with TED comes as part of that sequence, that work the Foundation is doing from not only trying to increase the publication in Arabic, which we do in HBKU Press, through "Stars of Science" - where we are really promoting that young generation to really bring their ideas and be more innovative - but also coming into a platform where we are taking that young generation, those scientists, those thinkers, those innovators globally and providing them with the right platform to express their ideas and to feel that we are really guiding them in that continuum, from working on the language, because, as you know, language is not only science. When you are not doing well, you are not only lagging in science, you are lagging in science, you are lagging in society, you are lagging in language, are lagging in everything. So, what we are trying to do is we're trying to really promote and get this language, again, back into the level where people start using it, it starts really being active, and this is, again, as I said, similar to what everything the Foundation does. It supports the language development, it supports the publication and writing, whether it's an academic or non-academic book in the language and promotes that, it's also providing the generation of entrepreneurs the ability to really get through programs like "Stars of science," which I have mentioned, and then provide the platform where you complete that equation, if you would like, taking the young generation from the schools who are learning Arabic up to you having an idea, and you can be able to present it to the globe. So, to be honest, I am excited ... the most exciting one is to see those young entrepreneurs on the stage having the courage of saying, "We are really part of that globe we have great ideas, and we are happy to present those." Thank you. That's a beautiful way to end this conversation. I look forward with my colleagues to see this partnership develop, to meeting you and your colleagues in Doha, and, of course, I thank the Qatar Foundation for its support of TED's mission. Dr. Hasnah, thank you very much for taking the time. And to those who have been listening, thank you for listening.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
qatar foundation 7
education city 7
hamad bin 6
bin khalifa 6
khalifa university 5
arabic language 4
online education 3
arab world 2
foundation started 2
educational program 2
important elements 2
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research aspects 2
young generation 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
hamad bin khalifa 6
bin khalifa university 5

ngrams of length 4

collocation frequency
hamad bin khalifa university 5

Important Words

  1. ability
  2. academic
  3. access
  4. accessibility
  5. accomplish
  6. achieve
  7. action
  8. active
  9. actual
  10. addressed
  11. addressing
  12. administrated
  13. afford
  14. afraid
  15. agency
  16. ahmad
  17. ai
  18. aid
  19. aim
  20. air
  21. alternative
  22. ambition
  23. american
  24. amount
  25. anchored
  26. approach
  27. arab
  28. arabic
  29. area
  30. areas
  31. artists
  32. aspect
  33. aspects
  34. aspiration
  35. attract
  36. attracted
  37. attracting
  38. attracts
  39. augmenting
  40. aware
  41. based
  42. beautiful
  43. beginning
  44. behavioral
  45. believes
  46. believing
  47. big
  48. bin
  49. biomedical
  50. bit
  51. book
  52. briefly
  53. bring
  54. brings
  55. brought
  56. bruno
  57. build
  58. building
  59. built
  60. business
  61. called
  62. cancer
  63. capable
  64. capital
  65. care
  66. careers
  67. carefully
  68. cells
  69. centers
  70. cetera
  71. challenge
  72. challenged
  73. challenges
  74. chance
  75. change
  76. changing
  77. city
  78. civilization
  79. class
  80. classes
  81. climate
  82. closing
  83. colleagues
  84. college
  85. colleges
  86. coming
  87. commercialization
  88. community
  89. complete
  90. computing
  91. conducting
  92. connected
  93. content
  94. context
  95. continuing
  96. continuum
  97. contribute
  98. contributed
  99. conventional
  100. conversation
  101. cornerstone
  102. costly
  103. countries
  104. country
  105. couple
  106. courage
  107. create
  108. created
  109. creating
  110. critical
  111. crucial
  112. culture
  113. cultures
  114. curated
  115. cybersecurity
  116. cycle
  117. deal
  118. dealt
  119. degree
  120. degrees
  121. department
  122. departments
  123. develop
  124. developed
  125. development
  126. diabetes
  127. didactic
  128. difference
  129. digital
  130. dimension
  131. disciplined
  132. disciplines
  133. discovered
  134. discuss
  135. discussion
  136. dispute
  137. distinguish
  138. doha
  139. dr
  140. draw
  141. economic
  142. economical
  143. economy
  144. ecosystem
  145. educating
  146. education
  147. educational
  148. educator
  149. educators
  150. element
  151. elements
  152. encompasses
  153. encouraging
  154. energy
  155. engage
  156. engaged
  157. engineering
  158. english
  159. enhance
  160. enter
  161. entering
  162. entire
  163. entrepreneur
  164. entrepreneurs
  165. entrepreneurship
  166. environment
  167. envision
  168. equation
  169. essential
  170. ethical
  171. europe
  172. event
  173. events
  174. excited
  175. exciting
  176. existing
  177. experience
  178. explain
  179. express
  180. extended
  181. facilitate
  182. facing
  183. factors
  184. faculties
  185. faculty
  186. fail
  187. families
  188. feature
  189. feel
  190. field
  191. financial
  192. find
  193. fine
  194. flagship
  195. focus
  196. focused
  197. focusing
  198. follow
  199. formal
  200. format
  201. foundation
  202. fourth
  203. fraction
  204. framework
  205. french
  206. function
  207. functions
  208. fund
  209. funding
  210. future
  211. general
  212. generation
  213. generous
  214. give
  215. global
  216. globally
  217. globe
  218. graduating
  219. great
  220. guiding
  221. hamad
  222. happening
  223. happy
  224. hasnah
  225. hbku
  226. health
  227. healthy
  228. heavily
  229. high
  230. higher
  231. highly
  232. history
  233. hold
  234. home
  235. honest
  236. horizon
  237. hosting
  238. human
  239. hypothetical
  240. ict
  241. idea
  242. ideas
  243. identified
  244. identifies
  245. immediately
  246. impact
  247. importance
  248. important
  249. imported
  250. impressed
  251. inception
  252. including
  253. inclusive
  254. inclusiveness
  255. increase
  256. information
  257. initiative
  258. innovation
  259. innovative
  260. innovators
  261. insisting
  262. institute
  263. institution
  264. institutions
  265. interaction
  266. interdisciplinary
  267. interesting
  268. internationally
  269. internet
  270. introducing
  271. invested
  272. investing
  273. investment
  274. investors
  275. issue
  276. join
  277. joined
  278. keen
  279. key
  280. khalifa
  281. kind
  282. knowledge
  283. lagging
  284. language
  285. languages
  286. large
  287. launch
  288. launching
  289. learn
  290. learned
  291. learning
  292. lecture
  293. lectures
  294. level
  295. life
  296. lifelong
  297. linked
  298. listening
  299. locally
  300. looked
  301. lot
  302. lucky
  303. main
  304. maintaining
  305. major
  306. managed
  307. master
  308. matter
  309. means
  310. mechanism
  311. meeting
  312. member
  313. mentioned
  314. micromasters
  315. mindset
  316. minutes
  317. mission
  318. model
  319. models
  320. moment
  321. months
  322. mother
  323. moving
  324. multidisciplinary
  325. multiyear
  326. national
  327. native
  328. needed
  329. needless
  330. networks
  331. neurosciences
  332. number
  333. online
  334. opened
  335. opening
  336. opinion
  337. opportunities
  338. opportunity
  339. options
  340. order
  341. pace
  342. pandemic
  343. parents
  344. park
  345. part
  346. partner
  347. partners
  348. partnership
  349. partnerships
  350. people
  351. personalized
  352. personally
  353. perspective
  354. perspectives
  355. phd
  356. physical
  357. pillar
  358. place
  359. plan
  360. plans
  361. platform
  362. player
  363. pleasure
  364. point
  365. policy
  366. population
  367. postgraduate
  368. potential
  369. present
  370. president
  371. press
  372. principle
  373. principles
  374. private
  375. problem
  376. problems
  377. processing
  378. program
  379. programs
  380. project
  381. promote
  382. promotes
  383. promoting
  384. provide
  385. provider
  386. providing
  387. public
  388. publication
  389. purpose
  390. put
  391. qatar
  392. quality
  393. question
  394. rankings
  395. rapid
  396. rate
  397. reach
  398. real
  399. reenergize
  400. reexamine
  401. region
  402. regional
  403. regionally
  404. reinventing
  405. relate
  406. related
  407. relationship
  408. relevant
  409. relook
  410. relooking
  411. remember
  412. renaissance
  413. require
  414. research
  415. researcher
  416. researchers
  417. responsibility
  418. rest
  419. result
  420. rethinking
  421. risk
  422. road
  423. role
  424. roots
  425. run
  426. running
  427. scheme
  428. scholarship
  429. schools
  430. science
  431. scientists
  432. seamless
  433. sector
  434. sectors
  435. selective
  436. sense
  437. sequence
  438. set
  439. setting
  440. settle
  441. share
  442. sharing
  443. shift
  444. shortly
  445. showing
  446. sidetracked
  447. similar
  448. simulated
  449. single
  450. sites
  451. sixth
  452. skills
  453. slides
  454. small
  455. social
  456. societies
  457. society
  458. soft
  459. sort
  460. space
  461. speak
  462. speakers
  463. speaking
  464. specific
  465. specifically
  466. sphere
  467. spoken
  468. stage
  469. start
  470. started
  471. starting
  472. starts
  473. startups
  474. status
  475. stem
  476. story
  477. strategic
  478. strategy
  479. stronger
  480. student
  481. students
  482. studies
  483. study
  484. subtitled
  485. support
  486. supporting
  487. supports
  488. sustainable
  489. system
  490. takes
  491. talk
  492. talks
  493. target
  494. teachers
  495. team
  496. teams
  497. technology
  498. ted
  499. tedinarabic
  500. tedx
  501. telling
  502. thinkers
  503. thinking
  504. time
  505. today
  506. tongue
  507. top
  508. topics
  509. training
  510. translated
  511. translates
  512. type
  513. types
  514. undergrad
  515. understand
  516. understands
  517. universe
  518. universities
  519. university
  520. values
  521. visiting
  522. wanted
  523. water
  524. web
  525. website
  526. words
  527. work
  528. working
  529. workplace
  530. world
  531. worried
  532. worth
  533. writing
  534. years
  535. young