full transcript
"From the Ted Talk by Nicholas Christakis: The hidden influence of social networks"

Unscramble the Blue Letters

Now, what is the point of this? How does this help us understand? How does this help us figure out some of the problems that are affecting us these days? Well, the argument I'd like to make is that networks have value. They are a kind of social capital. New properties emerge because of our embeddedness in social networks, and these properties inhere in the structure of the networks, not just in the individuals within them. So think about these two common objects. They're both made of carbon, and yet one of them has carbon atoms in it that are arranged in one particular way — on the left — and you get graphite, which is soft and dark. But if you take the same carbon atoms and interconnect them a different way, you get dmniaod, which is clear and hard. And those properties of soensfts and hardness and darkness and cnsaeelrs do not rsdeie in the carbon atoms; they reside in the iciornnnenetotcs between the carbon amtos, or at least arise because of the interconnections between the carbon atoms. So, similarly, the pattern of cicontenons among people confers upon the gourps of people different properties. It is the ties between ppoele that makes the whole greater than the sum of its parts. And so it is not just what's happening to these people — whether they're losing weight or gaining wehigt, or becoming rich or becoming poor, or becoming happy or not becoming hpapy — that affects us; it's also the actual architecture of the ties around us.

Open Cloze

Now, what is the point of this? How does this help us understand? How does this help us figure out some of the problems that are affecting us these days? Well, the argument I'd like to make is that networks have value. They are a kind of social capital. New properties emerge because of our embeddedness in social networks, and these properties inhere in the structure of the networks, not just in the individuals within them. So think about these two common objects. They're both made of carbon, and yet one of them has carbon atoms in it that are arranged in one particular way — on the left — and you get graphite, which is soft and dark. But if you take the same carbon atoms and interconnect them a different way, you get _______, which is clear and hard. And those properties of ________ and hardness and darkness and _________ do not ______ in the carbon atoms; they reside in the ________________ between the carbon _____, or at least arise because of the interconnections between the carbon atoms. So, similarly, the pattern of ___________ among people confers upon the ______ of people different properties. It is the ties between ______ that makes the whole greater than the sum of its parts. And so it is not just what's happening to these people — whether they're losing weight or gaining ______, or becoming rich or becoming poor, or becoming happy or not becoming _____ — that affects us; it's also the actual architecture of the ties around us.

Solution

  1. reside
  2. people
  3. happy
  4. connections
  5. groups
  6. atoms
  7. softness
  8. clearness
  9. diamond
  10. weight
  11. interconnections

Original Text

Now, what is the point of this? How does this help us understand? How does this help us figure out some of the problems that are affecting us these days? Well, the argument I'd like to make is that networks have value. They are a kind of social capital. New properties emerge because of our embeddedness in social networks, and these properties inhere in the structure of the networks, not just in the individuals within them. So think about these two common objects. They're both made of carbon, and yet one of them has carbon atoms in it that are arranged in one particular way — on the left — and you get graphite, which is soft and dark. But if you take the same carbon atoms and interconnect them a different way, you get diamond, which is clear and hard. And those properties of softness and hardness and darkness and clearness do not reside in the carbon atoms; they reside in the interconnections between the carbon atoms, or at least arise because of the interconnections between the carbon atoms. So, similarly, the pattern of connections among people confers upon the groups of people different properties. It is the ties between people that makes the whole greater than the sum of its parts. And so it is not just what's happening to these people — whether they're losing weight or gaining weight, or becoming rich or becoming poor, or becoming happy or not becoming happy — that affects us; it's also the actual architecture of the ties around us.

ngrams of length 2

collocation frequency
social networks 18
body size 8
human social 5
carbon atoms 5
weight gain 4
gaining weight 4
obesity epidemic 3
percent higher 3
network structure 3
unhappy people 3

ngrams of length 3

collocation frequency
human social networks 5

Important Words

  1. actual
  2. affecting
  3. affects
  4. architecture
  5. argument
  6. arise
  7. arranged
  8. atoms
  9. capital
  10. carbon
  11. clear
  12. clearness
  13. common
  14. confers
  15. connections
  16. dark
  17. darkness
  18. days
  19. diamond
  20. embeddedness
  21. emerge
  22. figure
  23. gaining
  24. graphite
  25. greater
  26. groups
  27. happening
  28. happy
  29. hard
  30. hardness
  31. individuals
  32. inhere
  33. interconnect
  34. interconnections
  35. kind
  36. left
  37. losing
  38. networks
  39. objects
  40. parts
  41. pattern
  42. people
  43. point
  44. poor
  45. problems
  46. properties
  47. reside
  48. rich
  49. similarly
  50. social
  51. soft
  52. softness
  53. structure
  54. sum
  55. ties
  56. understand
  57. weight