full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Emma Bryce: Should we eat bugs?

Unscramble the Blue Letters

[Why don't we eat bugs?] For centuries, people have consumed bugs, everything from beetles to caterpillars, locusts, grasshoppers, termites, and dailferongs. The practice even has a name: entomophagy. Early hunter-gatherers probably learned from almains that fgaoerd for protein-rich insects and followed suit. As we evolved and bugs became part of our dietary toiatirdn, they fulfilled the role of both staple food and delicacy. In ancient Greece, cicadas were cesroinded luxury snacks. And even the rmnoas found betele lavrae to be scrumptious. Why have we lost our taste for bugs? The reason for our rejection is historical, and the story probably begins around 10,000 BC in the Fertile Crescent, a place in the Middle East that was a major btiahpcrle of aglcuutrrie. Back then, our once-nomadic ancestors bgaen to settle in the Crescent. And as they lrnaeed to farm crops and domesticate animals there, atueittds changed, riplpnig outwards towards Europe and the rest of the Western world. As farming took off, people might have spurned bugs as mere pests that deyestrod their crops. Populations grew, and the West became urbanized, weakening connections with our foraging past. People simply forgot their bug-rich history. Today, for people not asctueocmd to entomophagy, bugs are just an irritant. They sting and bite and inefst our food. We feel an "ick factor" associated with them and are disgusted by the prospect of cooking insects. Almost 2,000 insect sepices are turned into food, forming a big part of everyday diets for two billion people around the wolrd. Countries in the tropics are the keenest consumers, because culturally, it's acceptable. Species in those regions are also large, diverse, and tend to congregate in groups or swarms that make them easy to harvest. Take Cambodia in ssuhtoaet Asia where huge tarantulas are gathered, fried, and sold in the marketplace. In srtoehun Africa, the juicy mopane worm is a dtairey staple, simmered in a scpiy sauce or eaten deird and salted. And in Mexico, chopped jumiles are toasted with garlic, loemn, and salt. Bugs can be eaten whole to make up a meal or ground into flour, pewdor, and paste to add to food. But it's not all about taste. They're also healthy. In fact, scientists say entomophagy could be a cost-effective stooulin for developing countries that are food insecure. ietcsns can contain up to 80% protein, the body's vital building bcloks, and are also high in energy-rich fat, fbier, and micronutrients like vitamins and mlineras. Did you know that most edible insects contain the same aounmt or even more mineral iron than beef, making them a huge, untapped resource when you consider that iron deficiency is currently the most common nutritional problem in the world? The mrelwaom is another nutritious example. The yellow beetle larvae are native to America and easy to farm. They have a high vitamin content, loads of healthy minerals, and can contain up to 50% pietorn, almost as much as in an equivalent amount of beef. To cook, simply sauté in butter and salt or rsaot and drizzle with chocolate for a crunchy snack. What you have to overcome in "ick factor," you gain in nutrition and taste. Indeed, bugs can be delicious. Mealworms taste like roasted nuts. lutoscs are similar to shrimp. Crickets, some popele say, have an aroma of popcorn. Farming insects for food also has less environmental iapcmt than livestock farms do because insects emit far less greenhouse gas and use up less sapce, water, and food. Socioeconomically, bug pctrodouin could uplift people in developing countries since icnset famrs can be small scale, highly productive, and yet relatively inexpensive to keep. Insects can also be truned into more snuasblitae food for livestock and can be rreead on organic waste, like vegetable peelings, that might otherwise just end up rotting in landfills. Feeling hungry yet? Faced with a plate of fried cctreiks, most people today would still recoil, imagining all those legs and feelers getting stuck between their teeth. But think of a lobster. It's pretty much just a giant insect with legs and feelers grlaoe that was once regarded as an inferior, repulsive food. Now, lobster is a delicacy. Can the same paradigm shift happen for bugs? So, give it a try! Pop that insect into your mouth, and savor the crunch.

Open Cloze

[Why don't we eat bugs?] For centuries, people have consumed bugs, everything from beetles to caterpillars, locusts, grasshoppers, termites, and ___________. The practice even has a name: entomophagy. Early hunter-gatherers probably learned from _______ that _______ for protein-rich insects and followed suit. As we evolved and bugs became part of our dietary _________, they fulfilled the role of both staple food and delicacy. In ancient Greece, cicadas were __________ luxury snacks. And even the ______ found ______ ______ to be scrumptious. Why have we lost our taste for bugs? The reason for our rejection is historical, and the story probably begins around 10,000 BC in the Fertile Crescent, a place in the Middle East that was a major __________ of ___________. Back then, our once-nomadic ancestors _____ to settle in the Crescent. And as they _______ to farm crops and domesticate animals there, _________ changed, ________ outwards towards Europe and the rest of the Western world. As farming took off, people might have spurned bugs as mere pests that _________ their crops. Populations grew, and the West became urbanized, weakening connections with our foraging past. People simply forgot their bug-rich history. Today, for people not __________ to entomophagy, bugs are just an irritant. They sting and bite and ______ our food. We feel an "ick factor" associated with them and are disgusted by the prospect of cooking insects. Almost 2,000 insect _______ are turned into food, forming a big part of everyday diets for two billion people around the _____. Countries in the tropics are the keenest consumers, because culturally, it's acceptable. Species in those regions are also large, diverse, and tend to congregate in groups or swarms that make them easy to harvest. Take Cambodia in _________ Asia where huge tarantulas are gathered, fried, and sold in the marketplace. In ________ Africa, the juicy mopane worm is a _______ staple, simmered in a _____ sauce or eaten _____ and salted. And in Mexico, chopped jumiles are toasted with garlic, _____, and salt. Bugs can be eaten whole to make up a meal or ground into flour, ______, and paste to add to food. But it's not all about taste. They're also healthy. In fact, scientists say entomophagy could be a cost-effective ________ for developing countries that are food insecure. _______ can contain up to 80% protein, the body's vital building ______, and are also high in energy-rich fat, _____, and micronutrients like vitamins and ________. Did you know that most edible insects contain the same ______ or even more mineral iron than beef, making them a huge, untapped resource when you consider that iron deficiency is currently the most common nutritional problem in the world? The ________ is another nutritious example. The yellow beetle larvae are native to America and easy to farm. They have a high vitamin content, loads of healthy minerals, and can contain up to 50% _______, almost as much as in an equivalent amount of beef. To cook, simply sauté in butter and salt or _____ and drizzle with chocolate for a crunchy snack. What you have to overcome in "ick factor," you gain in nutrition and taste. Indeed, bugs can be delicious. Mealworms taste like roasted nuts. _______ are similar to shrimp. Crickets, some ______ say, have an aroma of popcorn. Farming insects for food also has less environmental ______ than livestock farms do because insects emit far less greenhouse gas and use up less _____, water, and food. Socioeconomically, bug __________ could uplift people in developing countries since ______ _____ can be small scale, highly productive, and yet relatively inexpensive to keep. Insects can also be ______ into more ___________ food for livestock and can be ______ on organic waste, like vegetable peelings, that might otherwise just end up rotting in landfills. Feeling hungry yet? Faced with a plate of fried ________, most people today would still recoil, imagining all those legs and feelers getting stuck between their teeth. But think of a lobster. It's pretty much just a giant insect with legs and feelers ______ that was once regarded as an inferior, repulsive food. Now, lobster is a delicacy. Can the same paradigm shift happen for bugs? So, give it a try! Pop that insect into your mouth, and savor the crunch.

Solution

  1. space
  2. farms
  3. accustomed
  4. insect
  5. impact
  6. agriculture
  7. mealworm
  8. world
  9. romans
  10. species
  11. amount
  12. dragonflies
  13. considered
  14. roast
  15. began
  16. spicy
  17. crickets
  18. rippling
  19. protein
  20. locusts
  21. learned
  22. dried
  23. southern
  24. animals
  25. destroyed
  26. powder
  27. insects
  28. southeast
  29. production
  30. minerals
  31. beetle
  32. turned
  33. tradition
  34. attitudes
  35. solution
  36. dietary
  37. galore
  38. reared
  39. fiber
  40. lemon
  41. larvae
  42. infest
  43. blocks
  44. people
  45. foraged
  46. birthplace
  47. sustainable

Original Text

[Why don't we eat bugs?] For centuries, people have consumed bugs, everything from beetles to caterpillars, locusts, grasshoppers, termites, and dragonflies. The practice even has a name: entomophagy. Early hunter-gatherers probably learned from animals that foraged for protein-rich insects and followed suit. As we evolved and bugs became part of our dietary tradition, they fulfilled the role of both staple food and delicacy. In ancient Greece, cicadas were considered luxury snacks. And even the Romans found beetle larvae to be scrumptious. Why have we lost our taste for bugs? The reason for our rejection is historical, and the story probably begins around 10,000 BC in the Fertile Crescent, a place in the Middle East that was a major birthplace of agriculture. Back then, our once-nomadic ancestors began to settle in the Crescent. And as they learned to farm crops and domesticate animals there, attitudes changed, rippling outwards towards Europe and the rest of the Western world. As farming took off, people might have spurned bugs as mere pests that destroyed their crops. Populations grew, and the West became urbanized, weakening connections with our foraging past. People simply forgot their bug-rich history. Today, for people not accustomed to entomophagy, bugs are just an irritant. They sting and bite and infest our food. We feel an "ick factor" associated with them and are disgusted by the prospect of cooking insects. Almost 2,000 insect species are turned into food, forming a big part of everyday diets for two billion people around the world. Countries in the tropics are the keenest consumers, because culturally, it's acceptable. Species in those regions are also large, diverse, and tend to congregate in groups or swarms that make them easy to harvest. Take Cambodia in Southeast Asia where huge tarantulas are gathered, fried, and sold in the marketplace. In southern Africa, the juicy mopane worm is a dietary staple, simmered in a spicy sauce or eaten dried and salted. And in Mexico, chopped jumiles are toasted with garlic, lemon, and salt. Bugs can be eaten whole to make up a meal or ground into flour, powder, and paste to add to food. But it's not all about taste. They're also healthy. In fact, scientists say entomophagy could be a cost-effective solution for developing countries that are food insecure. Insects can contain up to 80% protein, the body's vital building blocks, and are also high in energy-rich fat, fiber, and micronutrients like vitamins and minerals. Did you know that most edible insects contain the same amount or even more mineral iron than beef, making them a huge, untapped resource when you consider that iron deficiency is currently the most common nutritional problem in the world? The mealworm is another nutritious example. The yellow beetle larvae are native to America and easy to farm. They have a high vitamin content, loads of healthy minerals, and can contain up to 50% protein, almost as much as in an equivalent amount of beef. To cook, simply sauté in butter and salt or roast and drizzle with chocolate for a crunchy snack. What you have to overcome in "ick factor," you gain in nutrition and taste. Indeed, bugs can be delicious. Mealworms taste like roasted nuts. Locusts are similar to shrimp. Crickets, some people say, have an aroma of popcorn. Farming insects for food also has less environmental impact than livestock farms do because insects emit far less greenhouse gas and use up less space, water, and food. Socioeconomically, bug production could uplift people in developing countries since insect farms can be small scale, highly productive, and yet relatively inexpensive to keep. Insects can also be turned into more sustainable food for livestock and can be reared on organic waste, like vegetable peelings, that might otherwise just end up rotting in landfills. Feeling hungry yet? Faced with a plate of fried crickets, most people today would still recoil, imagining all those legs and feelers getting stuck between their teeth. But think of a lobster. It's pretty much just a giant insect with legs and feelers galore that was once regarded as an inferior, repulsive food. Now, lobster is a delicacy. Can the same paradigm shift happen for bugs? So, give it a try! Pop that insect into your mouth, and savor the crunch.

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
beetle larvae 2
developing countries 2

Important Words

  1. acceptable
  2. accustomed
  3. add
  4. africa
  5. agriculture
  6. america
  7. amount
  8. ancestors
  9. ancient
  10. animals
  11. aroma
  12. asia
  13. attitudes
  14. bc
  15. beef
  16. beetle
  17. beetles
  18. began
  19. begins
  20. big
  21. billion
  22. birthplace
  23. bite
  24. blocks
  25. bug
  26. bugs
  27. building
  28. butter
  29. cambodia
  30. caterpillars
  31. centuries
  32. changed
  33. chocolate
  34. chopped
  35. cicadas
  36. common
  37. congregate
  38. connections
  39. considered
  40. consumed
  41. consumers
  42. content
  43. cook
  44. cooking
  45. countries
  46. crescent
  47. crickets
  48. crops
  49. crunch
  50. crunchy
  51. culturally
  52. deficiency
  53. delicacy
  54. delicious
  55. destroyed
  56. developing
  57. dietary
  58. diets
  59. disgusted
  60. diverse
  61. domesticate
  62. dragonflies
  63. dried
  64. drizzle
  65. early
  66. east
  67. easy
  68. eat
  69. eaten
  70. edible
  71. emit
  72. entomophagy
  73. environmental
  74. equivalent
  75. europe
  76. everyday
  77. evolved
  78. faced
  79. fact
  80. factor
  81. farm
  82. farming
  83. farms
  84. fat
  85. feel
  86. feelers
  87. feeling
  88. fertile
  89. fiber
  90. flour
  91. food
  92. foraged
  93. foraging
  94. forgot
  95. forming
  96. fried
  97. fulfilled
  98. gain
  99. galore
  100. garlic
  101. gas
  102. gathered
  103. giant
  104. give
  105. grasshoppers
  106. greece
  107. greenhouse
  108. grew
  109. ground
  110. groups
  111. happen
  112. harvest
  113. healthy
  114. high
  115. highly
  116. historical
  117. history
  118. huge
  119. hungry
  120. imagining
  121. impact
  122. inexpensive
  123. inferior
  124. infest
  125. insect
  126. insects
  127. insecure
  128. iron
  129. irritant
  130. juicy
  131. jumiles
  132. keenest
  133. landfills
  134. large
  135. larvae
  136. learned
  137. legs
  138. lemon
  139. livestock
  140. loads
  141. lobster
  142. locusts
  143. lost
  144. luxury
  145. major
  146. making
  147. marketplace
  148. meal
  149. mealworm
  150. mealworms
  151. mere
  152. mexico
  153. micronutrients
  154. middle
  155. mineral
  156. minerals
  157. mopane
  158. mouth
  159. native
  160. nutrition
  161. nutritional
  162. nutritious
  163. nuts
  164. organic
  165. outwards
  166. overcome
  167. paradigm
  168. part
  169. paste
  170. peelings
  171. people
  172. pests
  173. place
  174. plate
  175. pop
  176. popcorn
  177. populations
  178. powder
  179. practice
  180. pretty
  181. problem
  182. production
  183. productive
  184. prospect
  185. protein
  186. reared
  187. reason
  188. recoil
  189. regarded
  190. regions
  191. rejection
  192. repulsive
  193. resource
  194. rest
  195. rippling
  196. roast
  197. roasted
  198. role
  199. romans
  200. rotting
  201. salt
  202. salted
  203. sauce
  204. sauté
  205. savor
  206. scale
  207. scientists
  208. scrumptious
  209. settle
  210. shift
  211. shrimp
  212. similar
  213. simmered
  214. simply
  215. small
  216. snack
  217. snacks
  218. socioeconomically
  219. sold
  220. solution
  221. southeast
  222. southern
  223. space
  224. species
  225. spicy
  226. spurned
  227. staple
  228. sting
  229. story
  230. stuck
  231. suit
  232. sustainable
  233. swarms
  234. tarantulas
  235. taste
  236. teeth
  237. tend
  238. termites
  239. toasted
  240. today
  241. tradition
  242. tropics
  243. turned
  244. untapped
  245. uplift
  246. urbanized
  247. vegetable
  248. vital
  249. vitamin
  250. vitamins
  251. waste
  252. water
  253. weakening
  254. west
  255. western
  256. world
  257. worm
  258. yellow