full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Nancy Lublin: Texting that saves lives

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Texting: I know I say texting and a lot of you think sexting, a lot of you think about the lewd photos that you see — hopefully not your kids sending to somebody else — or trying to translate the abbreviations LOL, LMAO, HMU. I can help you with those later. But the parents in the room know that texting is actually the best way to ciunammtcoe with your kids. It might be the only way to communicate with your kids. (Laughter) The average teenager sndes 3,339 text messages a month, unless she's a girl, then it's csoler to 4,000. And the secret is she onpes every sgnile one. Texting has a 100 percent open rate. Now the parents are really armlaed. It's a 100 pnerect open rate even if she doesn't respond to you when you ask her when she's ciomng home for dinner. I promise she read that text. And this isn't some suburban iPhone-using teen phenomenon. Texting actually overindexes for minority and urban youth. I know this because at DoSomething.org, which is the lgreast organization for teenagers and social change in America, about six mnhots ago we pivoted and started focusing on text messaging. We're now teintxg out to about 200,000 kids a week about doing our campaigns to make their schools more green or to work on homeless issues and things like that. We're finding it 11 times more powerful than email. We've also found an uidenntned consequence. We've been getting text messages back like these. "I don't want to go to school today. The boys call me foggat." "I was cutting, my parents found out, and so I stopped. But I just srettad again an hour ago." Or, "He won't stop raping me. He told me not to tell anyone. It's my dad. Are you there?" That last one's an actual text masegse that we received. And yeah, we're there. I will not fgoret the day we got that text message. And so it was that day that we decided we needed to bliud a crisis text hotline. Because this isn't what we do. We do social change. Kids are just sending us these text messages because texting is so fimlaair and comfortable to them and there's nowhere else to turn that they're sending them to us. So think about it, a text hotline; it's pretty powerful. It's fast, it's pretty private. No one hears you in a stall, you're just texting quietly. It's real time. We can help millions of teens with counseling and referrals. That's gaert. But the thing that really makes this amowsee is the data. Because I'm not really cmrfobotale just helping that girl with counseling and referrals. I want to prevent this shit from happening. So think about a cop. There's something in New York City. The plcioe did it. It used to be just guess work, police work. And then they started crime mpnaipg. And so they started following and watching petty thefts, sunmsmoes, all kinds of things — charting the future essentially. And they found things like, when you see crystal meth on the seetrt, if you add police presence, you can curb the otherwise iabenvlite spate of atlsusas and reieorbbs that would happen. In fact, the year after the NYPD put CompStat in place, the murder rate fell 60 percent. So think about the data from a crisis text line. There is no census on bllniuyg and dating abuse and eating disorders and cutting and rape — no cnuess. Maybe there's some studies, some lngiaitodunl studies, that cost lots of money and took lots of time. Or maybe there's some anecdotal evidence. Imagine having real time data on every one of those issues. You could inform lsieiaotgln. You could inform school policy. You could say to a principal, "You're having a problem every Thursday at three o'clock. What's going on in your school?" You could see the immediate impact of legislation or a hateful seepch that somebody gives in a school assembly and see what happens as a relust. This is really, to me, the power of texting and the power of data. Because while people are tlanikg about data, manikg it possible for Facebook to mine my frnied from the third grade, or taergt to know when it's time for me to buy more diapers, or some dude to build a better baseball team, I'm actually really excited about the pweor of data and the power of texting to help that kid go to school, to help that girl stop cutting in the brhtooam and absolutely to help that girl whose father's raping her. Thank you. (Applause)

Open Cloze

Texting: I know I say texting and a lot of you think sexting, a lot of you think about the lewd photos that you see — hopefully not your kids sending to somebody else — or trying to translate the abbreviations LOL, LMAO, HMU. I can help you with those later. But the parents in the room know that texting is actually the best way to ___________ with your kids. It might be the only way to communicate with your kids. (Laughter) The average teenager _____ 3,339 text messages a month, unless she's a girl, then it's ______ to 4,000. And the secret is she _____ every ______ one. Texting has a 100 percent open rate. Now the parents are really _______. It's a 100 _______ open rate even if she doesn't respond to you when you ask her when she's ______ home for dinner. I promise she read that text. And this isn't some suburban iPhone-using teen phenomenon. Texting actually overindexes for minority and urban youth. I know this because at DoSomething.org, which is the _______ organization for teenagers and social change in America, about six ______ ago we pivoted and started focusing on text messaging. We're now _______ out to about 200,000 kids a week about doing our campaigns to make their schools more green or to work on homeless issues and things like that. We're finding it 11 times more powerful than email. We've also found an __________ consequence. We've been getting text messages back like these. "I don't want to go to school today. The boys call me ______." "I was cutting, my parents found out, and so I stopped. But I just _______ again an hour ago." Or, "He won't stop raping me. He told me not to tell anyone. It's my dad. Are you there?" That last one's an actual text _______ that we received. And yeah, we're there. I will not ______ the day we got that text message. And so it was that day that we decided we needed to _____ a crisis text hotline. Because this isn't what we do. We do social change. Kids are just sending us these text messages because texting is so ________ and comfortable to them and there's nowhere else to turn that they're sending them to us. So think about it, a text hotline; it's pretty powerful. It's fast, it's pretty private. No one hears you in a stall, you're just texting quietly. It's real time. We can help millions of teens with counseling and referrals. That's _____. But the thing that really makes this _______ is the data. Because I'm not really ___________ just helping that girl with counseling and referrals. I want to prevent this shit from happening. So think about a cop. There's something in New York City. The ______ did it. It used to be just guess work, police work. And then they started crime _______. And so they started following and watching petty thefts, _________, all kinds of things — charting the future essentially. And they found things like, when you see crystal meth on the ______, if you add police presence, you can curb the otherwise __________ spate of ________ and _________ that would happen. In fact, the year after the NYPD put CompStat in place, the murder rate fell 60 percent. So think about the data from a crisis text line. There is no census on ________ and dating abuse and eating disorders and cutting and rape — no ______. Maybe there's some studies, some ____________ studies, that cost lots of money and took lots of time. Or maybe there's some anecdotal evidence. Imagine having real time data on every one of those issues. You could inform ___________. You could inform school policy. You could say to a principal, "You're having a problem every Thursday at three o'clock. What's going on in your school?" You could see the immediate impact of legislation or a hateful ______ that somebody gives in a school assembly and see what happens as a ______. This is really, to me, the power of texting and the power of data. Because while people are _______ about data, ______ it possible for Facebook to mine my ______ from the third grade, or ______ to know when it's time for me to buy more diapers, or some dude to build a better baseball team, I'm actually really excited about the _____ of data and the power of texting to help that kid go to school, to help that girl stop cutting in the ________ and absolutely to help that girl whose father's raping her. Thank you. (Applause)

Solution

  1. largest
  2. alarmed
  3. comfortable
  4. target
  5. months
  6. talking
  7. speech
  8. longitudinal
  9. single
  10. power
  11. census
  12. awesome
  13. percent
  14. forget
  15. familiar
  16. bullying
  17. started
  18. making
  19. mapping
  20. closer
  21. sends
  22. opens
  23. faggot
  24. robberies
  25. legislation
  26. friend
  27. coming
  28. inevitable
  29. great
  30. bathroom
  31. communicate
  32. street
  33. texting
  34. police
  35. build
  36. summonses
  37. unintended
  38. assaults
  39. result
  40. message

Original Text

Texting: I know I say texting and a lot of you think sexting, a lot of you think about the lewd photos that you see — hopefully not your kids sending to somebody else — or trying to translate the abbreviations LOL, LMAO, HMU. I can help you with those later. But the parents in the room know that texting is actually the best way to communicate with your kids. It might be the only way to communicate with your kids. (Laughter) The average teenager sends 3,339 text messages a month, unless she's a girl, then it's closer to 4,000. And the secret is she opens every single one. Texting has a 100 percent open rate. Now the parents are really alarmed. It's a 100 percent open rate even if she doesn't respond to you when you ask her when she's coming home for dinner. I promise she read that text. And this isn't some suburban iPhone-using teen phenomenon. Texting actually overindexes for minority and urban youth. I know this because at DoSomething.org, which is the largest organization for teenagers and social change in America, about six months ago we pivoted and started focusing on text messaging. We're now texting out to about 200,000 kids a week about doing our campaigns to make their schools more green or to work on homeless issues and things like that. We're finding it 11 times more powerful than email. We've also found an unintended consequence. We've been getting text messages back like these. "I don't want to go to school today. The boys call me faggot." "I was cutting, my parents found out, and so I stopped. But I just started again an hour ago." Or, "He won't stop raping me. He told me not to tell anyone. It's my dad. Are you there?" That last one's an actual text message that we received. And yeah, we're there. I will not forget the day we got that text message. And so it was that day that we decided we needed to build a crisis text hotline. Because this isn't what we do. We do social change. Kids are just sending us these text messages because texting is so familiar and comfortable to them and there's nowhere else to turn that they're sending them to us. So think about it, a text hotline; it's pretty powerful. It's fast, it's pretty private. No one hears you in a stall, you're just texting quietly. It's real time. We can help millions of teens with counseling and referrals. That's great. But the thing that really makes this awesome is the data. Because I'm not really comfortable just helping that girl with counseling and referrals. I want to prevent this shit from happening. So think about a cop. There's something in New York City. The police did it. It used to be just guess work, police work. And then they started crime mapping. And so they started following and watching petty thefts, summonses, all kinds of things — charting the future essentially. And they found things like, when you see crystal meth on the street, if you add police presence, you can curb the otherwise inevitable spate of assaults and robberies that would happen. In fact, the year after the NYPD put CompStat in place, the murder rate fell 60 percent. So think about the data from a crisis text line. There is no census on bullying and dating abuse and eating disorders and cutting and rape — no census. Maybe there's some studies, some longitudinal studies, that cost lots of money and took lots of time. Or maybe there's some anecdotal evidence. Imagine having real time data on every one of those issues. You could inform legislation. You could inform school policy. You could say to a principal, "You're having a problem every Thursday at three o'clock. What's going on in your school?" You could see the immediate impact of legislation or a hateful speech that somebody gives in a school assembly and see what happens as a result. This is really, to me, the power of texting and the power of data. Because while people are talking about data, making it possible for Facebook to mine my friend from the third grade, or Target to know when it's time for me to buy more diapers, or some dude to build a better baseball team, I'm actually really excited about the power of data and the power of texting to help that kid go to school, to help that girl stop cutting in the bathroom and absolutely to help that girl whose father's raping her. Thank you. (Applause)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
text messages 3
percent open 2
open rate 2
social change 2
text message 2
crisis text 2
real time 2

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
percent open rate 2

Important Words

  1. abbreviations
  2. absolutely
  3. abuse
  4. actual
  5. add
  6. alarmed
  7. america
  8. anecdotal
  9. applause
  10. assaults
  11. assembly
  12. average
  13. awesome
  14. baseball
  15. bathroom
  16. boys
  17. build
  18. bullying
  19. buy
  20. call
  21. campaigns
  22. census
  23. change
  24. charting
  25. city
  26. closer
  27. comfortable
  28. coming
  29. communicate
  30. compstat
  31. consequence
  32. cop
  33. cost
  34. counseling
  35. crime
  36. crisis
  37. crystal
  38. curb
  39. cutting
  40. dad
  41. data
  42. dating
  43. day
  44. decided
  45. diapers
  46. dinner
  47. disorders
  48. dosomething
  49. dude
  50. eating
  51. email
  52. essentially
  53. evidence
  54. excited
  55. facebook
  56. fact
  57. faggot
  58. familiar
  59. fast
  60. fell
  61. finding
  62. focusing
  63. forget
  64. friend
  65. future
  66. girl
  67. grade
  68. great
  69. green
  70. guess
  71. happen
  72. happening
  73. hateful
  74. hears
  75. helping
  76. hmu
  77. home
  78. homeless
  79. hotline
  80. hour
  81. imagine
  82. impact
  83. inevitable
  84. inform
  85. issues
  86. kid
  87. kids
  88. kinds
  89. largest
  90. laughter
  91. legislation
  92. lewd
  93. line
  94. lmao
  95. lol
  96. longitudinal
  97. lot
  98. lots
  99. making
  100. mapping
  101. message
  102. messages
  103. messaging
  104. meth
  105. millions
  106. minority
  107. money
  108. month
  109. months
  110. murder
  111. needed
  112. nypd
  113. open
  114. opens
  115. org
  116. organization
  117. overindexes
  118. parents
  119. people
  120. percent
  121. petty
  122. phenomenon
  123. photos
  124. pivoted
  125. place
  126. police
  127. policy
  128. power
  129. powerful
  130. presence
  131. pretty
  132. prevent
  133. principal
  134. private
  135. problem
  136. promise
  137. put
  138. quietly
  139. rape
  140. raping
  141. rate
  142. read
  143. real
  144. received
  145. referrals
  146. respond
  147. result
  148. robberies
  149. room
  150. school
  151. schools
  152. secret
  153. sending
  154. sends
  155. sexting
  156. shit
  157. single
  158. social
  159. spate
  160. speech
  161. stall
  162. started
  163. stop
  164. stopped
  165. street
  166. studies
  167. suburban
  168. summonses
  169. talking
  170. target
  171. team
  172. teen
  173. teenager
  174. teenagers
  175. teens
  176. text
  177. texting
  178. thefts
  179. thursday
  180. time
  181. times
  182. today
  183. told
  184. translate
  185. turn
  186. unintended
  187. urban
  188. watching
  189. week
  190. work
  191. yeah
  192. year
  193. york
  194. youth