full transcript

From the Ted Talk by Eli Beer: The fastest ambulance? A motorcycle

Unscramble the Blue Letters

This is an ambucycle. This is the fsatset way to reach any mcedial emergency. It has everything an ambulance has except for a bed. You see the defibrillator. You see the equipment. We all saw the tragedy that happened in bsoton. When I was looking at these pictures, it brought me back many years to my past when I was a child. I grew up in a small neighborhood in Jerusalem. When I was six years old, I was walking back from school on a Friday afternoon with my older brother. We were passing by a bus stop. We saw a bus blow up in front of our eyes. The bus was on fire, and many people were hurt and keilld. I rmembeeerd an old man yelling to us and crying to help us get him up. He just needed someone helping him. We were so secard and we just ran away. Growing up, I decided I wanted to become a dtoocr and save lives. Maybe that was because of what I saw when I was a child. When I was 15, I took an EMT course, and I went to veetonulr on an amubnclae. For two years, I volunteered on an ambulance in Jerusalem. I helped many people, but whenever someone really needed help, I never got there in time. We never got there. The traffic is so bad. The distance, and everything. We never got there when somebody really needed us. One day, we received a call about a seven-year-old child cnihokg from a hot dog. Traffic was horrific, and we were coming from the other side of town in the north part of Jerusalem. When we got there, 20 minutes later, we started CPR on the kid. A doctor comes in from a block away, stop us, checks the kid, and tells us to stop CPR. That second he decearld this child dead. At that moment, I understood that this clhid died for nothing. If this doctor, who lived one block away from there, would have come 20 minutes eelriar, not have to wait until that siren he heard before cmonig from the ambulance, if he would have heard about it way before, he would have saved this child. He could have run from a blcok away. He could have saved this child. I said to myself, there must be a better way. Together with 15 of my frenids — we were all EMTs — we decided, let's protect our neighborhood, so when something like that happens again, we will be there running to the scene a lot before the ambulance. So I went over to the manager of the ambulance coanpmy and I told him, "Please, whenever you have a call coming into our neighborhood, we have 15 great guys who are willing to stop everything they're doing and run and save lives. Just alert us by beeper. We'll buy these beepers, just tell your dispatch to send us the bepeer, and we will run and save lives." Well, he was laughing. I was 17 years old. I was a kid. And he said to me — I remember this like yesterday — he was a great guy, but he said to me, "Kid, go to school, or go open a fafleal snatd. We're not really interested in these kinds of new artduevnes. We're not interested in your help." And he threw me out of the room. "I don't need your help," he said. I was a very stubborn kid. As you see now, I'm walking around like crazy, meshugenah. (Laughter) (Applause) So I decided to use the Israeli very famous technique you've probably all heard of, cthuzpah. (Laughter) And the next day, I went and I bought two ploice scanners, and I said, "The hell with you, if you don't want to give me information, I'll get the information myself." And we did turns, who's going to listen to the radio scanners. The next day, while I was lsnieintg to the scanners, I heard about a call coming in of a 70-year-old man hurt by a car only one block away from me on the main street of my niorohbheogd. I ran there by foot. I had no medical equipment. When I got there, the 70-year-old man was lying on the floor, blood was gushing out of his neck. He was on Coumadin. I knew I had to stop his bleeding or else he would die. I took off my yarmulke, because I had no medical epmqeniut, and with a lot of pserrsue, I stopped his bleeding. He was bleeding from his neck. When the ambulance airvred 15 minutes later, I gave them over a pateint who was alive. (Applause) When I went to vsiit him two days later, he gave me a hug and was crinyg and thanking me for saving his life. At that moment, when I realized this is the first person I ever saved in my life after two years volunteering in an ambulance, I knew this is my life's mission. So today, 22 years later, we have uenitd Hatzalah. (Applause) "Hatzalah" means "rescue," for all of you who don't know Hebrew. I frgoot I'm not in Israel. So we have thousands of volunteers who are passionate about saving lives, and they're spread all around, so whenever a call comes in, they just stop everything and go and run and save a life. Our average response time today went down to less than three minutes in Israel. (aaspplue) I'm talking about herat aaktcts, I'm talking about car accidents, God forbid bomb attacks, shootings, whatever it is, even a woman 3 o'clock in the morning falling in her home and needs someone to help her. Three minutes, we'll have a guy with his pajamas running to her house and helping her get up. The reasons why we're so successful are because of three things. Thousands of passionate volunteers who will leave everything they do and run to help people they don't even know. We're not there to rlcaepe ambulances. We're just there to get the gap between the ambulance call until they arrive. And we save people that otherwise would not be saved. The second reason is because of our tolohcegny. You know, Israelis are good in technology. Every one of us has on his phone, no matter what kind of phone, a GPS technology done by NowForce, and whenever a call comes in, the closest five volunteers get the call, and they actually get there really quick, and navigated by a traffic nvagatior to get there and not waste time. And this is a great technology we use all over the country and reduce the response time. And the third thing are these alebymuccs. These ambucycles are an ambulance on two wheels. We don't transfer people, but we stabilize them, and we save their lievs. They never get sctuk in traffic. They could even go on a sidewalk. They never, literally, get stuck in tiffrac. That's why we get there so fast. A few yraes after I staterd this organization, in a Jewish community, two Muslims from east jrseeulam called me up. They ask me to meet. They wanted to meet with me. maummahd Asli and Murad Alyan. When Muhammad told me his personal story, how his father, 55 years old, clalopsed at home, had a cardiac arrest, and it took over an hour for an ambulance arrive, and he saw his fhaetr die in front of his eyes, he asked me, "Please start this in east Jerusalem." I said to myself, I saw so much tragedy, so much hate, and it's not about saving Jews. It's not about saving Muslims. It's not about saving Christians. It's about snaivg people. So I went ahead, full force — (Applause) — and I started United Hatzalah in east Jerusalem, and that's why the names United and haalztah mtach so well. We started hand in hand saving Jews and Arabs. Arabs were saving Jews. Jews were saving Arabs. Something special happened. Arabs and Jews, they don't always get along together, but here in this situation, the communities, literally, it's an unbelievable situation that happened, the diversities, all of a sudden they had a cmoomn interest: Let's save lives together. setletrs were saving Arabs and Arabs were saving settlers. It's an unbelievable concept that could work only when you have such a great cause. And these are all volunteers. No one is getting money. They're all doing it for the purpose of saving lives. When my own father collapsed a few years ago from a cardiac arrest, one of the first volunteers to arrive to save my father was one of these Muslim volunteers from east Jerusalem who was in the first course to join Hatzalah. And he saved my father. Could you igimane how I felt in that moment? When I started this oagizatorinn, I was 17 years old. I never iiamgend that one day I'd be speaking at TEDMED. I never even knew what TEDMED was then. I don't think it esxetid, but I never imagined, I never imagined that it's going to go all around, it's going to spread around, and this last year we started in Panama and Brazil. All I need is a paternr who is a little meshugenah like me, postaianse about saving lives, and willing to do it. And I'm actually saittrng it in India very soon with a friend who I met in hraarvd just a while back. Hatzalah actually started in Brooklyn by a hsiiadc Jew years before us in wsibmurlailg, and now it's all over the Jewish community in New York, even Australia and Mexico and many other Jewish communities. But it could spread everywhere. It's very easy to adopt. You even saw these vorulentes in New York saving lives in the wlord Trade Center. Last year alone, we treated in Israel 207,000 ppeole. Forty-two thousand of them were life-threatening stnaiotius. And we made a difference. I guess you could call this a lifesaving flash mob, and it works. When I look all around here, I see lots of people who would go an extra mile, run an extra mile to save other people, no matter who they are, no matter what religion, no matter who, where they come from. We all want to be heroes. We just need a good idea, motivation and lots of chutzpah, and we could save mnloilis of people that otherwise would not be saved. Thank you very much. (Applause)

Open Cloze

This is an ambucycle. This is the _______ way to reach any _______ emergency. It has everything an ambulance has except for a bed. You see the defibrillator. You see the equipment. We all saw the tragedy that happened in ______. When I was looking at these pictures, it brought me back many years to my past when I was a child. I grew up in a small neighborhood in Jerusalem. When I was six years old, I was walking back from school on a Friday afternoon with my older brother. We were passing by a bus stop. We saw a bus blow up in front of our eyes. The bus was on fire, and many people were hurt and ______. I __________ an old man yelling to us and crying to help us get him up. He just needed someone helping him. We were so ______ and we just ran away. Growing up, I decided I wanted to become a ______ and save lives. Maybe that was because of what I saw when I was a child. When I was 15, I took an EMT course, and I went to _________ on an _________. For two years, I volunteered on an ambulance in Jerusalem. I helped many people, but whenever someone really needed help, I never got there in time. We never got there. The traffic is so bad. The distance, and everything. We never got there when somebody really needed us. One day, we received a call about a seven-year-old child _______ from a hot dog. Traffic was horrific, and we were coming from the other side of town in the north part of Jerusalem. When we got there, 20 minutes later, we started CPR on the kid. A doctor comes in from a block away, stop us, checks the kid, and tells us to stop CPR. That second he ________ this child dead. At that moment, I understood that this _____ died for nothing. If this doctor, who lived one block away from there, would have come 20 minutes _______, not have to wait until that siren he heard before ______ from the ambulance, if he would have heard about it way before, he would have saved this child. He could have run from a _____ away. He could have saved this child. I said to myself, there must be a better way. Together with 15 of my _______ — we were all EMTs — we decided, let's protect our neighborhood, so when something like that happens again, we will be there running to the scene a lot before the ambulance. So I went over to the manager of the ambulance _______ and I told him, "Please, whenever you have a call coming into our neighborhood, we have 15 great guys who are willing to stop everything they're doing and run and save lives. Just alert us by beeper. We'll buy these beepers, just tell your dispatch to send us the ______, and we will run and save lives." Well, he was laughing. I was 17 years old. I was a kid. And he said to me — I remember this like yesterday — he was a great guy, but he said to me, "Kid, go to school, or go open a _______ _____. We're not really interested in these kinds of new __________. We're not interested in your help." And he threw me out of the room. "I don't need your help," he said. I was a very stubborn kid. As you see now, I'm walking around like crazy, meshugenah. (Laughter) (Applause) So I decided to use the Israeli very famous technique you've probably all heard of, ________. (Laughter) And the next day, I went and I bought two ______ scanners, and I said, "The hell with you, if you don't want to give me information, I'll get the information myself." And we did turns, who's going to listen to the radio scanners. The next day, while I was _________ to the scanners, I heard about a call coming in of a 70-year-old man hurt by a car only one block away from me on the main street of my ____________. I ran there by foot. I had no medical equipment. When I got there, the 70-year-old man was lying on the floor, blood was gushing out of his neck. He was on Coumadin. I knew I had to stop his bleeding or else he would die. I took off my yarmulke, because I had no medical _________, and with a lot of ________, I stopped his bleeding. He was bleeding from his neck. When the ambulance _______ 15 minutes later, I gave them over a _______ who was alive. (Applause) When I went to _____ him two days later, he gave me a hug and was ______ and thanking me for saving his life. At that moment, when I realized this is the first person I ever saved in my life after two years volunteering in an ambulance, I knew this is my life's mission. So today, 22 years later, we have ______ Hatzalah. (Applause) "Hatzalah" means "rescue," for all of you who don't know Hebrew. I ______ I'm not in Israel. So we have thousands of volunteers who are passionate about saving lives, and they're spread all around, so whenever a call comes in, they just stop everything and go and run and save a life. Our average response time today went down to less than three minutes in Israel. (________) I'm talking about _____ _______, I'm talking about car accidents, God forbid bomb attacks, shootings, whatever it is, even a woman 3 o'clock in the morning falling in her home and needs someone to help her. Three minutes, we'll have a guy with his pajamas running to her house and helping her get up. The reasons why we're so successful are because of three things. Thousands of passionate volunteers who will leave everything they do and run to help people they don't even know. We're not there to _______ ambulances. We're just there to get the gap between the ambulance call until they arrive. And we save people that otherwise would not be saved. The second reason is because of our __________. You know, Israelis are good in technology. Every one of us has on his phone, no matter what kind of phone, a GPS technology done by NowForce, and whenever a call comes in, the closest five volunteers get the call, and they actually get there really quick, and navigated by a traffic _________ to get there and not waste time. And this is a great technology we use all over the country and reduce the response time. And the third thing are these __________. These ambucycles are an ambulance on two wheels. We don't transfer people, but we stabilize them, and we save their _____. They never get _____ in traffic. They could even go on a sidewalk. They never, literally, get stuck in _______. That's why we get there so fast. A few _____ after I _______ this organization, in a Jewish community, two Muslims from east _________ called me up. They ask me to meet. They wanted to meet with me. ________ Asli and Murad Alyan. When Muhammad told me his personal story, how his father, 55 years old, _________ at home, had a cardiac arrest, and it took over an hour for an ambulance arrive, and he saw his ______ die in front of his eyes, he asked me, "Please start this in east Jerusalem." I said to myself, I saw so much tragedy, so much hate, and it's not about saving Jews. It's not about saving Muslims. It's not about saving Christians. It's about ______ people. So I went ahead, full force — (Applause) — and I started United Hatzalah in east Jerusalem, and that's why the names United and ________ _____ so well. We started hand in hand saving Jews and Arabs. Arabs were saving Jews. Jews were saving Arabs. Something special happened. Arabs and Jews, they don't always get along together, but here in this situation, the communities, literally, it's an unbelievable situation that happened, the diversities, all of a sudden they had a ______ interest: Let's save lives together. ________ were saving Arabs and Arabs were saving settlers. It's an unbelievable concept that could work only when you have such a great cause. And these are all volunteers. No one is getting money. They're all doing it for the purpose of saving lives. When my own father collapsed a few years ago from a cardiac arrest, one of the first volunteers to arrive to save my father was one of these Muslim volunteers from east Jerusalem who was in the first course to join Hatzalah. And he saved my father. Could you _______ how I felt in that moment? When I started this ____________, I was 17 years old. I never ________ that one day I'd be speaking at TEDMED. I never even knew what TEDMED was then. I don't think it _______, but I never imagined, I never imagined that it's going to go all around, it's going to spread around, and this last year we started in Panama and Brazil. All I need is a _______ who is a little meshugenah like me, __________ about saving lives, and willing to do it. And I'm actually ________ it in India very soon with a friend who I met in _______ just a while back. Hatzalah actually started in Brooklyn by a _______ Jew years before us in ____________, and now it's all over the Jewish community in New York, even Australia and Mexico and many other Jewish communities. But it could spread everywhere. It's very easy to adopt. You even saw these __________ in New York saving lives in the _____ Trade Center. Last year alone, we treated in Israel 207,000 ______. Forty-two thousand of them were life-threatening __________. And we made a difference. I guess you could call this a lifesaving flash mob, and it works. When I look all around here, I see lots of people who would go an extra mile, run an extra mile to save other people, no matter who they are, no matter what religion, no matter who, where they come from. We all want to be heroes. We just need a good idea, motivation and lots of chutzpah, and we could save ________ of people that otherwise would not be saved. Thank you very much. (Applause)

Solution

  1. arrived
  2. lives
  3. settlers
  4. collapsed
  5. jerusalem
  6. world
  7. heart
  8. company
  9. volunteer
  10. applause
  11. scared
  12. fastest
  13. crying
  14. imagined
  15. ambulance
  16. police
  17. stand
  18. millions
  19. declared
  20. friends
  21. remembered
  22. listening
  23. ambucycles
  24. earlier
  25. doctor
  26. match
  27. united
  28. replace
  29. williamsburg
  30. child
  31. neighborhood
  32. navigator
  33. patient
  34. partner
  35. falafel
  36. visit
  37. saving
  38. technology
  39. attacks
  40. starting
  41. hasidic
  42. medical
  43. imagine
  44. situations
  45. killed
  46. people
  47. father
  48. muhammad
  49. pressure
  50. stuck
  51. forgot
  52. hatzalah
  53. chutzpah
  54. started
  55. coming
  56. existed
  57. passionate
  58. traffic
  59. beeper
  60. years
  61. choking
  62. boston
  63. organization
  64. block
  65. adventures
  66. equipment
  67. common
  68. volunteers
  69. harvard

Original Text

This is an ambucycle. This is the fastest way to reach any medical emergency. It has everything an ambulance has except for a bed. You see the defibrillator. You see the equipment. We all saw the tragedy that happened in Boston. When I was looking at these pictures, it brought me back many years to my past when I was a child. I grew up in a small neighborhood in Jerusalem. When I was six years old, I was walking back from school on a Friday afternoon with my older brother. We were passing by a bus stop. We saw a bus blow up in front of our eyes. The bus was on fire, and many people were hurt and killed. I remembered an old man yelling to us and crying to help us get him up. He just needed someone helping him. We were so scared and we just ran away. Growing up, I decided I wanted to become a doctor and save lives. Maybe that was because of what I saw when I was a child. When I was 15, I took an EMT course, and I went to volunteer on an ambulance. For two years, I volunteered on an ambulance in Jerusalem. I helped many people, but whenever someone really needed help, I never got there in time. We never got there. The traffic is so bad. The distance, and everything. We never got there when somebody really needed us. One day, we received a call about a seven-year-old child choking from a hot dog. Traffic was horrific, and we were coming from the other side of town in the north part of Jerusalem. When we got there, 20 minutes later, we started CPR on the kid. A doctor comes in from a block away, stop us, checks the kid, and tells us to stop CPR. That second he declared this child dead. At that moment, I understood that this child died for nothing. If this doctor, who lived one block away from there, would have come 20 minutes earlier, not have to wait until that siren he heard before coming from the ambulance, if he would have heard about it way before, he would have saved this child. He could have run from a block away. He could have saved this child. I said to myself, there must be a better way. Together with 15 of my friends — we were all EMTs — we decided, let's protect our neighborhood, so when something like that happens again, we will be there running to the scene a lot before the ambulance. So I went over to the manager of the ambulance company and I told him, "Please, whenever you have a call coming into our neighborhood, we have 15 great guys who are willing to stop everything they're doing and run and save lives. Just alert us by beeper. We'll buy these beepers, just tell your dispatch to send us the beeper, and we will run and save lives." Well, he was laughing. I was 17 years old. I was a kid. And he said to me — I remember this like yesterday — he was a great guy, but he said to me, "Kid, go to school, or go open a falafel stand. We're not really interested in these kinds of new adventures. We're not interested in your help." And he threw me out of the room. "I don't need your help," he said. I was a very stubborn kid. As you see now, I'm walking around like crazy, meshugenah. (Laughter) (Applause) So I decided to use the Israeli very famous technique you've probably all heard of, chutzpah. (Laughter) And the next day, I went and I bought two police scanners, and I said, "The hell with you, if you don't want to give me information, I'll get the information myself." And we did turns, who's going to listen to the radio scanners. The next day, while I was listening to the scanners, I heard about a call coming in of a 70-year-old man hurt by a car only one block away from me on the main street of my neighborhood. I ran there by foot. I had no medical equipment. When I got there, the 70-year-old man was lying on the floor, blood was gushing out of his neck. He was on Coumadin. I knew I had to stop his bleeding or else he would die. I took off my yarmulke, because I had no medical equipment, and with a lot of pressure, I stopped his bleeding. He was bleeding from his neck. When the ambulance arrived 15 minutes later, I gave them over a patient who was alive. (Applause) When I went to visit him two days later, he gave me a hug and was crying and thanking me for saving his life. At that moment, when I realized this is the first person I ever saved in my life after two years volunteering in an ambulance, I knew this is my life's mission. So today, 22 years later, we have United Hatzalah. (Applause) "Hatzalah" means "rescue," for all of you who don't know Hebrew. I forgot I'm not in Israel. So we have thousands of volunteers who are passionate about saving lives, and they're spread all around, so whenever a call comes in, they just stop everything and go and run and save a life. Our average response time today went down to less than three minutes in Israel. (Applause) I'm talking about heart attacks, I'm talking about car accidents, God forbid bomb attacks, shootings, whatever it is, even a woman 3 o'clock in the morning falling in her home and needs someone to help her. Three minutes, we'll have a guy with his pajamas running to her house and helping her get up. The reasons why we're so successful are because of three things. Thousands of passionate volunteers who will leave everything they do and run to help people they don't even know. We're not there to replace ambulances. We're just there to get the gap between the ambulance call until they arrive. And we save people that otherwise would not be saved. The second reason is because of our technology. You know, Israelis are good in technology. Every one of us has on his phone, no matter what kind of phone, a GPS technology done by NowForce, and whenever a call comes in, the closest five volunteers get the call, and they actually get there really quick, and navigated by a traffic navigator to get there and not waste time. And this is a great technology we use all over the country and reduce the response time. And the third thing are these ambucycles. These ambucycles are an ambulance on two wheels. We don't transfer people, but we stabilize them, and we save their lives. They never get stuck in traffic. They could even go on a sidewalk. They never, literally, get stuck in traffic. That's why we get there so fast. A few years after I started this organization, in a Jewish community, two Muslims from east Jerusalem called me up. They ask me to meet. They wanted to meet with me. Muhammad Asli and Murad Alyan. When Muhammad told me his personal story, how his father, 55 years old, collapsed at home, had a cardiac arrest, and it took over an hour for an ambulance arrive, and he saw his father die in front of his eyes, he asked me, "Please start this in east Jerusalem." I said to myself, I saw so much tragedy, so much hate, and it's not about saving Jews. It's not about saving Muslims. It's not about saving Christians. It's about saving people. So I went ahead, full force — (Applause) — and I started United Hatzalah in east Jerusalem, and that's why the names United and Hatzalah match so well. We started hand in hand saving Jews and Arabs. Arabs were saving Jews. Jews were saving Arabs. Something special happened. Arabs and Jews, they don't always get along together, but here in this situation, the communities, literally, it's an unbelievable situation that happened, the diversities, all of a sudden they had a common interest: Let's save lives together. Settlers were saving Arabs and Arabs were saving settlers. It's an unbelievable concept that could work only when you have such a great cause. And these are all volunteers. No one is getting money. They're all doing it for the purpose of saving lives. When my own father collapsed a few years ago from a cardiac arrest, one of the first volunteers to arrive to save my father was one of these Muslim volunteers from east Jerusalem who was in the first course to join Hatzalah. And he saved my father. Could you imagine how I felt in that moment? When I started this organization, I was 17 years old. I never imagined that one day I'd be speaking at TEDMED. I never even knew what TEDMED was then. I don't think it existed, but I never imagined, I never imagined that it's going to go all around, it's going to spread around, and this last year we started in Panama and Brazil. All I need is a partner who is a little meshugenah like me, passionate about saving lives, and willing to do it. And I'm actually starting it in India very soon with a friend who I met in Harvard just a while back. Hatzalah actually started in Brooklyn by a Hasidic Jew years before us in Williamsburg, and now it's all over the Jewish community in New York, even Australia and Mexico and many other Jewish communities. But it could spread everywhere. It's very easy to adopt. You even saw these volunteers in New York saving lives in the World Trade Center. Last year alone, we treated in Israel 207,000 people. Forty-two thousand of them were life-threatening situations. And we made a difference. I guess you could call this a lifesaving flash mob, and it works. When I look all around here, I see lots of people who would go an extra mile, run an extra mile to save other people, no matter who they are, no matter what religion, no matter who, where they come from. We all want to be heroes. We just need a good idea, motivation and lots of chutzpah, and we could save millions of people that otherwise would not be saved. Thank you very much. (Applause)

Frequently Occurring Word Combinations

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
save lives 3
saving jews 3
call coming 2
united hatzalah 2
response time 2
east jerusalem 2
saving arabs 2
saving lives 2

Important Words

  1. accidents
  2. adopt
  3. adventures
  4. afternoon
  5. alert
  6. alive
  7. alyan
  8. ambucycle
  9. ambucycles
  10. ambulance
  11. ambulances
  12. applause
  13. arabs
  14. arrest
  15. arrive
  16. arrived
  17. asked
  18. asli
  19. attacks
  20. australia
  21. average
  22. bad
  23. bed
  24. beeper
  25. beepers
  26. bleeding
  27. block
  28. blood
  29. blow
  30. bomb
  31. boston
  32. bought
  33. brazil
  34. brooklyn
  35. brother
  36. brought
  37. bus
  38. buy
  39. call
  40. called
  41. car
  42. cardiac
  43. center
  44. checks
  45. child
  46. choking
  47. christians
  48. chutzpah
  49. closest
  50. collapsed
  51. coming
  52. common
  53. communities
  54. community
  55. company
  56. concept
  57. coumadin
  58. country
  59. cpr
  60. crazy
  61. crying
  62. day
  63. days
  64. dead
  65. decided
  66. declared
  67. defibrillator
  68. die
  69. died
  70. difference
  71. dispatch
  72. distance
  73. diversities
  74. doctor
  75. dog
  76. earlier
  77. east
  78. easy
  79. emergency
  80. emt
  81. emts
  82. equipment
  83. existed
  84. extra
  85. eyes
  86. falafel
  87. falling
  88. famous
  89. fast
  90. fastest
  91. father
  92. felt
  93. fire
  94. flash
  95. floor
  96. foot
  97. forbid
  98. force
  99. forgot
  100. friday
  101. friend
  102. friends
  103. front
  104. full
  105. gap
  106. gave
  107. give
  108. god
  109. good
  110. gps
  111. great
  112. grew
  113. growing
  114. guess
  115. gushing
  116. guy
  117. guys
  118. hand
  119. happened
  120. harvard
  121. hasidic
  122. hate
  123. hatzalah
  124. heard
  125. heart
  126. hebrew
  127. hell
  128. helped
  129. helping
  130. heroes
  131. home
  132. horrific
  133. hot
  134. hour
  135. house
  136. hug
  137. hurt
  138. idea
  139. imagine
  140. imagined
  141. india
  142. information
  143. interested
  144. israel
  145. israeli
  146. israelis
  147. jerusalem
  148. jew
  149. jewish
  150. jews
  151. join
  152. kid
  153. killed
  154. kind
  155. kinds
  156. knew
  157. laughing
  158. laughter
  159. leave
  160. life
  161. lifesaving
  162. listen
  163. listening
  164. literally
  165. lived
  166. lives
  167. lot
  168. lots
  169. lying
  170. main
  171. man
  172. manager
  173. match
  174. matter
  175. means
  176. medical
  177. meet
  178. meshugenah
  179. met
  180. mexico
  181. mile
  182. millions
  183. minutes
  184. mission
  185. mob
  186. moment
  187. money
  188. morning
  189. motivation
  190. muhammad
  191. murad
  192. muslim
  193. muslims
  194. names
  195. navigated
  196. navigator
  197. neck
  198. needed
  199. neighborhood
  200. north
  201. nowforce
  202. older
  203. open
  204. organization
  205. pajamas
  206. panama
  207. part
  208. partner
  209. passing
  210. passionate
  211. patient
  212. people
  213. person
  214. personal
  215. phone
  216. pictures
  217. police
  218. pressure
  219. protect
  220. purpose
  221. quick
  222. radio
  223. ran
  224. reach
  225. realized
  226. reason
  227. reasons
  228. received
  229. reduce
  230. religion
  231. remember
  232. remembered
  233. replace
  234. response
  235. room
  236. run
  237. running
  238. save
  239. saved
  240. saving
  241. scanners
  242. scared
  243. scene
  244. school
  245. send
  246. settlers
  247. shootings
  248. side
  249. sidewalk
  250. siren
  251. situation
  252. situations
  253. small
  254. speaking
  255. special
  256. spread
  257. stabilize
  258. stand
  259. start
  260. started
  261. starting
  262. stop
  263. stopped
  264. story
  265. street
  266. stubborn
  267. stuck
  268. successful
  269. sudden
  270. talking
  271. technique
  272. technology
  273. tedmed
  274. tells
  275. thanking
  276. thousand
  277. thousands
  278. threw
  279. time
  280. today
  281. told
  282. town
  283. trade
  284. traffic
  285. tragedy
  286. transfer
  287. treated
  288. turns
  289. unbelievable
  290. understood
  291. united
  292. visit
  293. volunteer
  294. volunteered
  295. volunteering
  296. volunteers
  297. wait
  298. walking
  299. wanted
  300. waste
  301. wheels
  302. williamsburg
  303. woman
  304. work
  305. works
  306. world
  307. yarmulke
  308. year
  309. years
  310. yelling
  311. yesterday
  312. york